Kerosene Lamp

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Kerosene Lamp

Postby Catapult on October 19th, 2011, 5:32 pm 

Hello,

I am planning to create my own "do-it-yourself" kerosene lamp which is similar to this photo:::http://theourworld.com/wp-content/uploads/DIYLightbulbRecyclingisCoolerThanYouThin_B353/DIY_Lightbulb_Recycling_5_theourworld_com.gif
Credit goes to whoever owned this photo.

But before I create one my own, I want to ask this question.

How do the wick lighten, or have a fire on it, if I place a fire on it?
Does the kerosene transfer from the wick?
If so, after it transfer what characteristics does a kerosene has that when a fire is place on it, it makes also a fire?

Thanks,,,, please help me.
Catapult
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Re: Kerosene Lamp

Postby CanadysPeak on October 19th, 2011, 7:19 pm 

Catapult wrote:Hello,

I am planning to create my own "do-it-yourself" kerosene lamp which is similar to this photo:::http://theourworld.com/wp-content/uploads/DIYLightbulbRecyclingisCoolerThanYouThin_B353/DIY_Lightbulb_Recycling_5_theourworld_com.gif
Credit goes to whoever owned this photo.

But before I create one my own, I want to ask this question.

How do the wick lighten, or have a fire on it, if I place a fire on it?
Does the kerosene transfer from the wick?
If so, after it transfer what characteristics does a kerosene has that when a fire is place on it, it makes also a fire?

Thanks,,,, please help me.


Kerosene burns by combining with oxygen in the air, but you must get the kerosene and oxygen mixed, i.e., with lots of surface area. There are two principal ways in which this is done: atomizing the kerosene by spraying it through something like a fuel injector; and, allowing a wick to carry up small amounts of the kerosene by wicking action, similar to capillary action (or perhaps the same if you use a broad definition). The wicking puts a small amount of fuel in contact with a lot of oxygen by spreading the fuel over a large area. You must ignite the fuel in either case; you can use a match or a spark gap.

Your homemade kerosene lamp is a major housefire waiting to happen. It's unsafe and it's likely your homeowners insurance would refuse to pay a claim if you had one of those. At the least, it has no wick control nor any chimney control - do you like breathing soot? Burning kerosene also stinks. I would never use a kerosene lamp inside; for outside, I'd buy one from Coleman or someone similar.
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