Gardening: What are you growing ?

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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on April 21st, 2017, 10:07 am 

Oh yes, gardening is great for gaining an appreciation for farmers.

This might be a good day to buy some lettuce starts and plant it in the box. I think I see sunshine. I have decided to use lettuce starts this year, so I am sure of what is growing. The mixed lettuce seeds give me plants I can't identify and then I don't know if I am growing lettuce or weeds. I have eaten some bitter stuff thinking it was lettuce. And I think I like the idea of using twigs to discourage the cats.

I will look into Scat too. I am not a cat person, so I know nothing about their ways or how to keep them away from my plants. I know our airport uses cougar poop to keep the deer away. Evidently not too far away is a sanctuary for cougars. Isn't it great that a sanctuary can be at least partly funded by what the animals produce.

About soil. Before the community garden plot, I just took good soil for granted. I have lived in places with great soil. The plot has terrible soil. I have used different manures. Hum, this reminds me, it is time to get a bucket full of fish scraps. Where I planted mostly salmon heads and backbones, was the best producing area of my garden. My dog dug up one and for two weeks I worried if he would get sick. Next year I boil the salmon to kill the parasite that can kill a dog. That was a lot of work. I don't have a dog this year, so I can just bury the salmon scraps.

I wish I had a flame thrower to scorch my ground. I have bugs that live in the ground and come out and destroy squash plants. Any idea for that problem?
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on April 21st, 2017, 2:35 pm 

Athena » April 21st, 2017, 9:07 am wrote:Oh yes, gardening is great for gaining an appreciation for farmers.

We try to remember that when stuck on the highway behind a very slow, very ripe fertilizer spreader. In late summer, the harvesters lumber along at a majestic pace. Hay trailers, we stay right away from: I've seen two of those topple over, and the giant bales roll off.

The mixed lettuce seeds give me plants I can't identify and then I don't know if I am growing lettuce or weeds.

I use a mix of seeds, but mix them myself from Romaine, red and green curly, Boston, and oakleaf, maybe some beet. Not a fan of arugula, and mustard outgrows everything and bolts before the other leaves are edible. If I want to eat dandelion, I pick it outside, where we also have a patch of heritage* sorrel.
(* That just means some relative brought the seed from Europe, many years ago. I could get it here now, but wouldn't mix it with other plants, as it's a super hardy perennial.)

Isn't it great that a sanctuary can be at least partly funded by what the animals produce.

Yea! Especially predators - not famous for their productivity.

I wish I had a flame thrower to scorch my ground. I have bugs that live in the ground and come out and destroy squash plants. Any idea for that problem?

Most of the things that live in soil are necessary for growing things. Scorched earth is even less famous for productivity than cougars.
Cutworm? Could be a couple of other things. One remedy is collars on the plants. Cut the lower end off plastic beverage bottles and push the cut edge down into the soil over each seedling. This prevents anything crawling to it over or just below the ground and also keeps it warm and moist - a little individual greenhouse. Twist off the cap for air circulation; put it back on for cold nights.
I've heard diatomacious earth sprinkled over the surface works; wood-ash might. I've had good luck with just the ground cover. Of course, I also plant more squash than I expect to survive. Last three years have been bad for them - not sure why only one in three lived to harvest.
Six nice dwarf cucumber plants are thriving, with tiny fruit on, in the indoor buckets. Containers may be another way to protect them.
If you want to read up on pests, I recommend the Rodale problem solver book - every public library carries that; it's well organized and has a sensible, straight-forward style.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on April 22nd, 2017, 2:38 pm 

I made a note of the book and will check the library.

The squash beetles are not so easily controlled. They crawl and fly and multiple a lot! The first couple of years I ignored them and still had good harvests, but last year I lost all my zucchini. I didn't even think that possible! But I just read mulching can increase the problem, and my garden was well mulched. I will avoid the mulch and police the whole community garden and make sure everyone is well informed.

Besides avoiding squash this year, I will follow this advice, so maybe next year it will be safe to plant squash again and everything I plant this year has some protection.

http://thefreerangelife.com/control-squash-bugs/
You can also help control squash bugs by planting repellent plants with your squashes. Two of the most commonly used companions for squash is nasturtiums and white icicle radishes. Plant them throughout your squash beds for the best results. Other plants such as oregano, marigold, calendula and dill can also provide some protection.


Yesterday my granddaughter and I planted beets and spinach by adding bags of dry soil to the ground. She seems more interested in the garden this year, so I am more willing to invest money into it.

I need to plant the lettuce starts I bought yesterday in the box by the apartments. The peas and tomato I planted are looking good. It would be nice if the lettuce is still growing when the tomatoes ripen. If I ever get a chance to speak with God, I will make the suggestion that lettuce and tomatoes ripen at the same time.

We try to remember that when stuck on the highway behind a very slow, very ripe fertilizer spreader. In late summer, the harvesters lumber along at a majestic pace. Hay trailers, we stay right away from: I've seen two of those topple over, and the giant bales roll off.


Yeah, not fun to be behind those. A good time to pull off the road and have a picnic or stop at a cafe and have ice cream. We came upon a cattle truck that had tipped over, and the cattle was wondering all over the road. I would not want to be that truck driver.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on April 22nd, 2017, 6:00 pm 

I wouldn't want to be those cattle! Or any cattle, really...
I'll try planting more herbs near the squashes this year. Before, I always kept oregano separate, because it tends to invade, basil in pots, so I can bring them inside in late season, and dill has not done well. Nasturtiums are attractive, will grow anywhere, and you can eat the flowers. What's not to like?

It is too bad about most lettuce being cool-weather plants, while tomato is a sun worshipper. Maybe if you start Romain and some variety of head lettuce in a special row, you can leave thhose to develop longer than the green leafies, and let the tomatoes catch up? I've had very poor luck with that. Our summer is just too hot; everything bolts before it heads up properly. We usually make do with staggered plantings, as with peas.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on April 23rd, 2017, 12:38 pm 

Laugh, what's not to like is the taste of flowers. In early spring dandelion flowers can taste good, and they can be good for a person, but you can never be sure a dog didn't pee on them, so I buy dandelion tea, instead of eating the flowers along the bike path. I have eaten other flowers and they can make a salad interesting, but I would not say I enjoy the taste.

Do you use your dill?

My plot had herbs when I first took it over, but I am not a cook and don't know my herbs, and grass was embedded in the herbs. In an effort to get the grass out, I destroyed the herbs. Now I have only two small patches of herbs. I am thinking of buying a large pot with pockets around it and filling the pockets with herbs. Do you think that would work?

I will be sure I have Romain. Also, swiss chard can stand the heat.

I hope to have staggered plantings and to get at least two crops of cool weather produce. The Brussel sprouts do very well in our winter. The first year I planted them near fall and they got covered with bugs so I didn't harvest them. After a freeze, the bugs were gone and the Brussel sprouts were delicious.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on April 23rd, 2017, 5:31 pm 

Athena » April 23rd, 2017, 11:38 am wrote:Laugh, what's not to like is the taste of flowers.

I'm not mad keen on dandelion flowers, either - except in wine. I sometimes use the very youngest leaves sparingly. Eh, pee comes off in the wash and rinse; so long as there's no nuclear fallout or asbestos....
Nasturtium flowers taste peppery; mustard flowers are even spicier; day-lilies and squash blooms are bland, but the one is nice pickled or stir-fried in the bud and other, fried in batter when full grown. Delicate ones like violet and pansy are hardly worth the bother of picking, they've go no meat on 'em, but look nice on cakes.

Do you use your dill?

I've never seen a dill pickle without! In my youth, a favourite dish was vegetable marrow (white summer squash, which is more substantial than the spaghetti type), which my mother always cooked with sour cream and finely chopped dill. Unfortunately, my partner has hated it the same length of time I've liked it, so we compromise with parsley - not as interesting.

Pot with pockets... Do you think that would work?

I got one as a present once. It looked really good, and the young herbs did all right, but the earthenware pot - too large and heavy to bring inside - cracked in the winter. The earth freezes and expands ... unless you maybe let it dry out before hard frost... But that means no perennials, like rosemary and thyme. Thyme is a favourite; very good on mushroom dishes. I don't know how to use hyssop or lavender; don't like chamomile and rosemary is hit or miss, but the common basic herbs: parsley, sage, oregano, basil, dill and thyme have become indispensable in both of our culinary repertoires.

Also, swiss chard can stand the heat.

It can stand anything. It also tastes more like a weed than most weeds.
Naw, I'm just intolerant of strong greens since my taste-buds got zapped.

The Brussel sprouts do very well in our winter.

*Sigh!* I've never had a crop of them - or artichoke or broccoli.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on April 24th, 2017, 12:19 pm 

For sure speaking of what to grow leads to what we enjoy eating and recipes. I am really getting into squashes, but can't do them this year. Gosh, it hurts to really want something I can not have, like plenty of squash growing my own plot. But maybe I could get away with summer squash because the bugs come late?

I think we have the garden pretty full, or will have when our own starts are ready to be transplanted. We will do as many peppers as we can and tomatoes of course. We have determined the stomach pain I had was not an ulcer so I can eat red tomatoes. I already planted a yellow tomato because it is lower in acid.

Why not Brussel sprouts, artichoke or broccoli? I always plant plenty of broccoli and love it raw or cooked. I chopped out my artichoke because it shade my garden too much and I really don't like artichoke that much. I eat maybe one a year when they are in season. I am sad that my asparagus has not returned. I was getting more and more if it every year.

Swiss chard may not be the best flavor but it is great when the spinach and lettuce die in the heat. The swiss chard I have has survived a couple of years and is all volunteer now. Even if a good freeze gets it, it has come back in the spring.

This weekend two sunny days in a row are predicted. Hurray! We will have rain until then and I hope it won't be too much rain. I think a need a week of sunshine to dry out my plot and I am so restless, I may die if I can't in my garden. I may have to just keep buying soil and adding to the top. I wish I had more money. Then I would just call for a truckload of soil and pile it on high.

Any idea for keeping #&((^%%$#@ grass out?! my plot is bordered by the kind of grass that spreads by roots. I have dug it out repeatedly and paid young men to dig it out, and of course, it returns. I am paying to use this plot and think the city should cover the paths to reduce the grass problem. I have covered areas around my plot with bark mulch, and the grass laughs at my efforts to hold it at bay.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on April 24th, 2017, 8:47 pm 

Athena » April 24th, 2017, 11:19 am wrote: I already planted a yellow tomato because it is lower in acid.

Yellows are good. We also find some of the heritage varieties, like Cherokee purple and Brandywine less acidic than the hybrid reds. I particularly like bananlegs for its hardiness and long season. But the best low acid tomato of all is White Beauty, because it has a dense texture and doesn't run down your arm when noshing in the groves.
(I hate juice on my wrist!)

Why not Brussel sprouts, artichoke or broccoli?

I don't know. They fail to thrive, and I've never figured out what goes wrong - besides bugs'n'slugs. I've tried starting them from seed and buying them late in spring - no use. Can't grow cabbage, either, but that doesn't bother me. Maybe our soil is inimical to brassicas.
I don't miss the artichoke, but would dearly love to grow broccoli and Brussels. I may try broccolini this year - shorter growing season. It won't have the nice thick stems, though, which are so good, julianned, in coleslaw, stir-fry and won ton.

Swiss chard may not be the best flavor but it is great when the spinach and lettuce die in the heat.

My fall-back is kale.
I wish I had more money. Then I would just call for a truckload of soil and pile it on high.

If you ever do, be vigilant! We got hosed a few years ago. Paid $145 up front and what they dumped (in the wrong place) turned out to contain a lot of mulched garbage. Since then, for starters, we buy a few bags of soil at Loblaws, then recycle it to the outside garden.

Any idea for keeping #&((^%%$#@ grass out?!

Switch-grass, with rhizomes? No, in 30 years I've never won more than a couple of rounds against that devil. Double-dug the herb bed and inserted that corrugated plastic stuff (Restore $2 a roll) all around. Looked good the first season; all grass by the end of the second. Mostly, I pitchfork an pull, rake and pull, hoe and pull, cultivate and pull.... It comes back.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on May 6th, 2017, 12:52 pm 

Serpent » April 24th, 2017, 6:47 pm wrote: Yellows are good. We also find some of the heritage varieties, like Cherokee purple and Brandywine less acidic than the hybrid reds. I particularly like bananlegs for its hardiness and long season. But the best low acid tomato of all is White Beauty, because it has a dense texture and doesn't run down your arm when noshing in the groves.
(I hate juice on my wrist!)


I have never seen White Beauty tomatoes. Where did you get yours?

I don't know. They fail to thrive, and I've never figured out what goes wrong - besides bugs'n'slugs. I've tried starting them from seed and buying them late in spring - no use. Can't grow cabbage, either, but that doesn't bother me. Maybe our soil is inimical to brassicas.
I don't miss the artichoke, but would dearly love to grow broccoli and Brussels. I may try broccolini this year - shorter growing season. It won't have the nice thick stems, though, which are so good, julianned, in coleslaw, stir-fry and won ton.


For sure vegetables grow differently in different areas. It is amazing how one field can produce an abundance of something, and in another area, the same vegetable just doesn't do well.

Trying to figure out the soil thing is a challenge for me. I bought a kit for testing PH and it didn't work well for me. I couldn't figure it out.

I have been burying compost in my plot and know that depletes nitrogen, so this year I don't think I will do that. I have chicken manure this year. In the past, I lived on farm property and there was a chicken coop full of aged chicken shit. I got very good results with that.

My fall-back is kale.


We are planting kale.

Switch-grass, with rhizomes? No, in 30 years I've never won more than a couple of rounds against that devil. Double-dug the herb bed and inserted that corrugated plastic stuff (Restore $2 a roll) all around. Looked good the first season; all grass by the end of the second. Mostly, I pitchfork an pull, rake and pull, hoe and pull, cultivate and pull.... It comes back.


You know that is not encouraging at all! The folks who have their gardens in boxes seem to do better than mine that is level with the grass, but still, they have grass to deal with. Spending money to keep the grass out and getting grass anyway is discouraging. I guess the pitchfork is the best way to go.

Laugh, gardening can remind a person of the story about being thrown out of the Garden of Eden. There are so many enemies to a good garden. In the beginning, I didn't realize how many things can go wrong. The grass and bugs are the worst! Especially in the herbs and plants like rhubarb and asparagus that should not need replanting. I have destroyed those plants trying to get the grass out.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 1:27 pm 

Trees with nests if the new owners of this property will stop cutting them down. :-(
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on May 6th, 2017, 2:22 pm 

Athena » May 6th, 2017, 11:52 am wrote:I have never seen White Beauty tomatoes. Where did you get yours?

We mail-order most of our seeds from Vesey's https://veseys.com/ca/en/store/vegetables/tomato?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=BSE%20-%20CA%20-%20Generic%20-%20Vegetable%20Seeds&utm_term=%2Btomato%20%2Bseeds&utm_content=BSEGVS%20-%20Tomato%20Seeds
But there are plenty of American nurseries that carry it. Too late for seed this year, of course. Bedding plants are sometimes available at the more comprehensive greenhouses, or maybe farmer's markets at the end of May.

Trying to figure out the soil thing is a challenge for me. I bought a kit for testing PH and it didn't work well for me. I couldn't figure it out.

Pink is for boys, blue is for girls... or... ? Most plants do okay in the yellow-green range; hydrangeas actually reflect the litmus test in their blooms. When you buy seeds or seedlings, the instructions may say whether they like acid or alkaline soil, but don't show you the ideal pH colour.
Rodale may help with that, too, and how to correct the soil acidity.
But there are so many other factors: nutrients, drainage, sand-to-humus ratio, hard or soft pack, minerals, soil flora, temperature, and so on. I'm just guessing most of the time: if it looks and smells good to me, I expect the plants to like it.
PS legumes bind nitrogen. I always plant beans, peas or soy in depleted soil, mulch and dig in the green parts after harvesting.

Laugh, gardening can remind a person of the story about being thrown out of the Garden of Eden.

... cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life;
18 Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field;
19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground

And yet, those of us who live or have lived in cities, where bread and herbs came wrapped in cellophane, yearned for the sun and rain on on our heads, the dirt on our hands, the black-fly bites and piles of composting weed... Hoomons! (as Quark would say)
Last edited by Serpent on May 6th, 2017, 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on May 6th, 2017, 2:39 pm 

vivian maxine » May 6th, 2017, 12:27 pm wrote:Trees with nests if the new owners of this property will stop cutting them down. :-(

Can't you make them hold off?
One time, we had to wait two month before we could tear down an old, rotten structure behind the studio.
A pair of swallows had made their nest in the rafters, and they put up such a valiant defence of their home, it should have converted even a dyed-in-the-wool creationist. No mistaking the emotions or motives or strategy behind the actions of those wee creatures. Anyway, we waited until the baby swallows were fledged - and had the privilege to witness their flight training on our roof.

The last three years, we've had no swallows at all, only two pairs of robins and not many starlings. Full complement of red-winged blackbirds, blue jays and grackles; I'm hoping to see young cardinals again; last year, the resident couple raised two chicks.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 2:48 pm 

Athena, many of your garden shops - the truly professional ones who know their business - will test a sample of your soil for you. Also those who sell trees. They are very fussy about where they put their trees. And my father used to get his soil tested at a farmers' group whose name I've long since forgotten. All small towns (farming communiteis, that is) had them. Maybe someone here knows. I only remember that it was three initials. Or, think it was. They sell feed, sometimes branch out to farm supplies, sell chicks in springtime. Just some of the things they do. Try a farming community.

Thinking further, do you have an agricultural college nearby? I don't know that they do such but no harm in asking.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 2:57 pm 

Serpent, not these people. They just laugh and go on about their business. I won't even start to give you some of the silly reasons they give for cutting them down. You wouldn't believe it. Just one: Along the front of the property, is a highway. Not a huge highway - four lanes and busy. We had a beautiful stand of trees there. One was dead but the others were fine. Tall and stately. They had to come down so drivers will see the complex and know we have apartments for rent. I almost told them about autopilot driving but thought best to keep my mouth shut. Some people you can talk to; some you cannot. Best to learn which early in life?
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Serpent on May 6th, 2017, 6:22 pm 

Gaaaah!
Some people are just total... um... can you use that language here?

Those trees were standing between the tenants' lungs and the highway fumes. As well as generally contributing to air quality, temperature control and erosion.

See why I'm a curmudgeon?
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on May 8th, 2017, 12:50 pm 

vivian maxine » May 6th, 2017, 12:57 pm wrote:Serpent, not these people. They just laugh and go on about their business. I won't even start to give you some of the silly reasons they give for cutting them down. You wouldn't believe it. Just one: Along the front of the property, is a highway. Not a huge highway - four lanes and busy. We had a beautiful stand of trees there. One was dead but the others were fine. Tall and stately. They had to come down so drivers will see the complex and know we have apartments for rent. I almost told them about autopilot driving but thought best to keep my mouth shut. Some people you can talk to; some you cannot. Best to learn which early in life?


That is horrifying! In my community, cutting down a tree is next to murder. The city better have darn good reasons for removing a tree, or protesters will line the street and make life difficult for those attempting to remove trees. We have had pretty intense confrontations between the police and tree lovers.

On the other hand, if you want to cut down a tree on your own property, you better get permission, or you will get a huge fine. I have a friend who lives along a river and he has to be very careful. He has to remove seedlings before they become noticeable trees if he is going to protect his view of the river. Another gentleman who lives on a hill enjoyed his view of the city when he bought his property. He now has no view of the city because the trees are so dense and tall. I think in such cases there needs to be more compromise. I do not like living in apartments so surrounded with trees that my apartment is dark all the time. I moved out of an apartment that never got sunlight, and the pine needles were always getting tracked into my home.

We have been doing more tree removal because we have been experiencing more tree damage. I have never been aware of the tree damage that we have had in recent years. Ice and wind have left my community looking like a battle zone. I fear for the homeless folks who hide in the trees along a river path because so many trees have fallen. One man bragged about having self-pruning trees, after one bout of bad weather.

While we are speaking of trees, I vaguely remember something about them improving soil. Some farmers use trees for soil conservation, but it is more than this, the tree routes can also nourish the soil or something like that.

One more thing, I think every highway should be lined by trees because they make morning and evening driving safer. They prevent us from being blinded by the sun. That protects walking people and children, bicyclist, other drivers.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on May 8th, 2017, 12:58 pm 

vivian maxine » May 6th, 2017, 12:48 pm wrote:Athena, many of your garden shops - the truly professional ones who know their business - will test a sample of your soil for you. Also those who sell trees. They are very fussy about where they put their trees. And my father used to get his soil tested at a farmers' group whose name I've long since forgotten. All small towns (farming communiteis, that is) had them. Maybe someone here knows. I only remember that it was three initials. Or, think it was. They sell feed, sometimes branch out to farm supplies, sell chicks in springtime. Just some of the things they do. Try a farming community.

Thinking further, do you have an agricultural college nearby? I don't know that they do such but no harm in asking.


I live in farm and timber country. Just down the road a high school had a super great farming program and some idiot decided the high school had to be like all the other high schools for technology, and the farming program was dropped. Much further north is a college for agriculture, but I don't want to go that far. However, I think you are right about someone who would help with the soil testing.

Idea! I will communicate this need to the manager of the community gardening program. She is very pro-active and she might find the connection we need to test our soil.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby vivian maxine on May 8th, 2017, 1:00 pm 

The tree roots hold the soil in place. That is probably the other thing you are thinking of. One reason for disastrous mud slides is people clearing land down a hill so they can have a view from up above. Nothing to hold the soil back.

As for here, despite county laws, we are in an unincorporated area with four cities around us. It seems nothing applies to us. We know. We've tried. That highway is a state highway but they skip over us whenever they do repairs. Jump from the city to our west to the city to our east.

Some battles you just can't win and I've grown weary of fighting. Just make the best of things. Guess I'm a quitter.
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Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on May 8th, 2017, 1:17 pm 

Serpent » May 6th, 2017, 12:22 pm wrote:
Athena » May 6th, 2017, 11:52 am wrote:I have never seen White Beauty tomatoes. Where did you get yours?

We mail-order most of our seeds from Vesey's https://veseys.com/ca/en/store/vegetables/tomato?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=BSE%20-%20CA%20-%20Generic%20-%20Vegetable%20Seeds&utm_term=%2Btomato%20%2Bseeds&utm_content=BSEGVS%20-%20Tomato%20Seeds
But there are plenty of American nurseries that carry it. Too late for seed this year, of course. Bedding plants are sometimes available at the more comprehensive greenhouses, or maybe farmer's markets at the end of May.

Trying to figure out the soil thing is a challenge for me. I bought a kit for testing PH and it didn't work well for me. I couldn't figure it out.

Pink is for boys, blue is for girls... or... ? Most plants do okay in the yellow-green range; hydrangeas actually reflect the litmus test in their blooms. When you buy seeds or seedlings, the instructions may say whether they like acid or alkaline soil, but don't show you the ideal pH colour.
Rodale may help with that, too, and how to correct the soil acidity.
But there are so many other factors: nutrients, drainage, sand-to-humus ratio, hard or soft pack, minerals, soil flora, temperature, and so on. I'm just guessing most of the time: if it looks and smells good to me, I expect the plants to like it.
PS legumes bind nitrogen. I always plant beans, peas or soy in depleted soil, mulch and dig in the green parts after harvesting.

Laugh, gardening can remind a person of the story about being thrown out of the Garden of Eden.

... cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life;
18 Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field;
19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground

And yet, those of us who live or have lived in cities, where bread and herbs came wrapped in cellophane, yearned for the sun and rain on on our heads, the dirt on our hands, the black-fly bites and piles of composting weed... Hoomons! (as Quark would say)


I love your explanation of our sorrow and how that sorrow turns to joy when we live with an abundance of food in the city and yearn to return to nature. I think the bible tends to be pretty negative about nature and our place in the scheme of things.

I may have to move because the city I live in is growing too much. We are still well connected with nature, but the population density is crowding me. I am a nature and solitude lover. I love walking along the river! I feel so fortunate to have such beautiful nature all around me, but the traffic noise is hard to ignore.

I live off a drainage channel that is alive with critters and the community garden down the road is also right along the channel. We have opossum, raccoons, nutria, a river otter, beaver, ducks, and other birds and butterflies, sometimes deer walk through, and we have had flocks of wild turkeys visit us. The community garden is fenced in, and I doubt we could have gardens without fences.
Athena
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Posts: 1634
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


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