Gardening: What are you growing ?

A place to sit back, relax, get to know each other, and talk about whatever you want to discuss or share with the group.
Forum rules
Please be sure to check the Rules & Guidelines

Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 1:33 am 

Eclogite » April 17th, 2015, 8:57 am wrote:As a committed tree-hugging liberal I am greatly concerned about biodiversity. Therefore I have devoted the greater part of my 1 1/2 acres to weeds, of which I have an astounding variety, plus a couple of rogue potatoes. The butterflies love it.



You might throw some swiss chard in there. Swiss chard is a very hardy plant, enduring heat and cold, and it will crowd out other plants. You can grow it year round and it seeds itself. Like once you plant it, you will have forever. It is great in soups and salads, or anything that you use spinach for.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 1:35 am 

Braininvat » April 17th, 2015, 9:10 am wrote:Haha! I like the mental picture "rogue potato" gives me. Yeah, I have tried the biodiversity rationale for not weeding and mowing, but some anonymous neighbor narked on me to the city and I was given one week to mow or they would send a crew to do it and charge me a hefty price. Fascists.

seriously, I would like to someday, as time permits, rip up the non-native fescue and establish some hardy native groundcover (semi-arid climate here) that knows how to take care of itself.


Some cactus plants are edible.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 1:37 am 

Braininvat » April 28th, 2015, 8:15 am wrote:Aloe to you too, mate!



That is funny.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 25th, 2015, 9:40 am 

Athena » June 25th, 2015, 1:37 am wrote:
Braininvat » April 28th, 2015, 8:15 am wrote:Aloe to you too, mate!



That is funny.


As you've noticed, we're also growing healthy crop of punsters in here.

After absorbing enough nutrients in the form of linguistic alley oops and literary gimmes, they reproduce by a combination of cellular mitosis and asexual budding. Once they reach asexual maturity we humanely snuff them by slipping a plastic bag over their heads and taking them for a ride. Then we gut em, bleed em, shave em, debone em, rinse em, tickle them (to be sure they're dead), and then we add plenty of salt and Jamaican jerk seasoning, and eventually we get some genuflect-worthy jerk jerky outta the jerks. It's an artisanal labor of love, and an ode to old fashioned charcuterie.

j/k (8-P~~
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 25th, 2015, 1:24 pm 

You might throw some swiss chard in there. Swiss chard is a very hardy plant, enduring heat and cold, and it will crowd out other plants. You can grow it year round and it seeds itself. Like once you plant it, you will have forever. It is great in soups and salads, or anything that you use spinach for.


I hadn't thought of that. I'll add this to my garden. Thanks.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 10:00 pm 

Darby » June 25th, 2015, 7:40 am wrote:
Athena » June 25th, 2015, 1:37 am wrote:
Braininvat » April 28th, 2015, 8:15 am wrote:Aloe to you too, mate!



That is funny.


As you've noticed, we're also growing healthy crop of punsters in here.

After absorbing enough nutrients in the form of linguistic alley oops and literary gimmes, they reproduce by a combination of cellular mitosis and asexual budding. Once they reach asexual maturity we humanely snuff them by slipping a plastic bag over their heads and taking them for a ride. Then we gut em, bleed em, shave em, debone em, rinse em, tickle them (to be sure they're dead), and then we add plenty of salt and Jamaican jerk seasoning, and eventually we get some genuflect-worthy jerk jerky outta the jerks. It's an artisanal labor of love, and an ode to old fashioned charcuterie.

j/k (8-P~~


I am not at all sure of what you said, but it you said what I think you said, that is very artful and very funny.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 10:11 pm 

Watson » June 25th, 2015, 11:24 am wrote:
You might throw some swiss chard in there. Swiss chard is a very hardy plant, enduring heat and cold, and it will crowd out other plants. You can grow it year round and it seeds itself. Like once you plant it, you will have forever. It is great in soups and salads, or anything that you use spinach for.


I hadn't thought of that. I'll add this to my garden. Thanks.


We are into 90 to 100 degree weather, and I am not sure what this is going to do my garden. I still have a lot of lettuce. I am enjoying learning about lettuce. What endures heat better than others varieties. Which varieties are much more fibrous. Which varieties last the longest in my refrigerator. As usual I planted way too much lettuce, and I can't eat it fast enough. After living on salads for several days, I get to the point where I can not choke down another bite of lettuce, and I have to glut myself with meat.

But ah ha, the swiss chard. It freezes nicely! I am so glad it has seeded itself and I will continue to have plenty of it. I look to forward to pulling it out of the freezer and putting it soups this winter.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 25th, 2015, 10:38 pm 

I'm not a forager, but I have found some oyster mushrooms on near by public lands, then next door and now in my back yard. The first two were on the shade side of healthy local ash trees. My yard is a dead Russian ash stump, with them growing on the sunny side. And more pale and delicious than the others.
In this last case I harvested the soft shroom hoping the woody parts will continue to grow and I pushed some more material into the bark to propagate more growth. I don't know if either will work. I also found some brown mushrooms in the shade of a wood compost. I should try and control where these things grow, because it is a nice flavor on the plate.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 25th, 2015, 11:01 pm 

I am not at all sure of what you said, but it you said what I think you said, that is very artful and very funny.


That was the intent ... to be artfully funny. ;^)

Just for a little background context, I used to (among many other endeavors) help run a writer's forum some years back, where we took great fun at taking good natured creative pokes at one another whilst carrying on the conversational thread at hand. It was sort of a writer's analog of hacky sack. It's a shame that a lot of the posts from that time frame got garbled in a slightly buggy forum migration, otherwise I'd link a few amusing samples.

Ok, back on topic ...
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 25th, 2015, 11:08 pm 

Watson » June 25th, 2015, 10:38 pm wrote:I'm not a forager, but I have found some oyster mushrooms on near by public lands, then next door and now in my back yard. The first two were on the shade side of healthy local ash trees. My yard is a dead Russian ash stump, with them growing on the sunny side. And more pale and delicious than the others.
In this last case I harvested the soft shroom hoping the woody parts will continue to grow and I pushed some more material into the bark to propagate more growth. I don't know if either will work. I also found some brown mushrooms in the shade of a wood compost. I should try and control where these things grow, because it is a nice flavor on the plate.


I adore mushrooms, and regularly use them in omlets, quesedillas and on pizza.

I preserve them by chopping and browning/reducing them, then confit them in clarified butter. They keep for several months that way, in the fridge. It's a good technique ... I can post photos if anyone's interested.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 25th, 2015, 11:21 pm 

I was told that the edible ones are the ones with the gills on the underside. Any thoughts? I usually taste a small sample, and if I don't die I try more, until I think they must be safe. But they must smell good and look good before they get the small bit of a taste test.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 11:29 pm 

Watson » June 25th, 2015, 8:38 pm wrote:I'm not a forager, but I have found some oyster mushrooms on near by public lands, then next door and now in my back yard. The first two were on the shade side of healthy local ash trees. My yard is a dead Russian ash stump, with them growing on the sunny side. And more pale and delicious than the others.
In this last case I harvested the soft shroom hoping the woody parts will continue to grow and I pushed some more material into the bark to propagate more growth. I don't know if either will work. I also found some brown mushrooms in the shade of a wood compost. I should try and control where these things grow, because it is a nice flavor on the plate.


We have a lot of mushrooms or toadstools that grow spontaneously here and there, but these things seem have a mind of their own, appear one year and not the next.

I am so afraid of eating the wrong mushroom and don't eat any of them unless I buy them out of the store!

However, one year I found a particularly pretty one and pick it, hoping it would reproduce on the property where I live. I have lost hope of ever seeing it again.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 25th, 2015, 11:30 pm 

Watson » June 25th, 2015, 11:21 pm wrote:I was told that the edible ones are the ones with the gills on the underside. Any thoughts? I usually taste a small sample, and if I don't die I try more, until I think they must be safe. But they must smell good and look good before they get the small bit of a taste test.


Assuming you're not kidding ... most mushrooms have gills, so that's not a good test.

There are many toxic varieties of mushrooms out there ... probably at least 2 bad ones for every good one. I recommend exercising caution with wild mushrooms, unless you really know what you're doing. At the very least get a few good books on the subject, and carefully check anything you plant to consume to be sure it's edible and doesnt have any toxic look-alikes. Better still, check your local advertising for local mushroom experts who give foraging tours, and bring a sample for identification.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 25th, 2015, 11:45 pm 

Darby » June 25th, 2015, 9:08 pm wrote:
Watson » June 25th, 2015, 10:38 pm wrote:I'm not a forager, but I have found some oyster mushrooms on near by public lands, then next door and now in my back yard. The first two were on the shade side of healthy local ash trees. My yard is a dead Russian ash stump, with them growing on the sunny side. And more pale and delicious than the others.
In this last case, I harvested the soft shroom hoping the woody parts will continue to grow and I pushed some more material into the bark to propagate more growth. I don't know if either will work. I also found some brown mushrooms in the shade of a wood compost. I should try and control where these things grow because it is a nice flavor on the plate.


I adore mushrooms and regularly use them in omlets, quesedillas and on pizza.

I preserve them by chopping and browning/reducing them, then confit them in clarified butter. They keep for several months that way, in the fridge. It's a good technique ... I can post photos if anyone's interested.



Perhaps I will try this? Even though I eat my mushrooms fairly soon after buying them, often they are not in such good condition when I eat the last of them.

My grandson wanted to experiment with decaying food, so we cut up a carrot and left one unwrapped in the refrigerator, one wrapped in the refrigerator, and then one in a small open glass, one in vinegar and one in water. It is impressive that keeping the air off perishables seems the most important thing to do. He is most fascinated with the one in water. That one looks and feels good, but the water around it is milky. The ones that are just shriveling up are not interesting to him.

Anyway, I can understand how the butter would make a protective coating and preserve the mushrooms. Which brings to a question.

How dead is dead? Because of gardening I have veggies sitting around for a long time, sometimes months. It is fascinating to me, that a squash can be fine for months, and then a mold starts to grow and the decay goes pretty fast from that point. It seems obvious the veggie or fruit, can ward off decay up to a point. Not having schooling in such matters, it seems to me a picked veggie or fruit is still living, until that moment when decay consumes its life.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 26th, 2015, 12:17 am 

Assuming you're not kidding ...

Not kidding, hence the question. It sounded suspicious at the time, and not a source I was inclined to trust.


I was wondering if acorn squash needs to ripen more because some are bland, and others looking much the same are much more flavorful.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 26th, 2015, 8:41 am 

How dead is dead? Because of gardening I have veggies sitting around for a long time, sometimes months. It is fascinating to me, that a squash can be fine for months, and then a mold starts to grow and the decay goes pretty fast from that point. It seems obvious the veggie or fruit, can ward off decay up to a point. Not having schooling in such matters, it seems to me a picked veggie or fruit is still living, until that moment when decay consumes its life.


The primary (but not sole) vector for rot/decay is the ability of invading bacteria to grow and reproduce in watery/damaged cell tissues. Accordingly, the higher the moisture content, the weaker the cell structures, the faster the process of bacterial growth and decomposition can occur ... thus, something moist and delicate like a ripe tomato with a nick in its skin can start rotting overnight, whereas a tough thick skinned winter squash or gourd can last weeks or even several months at room temperature, if the skin is kept unblemished and the stem was properly cut and dried. That dry hard rind acts like a fortress wall against bacterial invasion.

Other inhibitors against bacterial invasion and premature spoilage are exterior wax (such as the kind applied to to things like apples and turnips in supermarkets), cold (which also slows ripening as well as the rate of bacterial reproduction and motility), sulfite (usually applied to dried fruits), and various types of salts (used in charcuterie for things like pickles, cured meats, etc), smoke, etc.

Getting back to confit ... the technique, for musrooms, is to clean, chop and slice mushrooms, then cook/reduce/brown them in some butter to kill any bacteria present and remove most of the water (read: bacterial reproduction vector), then you salt/season them to taste (the salt helps preserve them), then you place them piping hot into jars just large enough to hold them all, then top them up with hot clarified butter, with displaces all the air throughout the jar and forms a cap just below the lid. A few pokes with a chopstick or ice pick helps encourage any pockets of air to bubble to the surface, then you lock the lid and refrigerate it. Once solidified, the butter serves as a barrier against spoilage by taking away the opportunity for bacteria to reproduce in a friendly liquid medium. If the cap is undamaged, the confit can last weeks or months in the fridge ... but once you cut into it, you should use it up with a few weeks, at most.

Figure that 1 lb of mushrooms yeilds about 1 cup of mushroom confit. As for seasonings (besides salt), I like a little ground pepper, a whisper of thyme, and just a touch of worchestershire sauce.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 26th, 2015, 8:59 am 

Watson » June 26th, 2015, 12:17 am wrote:I was wondering if acorn squash needs to ripen more because some are bland, and others looking much the same are much more flavorful.


Definitely do not trust any varieties of mushrooms in the wild that you are not already intimately familiar with. IMHO, all mushroom varities have a one time admission fee of research to be paid before consumption.

For acorn squash, unlike tomatoes I dont think they ripen off the vine, so if you encounter some that seem overly mild and undersweet, they were most likely picked too early before they got placed in prolonged culinary cold storage enroute to market.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on June 26th, 2015, 11:33 am 

More on mushroom confit ... I actually use homemade ghee in place of clarified butter. Dirt simple to make ... just melt and simmer butter until all the whey boils off, and the milk solids begin to caramelize, then decant the clarified butter off the golden brown solids, and mop up the latter with some toasted bread. Done properly, it takes about 30-40 mins - a one pound block of unsalted butter yields about 10-12 fl oz of ghee. No skimming required ... just the occasional stir. TIP: You gotta watch it like a hawk towards the end though, because one the last of the whey is gone, the temp rises rapidly and the milk solids begin to brown in a hurry, so it's easy to scorch.

This probably belongs in the culinary thread, but oh well.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 26th, 2015, 8:35 pm 

The suash I planted the other day have appeared and I just planted some swiss chard seeds, and a couple of red pepper plants just ready to start flowering.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 26th, 2015, 8:44 pm 

Darby » June 26th, 2015, 6:41 am wrote:
How dead is dead? Because of gardening I have veggies sitting around for a long time, sometimes months. It is fascinating to me, that a squash can be fine for months, and then a mold starts to grow and the decay goes pretty fast from that point. It seems obvious the veggie or fruit, can ward off decay up to a point. Not having schooling in such matters, it seems to me a picked veggie or fruit is still living, until that moment when decay consumes its life.


The primary (but not sole) vector for rot/decay is the ability of invading bacteria to grow and reproduce in watery/damaged cell tissues. Accordingly, the higher the moisture content, the weaker the cell structures, the faster the process of bacterial growth and decomposition can occur ... thus, something moist and delicate like a ripe tomato with a nick in its skin can start rotting overnight, whereas a tough thick skinned winter squash or gourd can last weeks or even several months at room temperature, if the skin is kept unblemished and the stem was properly cut and dried. That dry hard rind acts like a fortress wall against bacterial invasion.

Other inhibitors against bacterial invasion and premature spoilage are exterior wax (such as the kind applied to to things like apples and turnips in supermarkets), cold (which also slows ripening as well as the rate of bacterial reproduction and motility), sulfite (usually applied to dried fruits), and various types of salts (used in charcuterie for things like pickles, cured meats, etc), smoke, etc.

Getting back to confit ... the technique, for musrooms, is to clean, chop and slice mushrooms, then cook/reduce/brown them in some butter to kill any bacteria present and remove most of the water (read: bacterial reproduction vector), then you salt/season them to taste (the salt helps preserve them), then you place them piping hot into jars just large enough to hold them all, then top them up with hot clarified butter, with displaces all the air throughout the jar and forms a cap just below the lid. A few pokes with a chopstick or ice pick helps encourage any pockets of air to bubble to the surface, then you lock the lid and refrigerate it. Once solidified, the butter serves as a barrier against spoilage by taking away the opportunity for bacteria to reproduce in a friendly liquid medium. If the cap is undamaged, the confit can last weeks or months in the fridge ... but once you cut into it, you should use it up with a few weeks, at most.

Figure that 1 lb of mushrooms yeilds about 1 cup of mushroom confit. As for seasonings (besides salt), I like a little ground pepper, a whisper of thyme, and just a touch of worchestershire sauce.


I am familiar with canning and have seen meat packed in lard, but never thought of using butter for mushrooms. I very much appreciate your explanations of decay and preservation.

Do you happen to know how we might give our squashes a coating of wax?

And for being self-sufficient and preserving food, if I had land I would have a root cellar.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 26th, 2015, 8:56 pm 

Watson » June 26th, 2015, 6:35 pm wrote:The suash I planted the other day have appeared and I just planted some swiss chard seeds, and a couple of red pepper plants just ready to start flowering.


I bought parsley seeds, but they will have to wait. I want some Brussels sprouts starts and some kale. As popular as kale is, I am amazed I am having so much trouble finding seeds for it!

This is clearly off topic, but my day was devoted to reorganizing my library. My grandson moved book shelves for me, and I have some books on the shelves. I still have a lot to do, but, already I really like the change. It would be even better if I could let go of a few boxes of books.

Anyway, that is why I didn't do anything in the garden, but I did buy some soaker hoses and I am excited about trying them. My least favorite thing to do is stand in the heat and water the garden. I have to walk the dog before it gets too hot, and by then it is uncomfortably warm. I hope with the soaker hoses, I can water my plot and walk my dog at the same time.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 26th, 2015, 9:08 pm 

Watson » June 26th, 2015, 6:35 pm wrote:The squash I planted the other day have appeared and I just planted some swiss chard seeds, and a couple of red pepper plants just ready to start flowering.


I brought in my first summer squash yesterday. I need to blanch my broccoli and get it in the freezer. Laugh, already I can't eat the food fast enough. I am still eating lettuce, lettuce and more lettuce. And I need to eat the last of the pea soup that isn't frozen. My great grandson helped with the peas, so I froze some pea soup to share with him.

I planted the regular peas in a pod this year. I like the sugar peas that can be eaten pod and all, but they soured in my freezer last your, so I didn't plant them this year. I am quite sure I froze them without blanching them. Whatever, they were yuk when I tried to use what I had frozen.

Hey! I have a berry plant that looks like blackberry, but it is something else, and the problem is the bush is growing huge, but I had only one berry! I don't have room for something that doesn't produce. Any suggestions?
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 26th, 2015, 9:45 pm 

May be it needs nutrients for berries. Take a sample to your local garden center and see what fertilizer they suggest? And maybe trim it back. If all energy is going to support the heavy growth, maybe less so going into berries.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 30th, 2015, 1:26 pm 

The first two strawberries were ready to eat. They were so sweet and juicy with a very soft texture. Only three plants have berries at this point, so I guess I'll just be getting the odd treat, instead of a harvest. I noticed the plants send out a runner to start a new plant, but I see the runner gives a new plant, but the runner continues on to give a third plant about every foot or so.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on June 30th, 2015, 2:20 pm 

Watson » June 30th, 2015, 11:26 am wrote:The first two strawberries were ready to eat. They were so sweet and juicy with a very soft texture. Only three plants have berries at this point, so I guess I'll just be getting the odd treat, instead of a harvest. I noticed the plants send out a runner to start a new plant, but I see the runner gives a new plant, but the runner continues on to give a third plant about every foot or so.


My strawberries appear done for the year. I didn't have a good harvest because my soil is poor. I added fertilizer too late. I may get a few berries later on, but not enough to really matter.

All of my strawberries are from runners. The original strawberries were in a planter that was taken over by grass, so I have covered the planter in hopes of killing the grass. Although the grass won the fight for space, the strawberries that got to the ground because of runners, have been very hardy and accept plenty of abuse such as being walked on, left dry, extremes of hot and cold weather. This is the first year I have made an effort to care for them.

Grass has been a huge problem! I have the grass that spreads by roots, and my soil was terrible when I started so all weeds have been hard to get out of the ground. After years of working on my soil, there are finally areas where weeds can be pulled out easily. The combination of hard clay soil and grass, made gardening very unpleasant. Each year I add compost from my kitchen and leaves in the fall. I have used fish and manure fertilizers. I think the compost from the kitchen has been the best for loosening up the soil, most likely because the worms like it and they process it when it is buried in the ground, faster than processing leaves. That is a guess.

I want bio char, but can't find a local source of it.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on June 30th, 2015, 3:12 pm 

I was just out moving some landscaping ties, and increasing the size of my garden, maybe by double. More room for the strawberries to grow. The village has a composting area they work and we are allowed to take what we want, so I fill a couple of garbage cans to bring home for my garden. The strawberries seem to like it.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on July 3rd, 2015, 6:33 pm 

My garden space for corn is too limited for 3 rows of 3 corn plants, and I only have 2 rows and 3 plants. This means my corn may not self-pollinate so I looked for information about pollinating my corn and thought some folks might find this interesting>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJnMtUpHXyA
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Athena on July 3rd, 2015, 6:39 pm 

Watson » June 30th, 2015, 1:12 pm wrote:I was just out moving some landscaping ties, and increasing the size of my garden, maybe by double. More room for the strawberries to grow. The village has a composting area they work and we are allowed to take what we want, so I fill a couple of garbage cans to bring home for my garden. The strawberries seem to like it.


Yeah this year I am really bummed by the lack of leafy compost. We have wood chip compost provided by the city, but I think that will make the soil too acid?

If the weather ever cools down, I may put some wood chips in a path.

However, next year, I swear I am going to horde the leafy compost from fall, so I can use it for composting after planting, to control weeds and reduce the need for water. Of course, I cover my plot with leaves in the fall.
Athena
Active Member
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Location: Eugene, Oregon


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Watson on July 3rd, 2015, 7:01 pm 

That makes it a labor intensive project but I also only have two rows, but maybe 12-15 plants, if they show themselves out of the ground. I'll refer back to that video if the seeds I planted take hold. I did the pollinating of tomatoes with a cue-tip in past years. Maybe I should be doing that as well this year. Other than tomatoes, this is my first go with a garden. Now it is about 12 x 20 feet with what I hope is nice rich composted material, about 6-8 inches on top of a more clay material. I forked over the clay and weeds first so hoping the composted cover will kill the weeds and mix with the clay giving a nice deep rich garden. I'm not expecting much this year, but hope to be in good shape for an early start next spring.
Ya I have a compost bin and I'm moving it closer to the garden area so I can make better use of it. I guess I lucky to be able to collect 3 or 4 garbage tins of compost from about 5 minutes away.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4232
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Gardening: What are you growing ?

Postby Darby on July 12th, 2015, 12:40 pm 

Tomato status:

> Sun Sugar: In full swing, and starting to yeild bountifully (4 plants are giving me about 3/4 qt every other day). I've already used them generously atop green salads, baked atop pizza, in tomato-mozz salad, and in sandwiches (bacon-tomato).
> Husky Red: Just starting to yield, but not quite in full swing yet.
> Indigo Red: Plenty of fruit set, but ripening slowly.
> Yellow Pear: Still setting fruit.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


PreviousNext

Return to Lounge Area

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests