Sit Still and Read?

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Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 6th, 2016, 8:45 am 

So much for the theory that sitting still can kill you.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/08/0 ... &te=1&_r=0
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby Braininvat on August 6th, 2016, 9:33 am 

Perhaps reading helps maintain some cognitive skills, which may help longevity. Reduce depression, improve problem solving, heighten sense of being "tuned in." Or could be physiological state accompanying reading, better relaxation in the evening, etc. Or a combination of multiple benefits. Be interesting if they broke it down regarding fiction v nonfiction.
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 6th, 2016, 9:49 am 

Braininvat » August 6th, 2016, 8:33 am wrote:Perhaps reading helps maintain some cognitive skills, which may help longevity. Reduce depression, improve problem solving, heighten sense of being "tuned in." Or could be physiological state accompanying reading, better relaxation in the evening, etc. Or a combination of multiple benefits. Be interesting if they broke it down regarding fiction v nonfiction.


It lightens all the tensions that have built up during the day. You are right about breaking it down between fiction and nonfiction. And, why we choose what we choose when we choose it? Does what you decide to read tonight depend in part on how you're feeling?
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby Serpent on August 6th, 2016, 10:13 am 

For me, it always does.
I read non-fiction in the daytime - with lunch, or rest periods on the deck. Not for any purpose; just curiosity. All kinds of things I pick up at library sales: the last one was about Venice; the current one, about Van Gogh.
I read fiction in bed before sleeping, and there might be three or four books on the headboard at any given time, in case I become bored or depressed by one, I can pick up another. (Sometimes I have to start over, so much time has gone by.) The older I get, the less time I have for literature I don't enjoy. I don't want to be instructed or educated, improved or inspired: I want to be entertained and intrigued.
Joyce and Proust don't stand a chance: I'm not working at it. War and Peace, though, was a damn good read - back when I could stomach tragedy.
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 6th, 2016, 10:41 am 

Serpent wrote:I don't want to be instructed or educated, improved or inspired: I want to be entertained and intrigued.


That's when I turn to the books with cats who help solve mysteries. My friend and I have a whole list of authors that we "have to read". I send her what I found and she sends me what she found. Hard to keep a supply of boxes, though. P. O. machines are hard on boxes.

Anyway, light and easy reading just to be entertained. Yes.

Interesting that they did not include newspapers. I don't remember about magazines but I don't much enjoy those at night. Daytime for those.
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby Serpent on August 6th, 2016, 11:28 am 

I guess people read newspapers in tn the morning and before supper - or on line during the day?
I've never known anyone to read a magazine, except in waiting-rooms, months out of date.

For mailing books, I recommend padded envelopes, rather than boxes. Even just a heavt brown paper, tightly wrapped, is better. For some reason, all post offices and even couriers drop boxes on their corners. I tape down the edges of the envelope, so nothing sticks out to snag in a conveyor belt, ever since that one caught fire in the Tennessee sorting station.
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 6th, 2016, 11:45 am 

Serpent » August 6th, 2016, 10:28 am wrote:I guess people read newspapers in tn the morning and before supper - or on line during the day?
I've never known anyone to read a magazine, except in waiting-rooms, months out of date.

For mailing books, I recommend padded envelopes, rather than boxes. Even just a heavt brown paper, tightly wrapped, is better. For some reason, all post offices and even couriers drop boxes on their corners. I tape down the edges of the envelope, so nothing sticks out to snag in a conveyor belt, ever since that one caught fire in the Tennessee sorting station.


Those are good ways also. But, generally, we wait until we have a supply of books to send. Used to be able to buy boxes that magazines fit into perfectly and then stack books atop those. Then the boxes suddenly grew about five inches on each side and two inches higher. Mustn't get those boxes too heavy.
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby Serpent on August 6th, 2016, 11:59 am 

Another thing I do sometimes is make a box to fit. Using any old boxes from the grocery store, I cut them down to the size and shape into which my book(s) fit snugly, then tape down the edges.

(I work part-time at the family publishing business as a shipper. Kind of an entry/exit level position.)
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 6th, 2016, 12:06 pm 

Serpent » August 6th, 2016, 10:59 am wrote:Another thing I do sometimes is make a box to fit. Using any old boxes from the grocery store, I cut them down to the size and shape into which my book(s) fit snugly, then tape down the edges.

(I work part-time at the family publishing business as a shipper. Kind of an entry/exit level position.)


I have done that a few times but I'm not too good at it. Cutting down from the top is easy enough but length and width not os easy. I just stuff peanuts into the empty spots.

All kinds of ways to manage if we study a bit. Right?
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby Dave_Oblad on August 7th, 2016, 8:02 am 

Hi all,

For me, I read Science stuff during the day (like this forum) but at night, before bed, sometimes light reading of children's books.. very relaxing and rather fun nostalgia. My favorites are the "Space-Cat" books by Ruthven Todd:

Space-cat.jpg

I think the main reason is this series were the "FIRST" books I read as a child.. and why I became a Science Geek. I flew past "**** and Jane" Books and taught myself how to read with these stories from the School Library in 2nd Grade. They shaped my future love of Books and my outlook/interests on life in general, as I grew up.

Best regards all,
Dave :^)
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby vivian maxine on August 7th, 2016, 8:19 am 

Exactly. Then, if I have any energy left over and want something more than Joe (talking cat who leads a tribe of ferals), I pull out a historical fiction. They can be good. SicFi, too, provided it is in the realm of future possibility. Or at least closer to "normal", whatever that might be. I do not like those blood-and-gore monster scifi books.

By the way, do you suppose e-books work as well? Too much struggling with buttons?
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Re: Sit Still and Read?

Postby bangstrom on August 8th, 2016, 5:03 am 

Dave_Oblad » August 7th, 2016, 7:02 am wrote: I flew past "**** and Jane" Books and taught myself how to read with these stories from the School Library in 2nd Grade. They shaped my future love of Books and my outlook/interests on life in general, as I grew up.

I was slow in learning to read and in the first grade I deliberately decided I did not want to learn. My parents were readers and I imagined the things they read in the paper resembled the things I read in “**** and Jane.” Eisenhower played golf today. Golf, golf, golf, golf, golf. I was not inspired.

In the second grade, I discovered “Horton Hatches the Egg” and that was the first book I found worth reading. The “**** and Jane” series was horrible on several different levels.
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