wolfhnd
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Emotional Intelligence: Science and Myth
by Gerald Matthews, Moshe Zeidner, and Richard D. Roberts; Cambridge, Massachusetts, MIT Press, 2002, 736 pages,

So what do the authors conclude from their exhaustive efforts? Is emotional intelligence something new? Is it distinct from existing measures of individual difference? Or is it old wine in new bottles? They conclude with a cautious pessimism about the utility of emotional intelligence. They find serious psychometric limitations with all published measures of emotional intelligence. They are not optimistic about the prospects for developing a coherent, empirically supported theory of emotional intelligence. They suggest that the applied benefits of the construct are limited, especially in the clinical arena, "where the principle of taking emotions seriously is already ingrained." Although they believe that the popularity of emotional intelligence seems to be based more on myth than on science, they urge readers not to underestimate the potential of the emotional intelligence construct to educate us, to stimulate thought and action, and to spur further study.


This is a subject that you would think barely needs covered. Anyone needing to be told that it is a good idea to develop the "competence to identify, express, and understand emotions; assimilate emotions in thought; and regulate both positive and negative emotions in oneself and others" must be dense. That said emotions or instincts are common to almost all animals including those that are not considered particularity intelligent. Surely it is understood that "Intelligence is an umbrella term used to describe a property of the mind that encompasses many related abilities, such as the capacities to reason, to plan, to solve problems, to think abstractly, to comprehend ideas, to use language, and to learn." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence no where in that definition is the word instinct used. I'm sure that there are various levels of instinctual intelligence but I'm not at all sure that it is worth measuring.

http://www.psychservices.psychiatryonli ... l/55/4/458

Last edited by BioWizard on May 17th, 2009, 8:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Emotional Intelligence: Science and Myth

Permanent Linkby wolfhnd on May 19th, 2009, 8:10 pm

Scientists discover area of brain that makes a 'people person'
Same region linked to processing of pleasures such as sweet tastes and sexual stimuli

Dr Murray explained: "It's interesting that the degree to which we find social interaction rewarding relates to the structure of our brains in regions that are important for very simple biological drives such as food, sweet liquids and sex. Perhaps this gives us a clue to how complex features like sentimentality and affection evolved from structures that in lower animals originally were only important for basic biological survival processes."

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 051809.php
wolfhnd
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