The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with Phil

Discussions on the philosophical foundations, assumptions, and implications of science, including the natural sciences.

The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with Phil

Postby socrat44 on September 15th, 2018, 8:01 am 

The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with Philosophy
By Abraham Loeb on September 10, 2018

Scientific discoveries substantiate our awe when faced with
the richness and universality of the laws of nature.
But science falls short of explaining this natural order and
why it exists in the first place.

This is where philosophy comes to the rescue.
. . . .
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/ob ... hilosophy/

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socrat44
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Re: The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with

Postby Alan Masterman on May 15th, 2019, 11:05 pm 

An intelligent post, and an interesting article, but of course it butts its head against the old problem: science is value-neutral, and cannot furnish a guide to ethics.
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Re: The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with

Postby JohnD on May 16th, 2019, 3:01 am 

Alan Masterman » 16 May 2019, 13:05 wrote:An intelligent post, and an interesting article, but of course it butts its head against the old problem: science is value-neutral, and cannot furnish a guide to ethics.

Is it? Thought construct would say otherwise. Certainly when science is considered outside of theory, in other words facts alone, then yes it is neutral.
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Re: The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with

Postby Serpent on May 16th, 2019, 9:24 am 

Whoa!
For someone who said this -

.....the same laws that govern its [the universe] earliest moments.....also preside over what we find today in laboratories on Earth. This should not be taken for granted. We could have witnessed a fragmented reality, one in which different regions of spacetime obey different sets of laws or even behave chaotically with no rational explanation.

I can't quite imagine how he thinks reality would go about fracturing, or why it would do so, and how part of it would then go on to the the high degree of organization that makes life possible.
this:
Fortunately, we currently have the technology to search for both primitive and intelligent life elsewhere. And the knowledge we will acquire over the next millennium may shape the way we view our place in the universe in an unexpected fashion—whether we have “free will” or not.

seems to be taking for granted something quite unfounded in observable reality: that human organization and technology will proceed in a straight line, without a break.
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