Numerical systems in time.

Discussions on the philosophical foundations, assumptions, and implications of science, including the natural sciences.

Numerical systems in time.

Postby Event Horizon on December 13th, 2018, 12:13 pm 

When a number system collapses, or is collapsed it would be incremental I would think perhaps. But when I think of a collapse in QM, it is pretty much instantaneous wherever it is in the universe. Information is often numerical inasmuch as math can describe all physical things. I think.
Should we have a law describing how information behaves under various conditions?
I'd like to fess up this is not my field. Pls forgive any ignorance herein.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 404
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Numerical systems in time.

Postby edy420 on December 13th, 2018, 4:02 pm 

This is another attempt at making logic conform to reality.

We have two truths.
1. Time seems linear
2. We can break down increments of time

Knowing that time is linear, we understand that we move forward as time progresses. We break down time to create a tool of time observation.

But we often try to use this tool for a job it's not capable of doing. Which is defining an increment of time. How small, is the smallest increment of time.

It seems, the more we find out, the more we realise that we don't know.
Logic has its uses, but also has its boundaries.

Event Horizon » 14 Dec 2018, 05:13 wrote:Should we have a law describing how information behaves under various conditions?


I'd call it, the law of human conceptualization.
User avatar
edy420
Active Member
 
Posts: 1257
Joined: 09 Jul 2010
Location: Fergusson st, Tokoroa, NZ


Re: Numerical systems in time.

Postby -1- on December 15th, 2018, 10:06 am 

Event Horizon, how do you conceptualize a number system? And once that's done, how do you conceptualize its collapse?

Maybe these are known things, and I could look it up on the Internet. I looked up number systems, and it's a plain convention how to write down the numerical portions of amounts. I looked up number system collapse, and there was nothing returned.

If you want us to discuss number system collapse with you, first you have to let us know how you imagine that is or can happen, as there is no precedence of the concept before this thread in math or in philosophical literature.
User avatar
-1-
Member
 
Posts: 247
Joined: 21 Jul 2018


Re: Numerical systems in time.

Postby Event Horizon on December 17th, 2018, 8:21 pm 

A number system built on a law can be very ordered and structured. If that law later proved to be false orflawed the structure would collapse in this scenario. But how does it collapse in reality? Is it instant everywhere like in QM?
Its just a concept, I don't know if it has value.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 404
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Numerical systems in time.

Postby -1- on December 17th, 2018, 10:33 pm 

Event Horizon » December 17th, 2018, 8:21 pm wrote:A number system built on a law can be very ordered and structured. If that law later proved to be false orflawed the structure would collapse in this scenario. But how does it collapse in reality? Is it instant everywhere like in QM?
Its just a concept, I don't know if it has value.

A number system is nothing more than naming ordinal numbers and combining elements of names to denote amounts.

This is not built on a law, but on convention. Is it ordered and structured? Those qualities are not even applicable to number systems. They are neither ordered, nor not ordered, and they are neither structured nor unstructured, other than what the convention says, not what some overriding law says.

I still don't understand what you mean by "collapse of number system". Perhaps you have a unique definition of the expression "number system" which is not the same as the conventionally agreed definition, derived from the convention of language?

Pray tell what you consider a "number system". Thanks.
User avatar
-1-
Member
 
Posts: 247
Joined: 21 Jul 2018



Return to Philosophy of Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests