Horse Behavior

Discussions on behavioral ecology, evolutionary psychology, neurology, endocrinology, game theory, etc.

Horse Behavior

Postby vivian maxine on December 16th, 2016, 9:11 am 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... ce+News%29

Horses in trouble ask humans for help.

This is not news to anyone who has watch/listened to his cat sit in front of the fridge and yowl for dinner.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Horse Behavior

Postby Eclogite on December 16th, 2016, 12:56 pm 

As you say, not surprising. However, if research comes out suggesting arachnids have a similar appreciation of human society and individual character I shall join a monastery. Preferably a modern one without dark corners that can hide such arachnids.

I didn't mean to deviate your thread from horses and other domesticated animals, but someone has to take stand against those eight legged monsters.
Eclogite
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 1388
Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Location: Around and about


Re: Horse Behavior

Postby vivian maxine on December 16th, 2016, 1:02 pm 

Nah! Not deviated. Topic is testing animals to see if they have the same consciousness that we humans have. Arachnids? Credit them with one thing. I read once - ever so long ago - that spiders eat cockroaches. Now, anything that eats roaches gets my blessing. But I'm now thinking. Was it the other way around? Roaches eat spiders? I'd better check that out.

Very quiet around SciChat today?

P.S. I was right. Spiders feed on common indoor pests such as roaches, earwigs, mosquitoes, flies and clothes moths. Lots of other good (?) news about them here, too.

https://www.bayeradvanced.com/articles/ ... about-them

No matter. If you don't like them, send them away.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Horse Behavior

Postby Serpent on December 16th, 2016, 1:42 pm 

I like spiders well enough to rescue them from a bathtub, but don't expect them to be intelligent enough to ask for, or appreciate it.
Horses, I wouldn't choose for their conversation, either, but as domestic herbivores go, they're smart enough. Not nearly as clever as goats. Certainly, I would expect any domestic animal to look to to the two-legs for leadership, help and winter fodder.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2531
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Horse Behavior

Postby Eclogite on December 16th, 2016, 1:52 pm 

Serpent » Fri Dec 16, 2016 5:42 pm wrote:I like spiders well enough to rescue them from a bathtub, but don't expect them to be intelligent enough to ask for, or appreciate it.
I am meticulous enough in also rescuing them from bathtubs and removing them from the house. Before releasing them I give them a firm talk, but they never seem to pay attention.

As to cockroaches I have a general disagreement with all arthropods. The only invertebrate group with which I have good relations are the cephalopods. I have agreed not to eat them and they have agreed not to eat me. Thus far the arrangement is working out well.
Eclogite
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 1388
Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Location: Around and about


Re: Horse Behavior

Postby vivian maxine on December 16th, 2016, 2:03 pm 

I've asked many of them how they manage to get into the bathtub but it's their secreet. Do they actually swim up that long drain pipe? Can't do that? But, yes, put them outside. They hate that as it's winter time when they come in. Cruel out in that cold.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014



Return to Behavioral Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests