How do I find a specific forum?

A place to sit back, relax, get to know each other, and talk about whatever you want to discuss or share with the group.
Forum rules
Please be sure to check the Rules & Guidelines

How do I find a specific forum?

Postby vivian maxine on October 6th, 2015, 12:03 pm 

"Zero tolerance for non-science", Biowizard said in his story of how Science/Philosophy Chat came to be. And rightly so. It sets the range clearly and we know what we'll get. Science or philosophy - not how good Lilian Jackson Brauns Cat Who books are. Thanks, Bio.

And that leads to my question. Knowing how to do forums, you may also know how to find forums. I have spent the morning looking for a humanities forum similar to Sci/Phil. I tried Humanities forums and every one of them was simply a news site about future meetings at given universities. I then tried "Online humanities forums"" and found one but it was limited to professional scholars and teachers. Then I tried blogs. Nothing there, of course.

I decided to limit it to Literature with the same results. There is an excellent online history forum. Also one for classical music. I'd really rather have one that brings all the humanities under one roof as you all have done with science/philosophy but not even finding individual ones is quite frustrating.

So, does anyone here know of an online humanities discussion forum that is not limited to the scholarly elite? Or, maybe just better wording to find one? I've tried all the wording I can think of.

Thank you.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: How do I find a specific forum?

Postby Natural ChemE on October 6th, 2015, 12:53 pm 

vivian maxine,

Not sure exactly what you'd like to discuss in the Humanities, but generally I'd guess that you could post such topics either in the Philosophy side of the site or this Lounge Area forum. The Lounge Area can be good for discussions on literature. Though BioWizard'll be able to tell ya better.

As a general comment about internet communities, you'll tend to find that the expression of the general population onto the internet is heavily modified by demographics' capabilities and interests. At the extreme, this means that it's super easy to find websites about computers, and other technical fields tend to be well represented (compared to their actual membership on Earth). And while non-technical folks greatly outnumber computer programmers in the general population, their nature limits their expression on the internet.

Still, there are a lot of people who like the Humanities, so you can still find communities for 'em. If you want to talk literature, my first thought it to look for online book clubs, including forums and chat rooms.

I'd note that a lot of online literature comes in the form of web comics. Web comics can have very active, invested user bases. One more graphic-novel-type one would be Girl Genius. Some of these stories shame classic literature; art's really come a long way!
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009


Re: How do I find a specific forum?

Postby mtbturtle on October 6th, 2015, 1:10 pm 

Natural ChemE » Tue Oct 06, 2015 11:53 am wrote:vivian maxine,

Not sure exactly what you'd like to discuss in the Humanities, but generally I'd guess that you could post such topics either in the Philosophy side of the site or this Lounge Area forum. The Lounge Area can be good for discussions on literature. Though BioWizard'll be able to tell ya better


Book sections or Art would suit literature but I think Vivian's question was how to find other forums similar to our own not where to post topics here.
User avatar
mtbturtle
Banned User
 
Posts: 10229
Joined: 16 Dec 2005


Re: How do I find a specific forum?

Postby Natural ChemE on October 6th, 2015, 1:21 pm 

mtbturtle,

Yeah, just trying to help find a solution. When looking for online resources, it's important to understand what exists to be found in the first place, and for that it helps to understand why certain things exist or don't. I think that knowing this stuff helps folks freely navigate and take advantage of the internet.

Anyway, if you're looking for non-technical folks who are invested in stuff like reading for fun, I'd look toward social media. My first thoughts are:
  1. Facebook groups for stuff like books.
  2. MySpace for stuff about music.
  3. WordPress and other blog sites for writing.
  4. Online picture repositories like DeviantArt for artsy stuff.
If you'd accept a mix of technical and non-technical content, some technical folks do funny things for fun. For example, there's Code Golf if you're into puzzles.
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009


Re: How do I find a specific forum?

Postby vivian maxine on October 6th, 2015, 1:33 pm 

Natural ChemE » October 6th, 2015, 11:53 am wrote:vivian maxine,

Not sure exactly what you'd like to discuss in the Humanities, but generally I'd guess that you could post such topics either in the Philosophy side of the site or this Lounge Area forum. The Lounge Area can be good for discussions on literature. Though BioWizard'll be able to tell ya better.

As a general comment about internet communities, you'll tend to find that the expression of the general population onto the internet is heavily modified by demographics' capabilities and interests. At the extreme, this means that it's super easy to find websites about computers, and other technical fields tend to be well represented (compared to their actual membership on Earth). And while non-technical folks greatly outnumber computer programmers in the general population, their nature limits their expression on the internet.

Still, there are a lot of people who like the Humanities, so you can still find communities for 'em. If you want to talk literature, my first thought it to look for online book clubs, including forums and chat rooms.

I'd note that a lot of online literature comes in the form of web comics. Web comics can have very active, invested user bases. One more graphic-novel-type one would be Girl Genius. Some of these stories shame classic literature; art's really come a long way!


Very good points. Thank you. Computers would draw the technological-minded but others should be learning to take advantage of this invention. I'll try "chat rooms" or "chat" forums. Book clubs are a good idea. All those are worth a try. My aim, though, is still to find one site for all, as mtbturtle indicates. I may be a loser on that score. We take what we can get but I shan't give up yet.

I'm not sure art has "come" a long way or "fallen" a long way. Guess I'll just say "more relaxed". That is kinder.

Thanks much.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: How do I find a specific forum?

Postby Natural ChemE on October 6th, 2015, 1:42 pm 

vivian maxine,

Definitely! And honestly, I'd just look through Facebook groups if you want discussions on fun stuff like literature.

Just to avoid any confusion over the idiom "come a long way", I mean that I think that modern art is much, much better than the classical stuff. Lots of reasons why - including a far greater population on Earth with far more wealth and far more tools to learn and conduct art with.

By contrast, classical artists are far fewer in population, had much less education, much fewer/more primitive tools, far less access to information (can you imagine not only lacking the internet, but even a decent library?!), didn't travel the world like we do today, etc. They were basically primitives beating away with the pathetic tools and extremely limited world view accessible to them. Google would've blown their minds; Microsoft Word would've changed their entire work flow; a few flights around the world would've opened up their eyes. Heck, Amazon.com could've at least provided them with all sorts of awesome art supplies on-demand while any sort of decent modern education - forget an American university education - would've shown them all new ways of thinking.

Not that you won't find snobs who get off on the idea that historical artists were somehow super-geniuses who transcended reality itself, but their core interest is in the potential to be egotistical, not in the actual art. Egotists like dead people because dead people aren't accessible. Egos are best grown in the absence of reality checks.

Anyway, long rant short, modern art is the best.
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009



Return to Lounge Area

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests

cron