communication and gender differences

Discussions on behavioral ecology, evolutionary psychology, neurology, endocrinology, game theory, etc.

Re: communication and gender differences

Postby Serpent on January 12th, 2018, 2:42 pm 

mitchellmckain » January 12th, 2018, 12:52 pm wrote:... the whole story is a bit more complex than this rather one-sided feminist complaint...

It wasn't a complaint. It was a response to the theme of the thread: I've always objected to Athena's (and anyone's!) proposed division of gender roles.
My contention is that collaboration always achieves more than division.
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Re: communication and gender differences

Postby BadgerJelly on January 12th, 2018, 5:13 pm 

Objecting to a ball being round doesn't stop it being round though.

Women give birth, men don't. There is a certain amount of psychological makeup that comes packed up with that, and several million years of evolution. Women are going to perform better a certain task in certain situations than men, and the opposite is true.

The problem we have, as scientists, is trying to figure out what is biological and what is conditional. Needless to say it's bloody complicated! haha!
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Re: communication and gender differences

Postby Serpent on January 12th, 2018, 7:18 pm 

BadgerJelly » January 12th, 2018, 4:13 pm wrote:Women give birth, men don't.

And this influences their ability to communicate? All of them, or just the parous ones? What about women who haven't given birth? Or don't want to?
The problem we have, as scientists, is trying to figure out what is biological and what is conditional.

What kind of science requires you to figure this out? What will you do with the information? The studies I cited are just a few of a great many that have already been carried out, so there is quite a lot of reliable statistical data available. What have you, as a scientist, concluded from that data? To what specific research are you contributing your findings? How will the results enhance our understanding of the world?
Objecting to a ball being round doesn't stop it being round though.

A ball is a manufactured object. Nothing in nature is. Insisting that an apple should be perfectly round won't make it so.
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Re: communication and gender differences

Postby dandelion on January 13th, 2018, 3:10 am 

BadgerJelly » January 11th, 2018, 4:19 pm wrote:I was looking at Egyptian mythology and I guess the thought struck me there. In Egyptian mythology it was not Thoth who invented writing it was Seshat.

I was thinking along the lines of hunter gathers with the men out hunting and the women being more about distributing food equally. I would imagine some form of record keeping could have more easily developed in their social role - of course it is a highly speculative suggest and has very little on its side because I was basing it on several assumptions about the prehistoric diversity of the sexes in day-to-day tasks.


Less topically I guess, I was interested in thoughts about the alphabet and actually more wondering if perhaps there is some possibility that around such time and place, considering such sorts of occurrences such as the poet’s contribution, there may have been some opportunity for more balanced contribution, e.g.,
“The adoption of alphabetic writing from the Phoenicians, and its adaptation, by the Greeks sometime in the eighth century BC, was one of the most critical developments in world history. The ramifications were almost immediate and far-reaching. For the first time, writing was not limited to a scribal class serving a ruling or religious elite, whether in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Levant or in the syllabic Linear B world of the Mycenaean palatial system. As I have stated elsewhere:
Henceforth, a bard could reach across centuries to relate a real or imagined world of heroes [Homer], a woman could write poetry [Sappho], a farmer could write of works and days, even on the birth of gods [Hesiod], a playwright could construct figures of high tragedy or slapstick comedy [Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes], a seasoned traveler could recount his journeys and the customs of the peoples he chanced across [Herodotus], a failed and frustrated general could write a history of a war [Thucydides], and any male citizen could scratch on a potsherd the name of whomever he wished to ostracise (Papadopoulos 2014: 192).”
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... ore-reader
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