Point for the Perpetual Student

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Point for the Perpetual Student

Postby vivian maxine on May 4th, 2017, 8:50 am 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 131907.htm

To maintain cognitive health as you grow older, do not narrow down your field of learning - especially not to the field you work in. Keep to a broad field of learning experiences. The decline in broad learning has a causal role in cognitive aging.
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Re: Point for the Perpetual Student

Postby eagle on May 5th, 2017, 9:15 am 

Thank you for sharing this interesting article. While I agree that learning remains possible throughout life, as much recent research reports, and that many adults let their learning facilities mostly dry up, I also think it's important the point that the article somewhat touches on, that adults to some extent SHOULD limit their learning to function at work and elsewhere. In old age this becomes less of an issue, and indeed old age has been likened to infancy for a long time.

It's fun and arguably useful to incorporate childlike learning into creative work, like art and entrepreneurship.

I wonder which areas of the brain remain most or least pliable...
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Re: Point for the Perpetual Student

Postby vivian maxine on May 5th, 2017, 9:51 am 

"

I wonder which areas of the brain remain most or least pliable..."

Good question, eagle. I would ask which "become" less pliable naturally. In other words, of the things that seem to happen to our brains, which are (as of now, anyway) perfectly normal and which are problems that we can correct if we will.

Hmmm? Maybe I know the answer. I just remembered the story of a woman who went to her doctor with real worry. She told him she feared she was becoming senile. Why? She came home from a party late the night before and went right to bed to have a good night's sleep. Next morning she could not find her shoes. Looking everywhere and not finding them, she gave up and went to the fridge to fix breakfast. There she found her shoes. This did frighten her. No one puts shoes in the fridge - at least no sane person does.

"What did you do then?" asked her doctor. "I laughed hilariously. What more could I do?" "You're normal. No problem." and he sent her home much relieved.

Maybe what I want to remain most pliable is my sense of humor. :-)
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