Is there a speed limit to the lighthouse paradox?

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Is there a speed limit to the lighthouse paradox?

Postby tj444 on December 24th, 2016, 4:17 am 

I will explain the lighthouse paradox assuming I understand it. Imagine a triangle. Now imagine I wave my hand at a angle from left to right to make a triangle. The beginning of the triangle is smaller at the start than at the v- shape at the end. Similar to the link. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... gram.png00 (Link referred to)

This will cause the light to go faster than the speed of light in a straight line because the light is not traveling across in a straight line. Like stated earlier it is traveling in a v-shape. This does not violate relativity because ftl travel has to go in a straight line.

Did I explain it well?
I highly recommend reading and watching the YouTube video for clarification.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lR4tJr7sMPM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lighthouse_paradox

My other question needs an explanation. I have 2 particles that are about to be quantum entangled.

The laser starts at one particle and destroys the other when it lands on it. The laser creates a v-shape and the particles are arranged in a straight line. This is similar to the lighthouse paradox. The particles could be on the moon and the laser could be in someone hand on earth.
Since the light from your hand is moving incredible fast could you do a test and see if the laser in your hand is faster than the the signal from the entangled particles on the moon? Just a reminder I am destroying one of the entangled particles.

Also is there a speed limit of the lighthouse paradox? What is the fastest and slowest the speed the lighthouse can occur at?

What is everyone thoughts on this post?



Did I explain that well? Feel free to ask for clarification on anything.

Also keep your responses simple because I am easily confused.
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Re: Is there a speed limit to the lighthouse paradox?

Postby Dave_Oblad on December 24th, 2016, 9:25 am 

You did fine tj444,

The water coming from your garden hose nozzle has a fixed speed (like light speed). So take the nozzle and scan it back and forth. Watch what the water does. Imagine a Bubble in that stream of water. Does the bubble ever go faster away from you because you are scanning the stream like a light house?.

If you do the same up towards the sky with a flashlight, you get the same effect. No part of that light beam (Photons=Bubbles) ever move faster than Light Speed.

If you stood at the North Pole and did your Light House trick while it rotates very fast, the light path viewed from far above would create a growing spiral. As that spiral grows, the "Spacing" between Photons (like bubbles) will grow. But no single Photon (bubble) ever goes faster than its max speed.

Here is a better analogy: Use a machine gun on a wall. Bullets from that gun have a specific speed. As you sweep across the wall, do you hit every spot (in a line) on that wall.. or do the impact spacing's just grow in distance from each other.. the faster you sweep your gun?

Did the bullets ever go faster than their normal speed because you did a sweep?

Now.. knowing this.. with your shooting those remote particle targets with photon bullets.. will you hit every one of the targets if you sweep too fast?

Note: The YouTube video is misleading and I had to drop a comment there. The Wiki link properly explains this but the language may be a bit beyond some people.

Hope that helps.

Regards,
Dave :^)
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Re: Is there a speed limit to the lighthouse paradox?

Postby tj444 on December 25th, 2016, 3:39 am 

I realize if you were on earth a spiral pattern would form on the moon.

In any situation would a straight line form? Could a straight line be used as an example?

Take a grid

https://www.google.ca/search?q=grid+x+a ... u2MuzJM%3A

Ignore the numbers on the grid. You mentioned that the photons doubles. Not sure if this correct.
The grid goes from 0,0 to 0,256. The photon hits at certain points. Dots on the graph. So the random numbers are (0,1) (0,2) (0,4) (0,8) (0, 16) (0,32) (0,64) (0,128) (0,256). Now imagine I fire two different lasers at the same time 0,0 and 0, 256. Would both lasers in both situations hit at the same time. And this is why the lighthouse paradox doesn't involve ftl?


Is this explanation wrong in anyway?
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Re: Is there a speed limit to the lighthouse paradox?

Postby Dave_Oblad on December 25th, 2016, 3:02 pm 

Hi tj444,

No.. the spiral pattern is in space radiated (sent) from a light house on the North Pole. From far above the North Pole.. the Light (if you could see it) would look like this pattern below:

Spiral.jpg
Spiral of Light or Water

Water will look the same way. Light is made of Photons and Water may have Bubbles.

The travel path of either is in straight line away from the center. I show the path of individuals dots as Red, Blue, and Green Photons or Bubbles. Neither the Photons nor the Bubbles are following the curved spiral path. The spiral pattern is only formed from adding in all the neighbor Photons or Bubbles. But each neighbor is still traveling in a straight line away from the center.

Or, imagine you at the center with a machine gun, shooting a series of bullets outwards as you spin. The individual bullets always go away from you in a straight line. The whole spray would look like this spiral pattern.

Per your question... it's not clear enough what you mean. Hit what.. each other?

I didn't say anything about individuals doubling. Look at how far apart the Red, Blue,and Green dots are apart when near the center. Then look at how far apart they are much later, when further away from the center. The spacing between individuals grows the further out you look. If there was a Planet in their path and the planet was far enough away, the whole planet could be missed in the growing space between the individual Photon bullets.

Or.. Imagine again you are spraying a spiral pattern of bullets while spinning like your lighthouse. If I was just two feet away from you, then it is likely that at least three bullets would hit me. If I was 1000 feet away, I stand a good chance of not getting hit at all. I would be in the widened gaps that had grown between your individual bullets.

In the pic below, I'm the Red dot (at two different test locations), the straight lines are your bullet paths, the circles are distance from you. You are located in the center spinning like a lighthouse shooting your machine gun bullets outwards:

Radial.jpg
Circles are Distance, straight Lines are Bullet paths

Notice when I was close to you, I got hit 3 times with your bullets. But at some distance, you completely missed me with your bullets.

Same with the Moon. If you sweep your laser beam across the Moon fast enough, it's possible no Photons from your Laser will even hit the Moon. And if any did.. it would only be a couple of places spaced widely apart. Get it? Your Laser spot is not moving across the moon super fast.. it is jumping across the Moon with gaps between hits. Just like bullets would do.

Hope this helps.. Have a great day,
Dave :^)
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