Is tv a form of birth control?

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Is tv a form of birth control?

Postby Braininvat on November 9th, 2015, 10:18 am 

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Re: Is tv a form of birth control?

Postby DragonFly on November 9th, 2015, 2:09 pm 

It's very difficult to have sex on TV; you need to use one of those long, wide tvs from the old days.
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Re: Is tv a form of birth control?

Postby Braininvat on November 9th, 2015, 4:31 pm 

Thanks for reading the link.
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Re: Is tv a form of birth control?

Postby Paralith on November 9th, 2015, 10:21 pm 

Exposure to other cultural ideas, especially cultures with lower birth rates, has long been one of several hypotheses to explain the demographic transition. I think this is a bit of a "turtles all the way down" answer, though. Exposure to changes in reproductive beliefs and behaviors from other cultures requires other cultures, or in this case media creators, who already have changed their reproductive beliefs and behaviors. I have no doubt that the strength of cultural learning plays a significant part in spreading these changes, but they have to start somewhere.

I confess I only skimmed the article, but I didn't see that the authors fully addressed a very obvious correlation with tv access - the country's industrialization. An industrialized economy is one that tends to require greater and greater amounts of education before a person is skilled enough to get a job. The whole pattern of the evolution of the human life course, longer and longer childhoods, delaying reproduction until older and older ages - is because we need time to learn, to prepare, to develop the skills we'll need to become fully functioning adults in a human society. Our self-made modern environment has advanced at a speed that far outstrips the pace of biological evolution, but the "wait until we're ready" impulse is still pretty strongly expressed in a lot of people. Then add to the extra years of education the desires to build up resources, pay off student loans, acquire that house with the white picket fence, all these things that have to be done before we're "ready" to have children. And human females have a hard biological cap on the last age at which they can reproduce. They longer they wait before they start reproducing, the fewer children they can have no matter how many they may truly desire.
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