aging fast and slow

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aging fast and slow

Postby Athena on May 20th, 2017, 9:51 am 



You can pick your favorite oddity among these special children. What fascinates me most is the child aging very fast and an adult who is not aging but is mistaken for a young child. I had heard of the condition that causes a human to age very fast, but this is the first time of learning of one who stays young. What do you think?
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby BioWizard on May 20th, 2017, 10:17 am 

It's unclear to me whether the issue with the one that was claimed to age slower was truly due to slower ageing or simply faulty development of secondary sex characteristics (it was mentioned somewhere that he developed normally up until his teens). Without further data I'm unable to discern more about his condition, and I couldn't find much scientific literature on it (at least from my quick search while at the gym). It'd be interesting to know the median life span of people with this condition, and whether it is significantly longer than the population median. Though there may not be enough of a sample to do this, and their relative ageing rate may have to be determined using molecular markers of ageing.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby BioWizard on May 20th, 2017, 10:20 am 

SciameriKen any ideas?
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby Athena on May 20th, 2017, 11:15 am 

BioWizard » May 20th, 2017, 8:17 am wrote:It's unclear to me whether the issue with the one that was claimed to age slower was truly due to slower ageing or simply faulty development of secondary sex characteristics (it was mentioned somewhere that he developed normally up until his teens). Without further data I'm unable to discern more about his condition, and I couldn't find much scientific literature on it (at least from my quick search while at the gym). It'd be interesting to know the median life span of people with this condition, and whether it is significantly longer than the population median. Though there may not be enough of a sample to do this, and their relative ageing rate may have to be determined using molecular markers of ageing.


I think you have this right. I didn't think of that at first but I know a female who wasn't developing normally because in her teen years her hormones were not normal. She had medical treatments and began developing normally. Today she is pregnant and I hope that goes well.

I will see if I can find more information.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby Athena on May 20th, 2017, 11:21 am 

Sex hormones, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. ... A promising strategy to delay and perhaps prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD) is to identify the age-related changes that put the brain at risk for the disease. A significant normal age change known to result in tissue-specific dysfunction is the depletion of sex hormones.Jan 1, 2012
Sex hormones, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. - NCBI - NIH
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22201929


Does this mean I should intentionally increase stimulation of sex hormones? I have heard soy is like estrogen. I need to do more investigating.

This study indicates the older we are when we experience puberty, the longer we live.
From the abstract:
Aging, which maintains that hormones that promote growth and development early in life to achieve reproductive maturity act in an antagonistic pleitropic manner later, promoting senescence [13, 14]

This basically states that hormones that bring on puberty and growth also bring on aging. There are two recent studies quoted for this statement.

There was evidence found in the PELs of a cholesterol metabolism genotype/phenotype that delays development of the gonads (puberty). A genotype is two copies of the gene - one from each parent. Phenotype is the expression of the gene - and may only be one copy of a dominant gene. This would suggest that even one copy of the gene (phenotype) is favorable to advancing lifespan.

Other studies looked into the TOR signalling pathway. It's been shown that inhibiting of this pathway extends the lifespan of both invertebrates and mammals.
This pathway senses cell energy status, and stimulates cell growth and multiplication. Blocking mTOR delays puberty.

https://www.quora.com/Is-there-any-conn ... l-lifespan
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby Braininvat on May 20th, 2017, 12:03 pm 

Does this mean I should intentionally increase stimulation of sex hormones? I have heard soy is like estrogen. I need to do more investigating.
- Athena

I hope you will.

From what I've gleaned, it's important to understand that plant estrogens are different from mammalian estrogens and likely do not interact chemically with our cellular receptors. If there is new research that runs counter to this, I would interested to know about it.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby bangstrom on May 20th, 2017, 4:12 pm 

It is clear that individuals age differently and in many different ways so it is not surprising that there are a few individuals at all of the extremes of the bell curve. Centuries ago, humans bred wolves to remain puppies longer, more in behavior than in physical characteristics, but dogs are wolves that never quite grow up.

There is a thing called the Methuselah gene where humans tend to have greater levels of HDL than LDL, that is, they have more good cholesterol than bad. Such people may age normally in other ways but they live longer because they have fewer vascular problems. I once read a short story where a man in a nursing home made the dour observation that human evolution breeds more for longevity than it does for intelligence.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby BioWizard on May 20th, 2017, 4:37 pm 

bangstrom » 20 May 2017 03:12 pm wrote:made the dour observation that human evolution breeds more for longevity than it does for intelligence.


Except it doesn't.
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Re: To be or not to be...

Postby Faradave on May 21st, 2017, 1:04 pm 

...estrogenic.

Braininvat wrote:estrogens are different from mammalian estrogens ... If there is new research, ... I would interested to know about it.


"...phytoestrogenic plants. Also called "dietary estrogens", they are a diverse group of naturally occurring nonsteroidal plant compounds that, because of their structural similarity with estradiol (17-β-estradiol), have the ability to cause estrogenic or/and antiestrogenic effects, by sitting in and blocking receptor sites against estrogen."

Women have estrogen receptors in every tissue of their bodies. Phytoestrogens will bind to them and generally produce a weaker response then endogenous (a woman's own) estrogen. So, if the woman is premenopausal (i.e. making her own estrogen), phytoestrogens will tend to block her own with an overall weakening (antiestrogenic) effect. In a postmenopausal woman (i.e. no longer making her own estrogen), who is not taking prescribed replacement estrogens, phytoestrogens will generally provide an estrogenic effect.

In prolonged massive doses (think tons of tofu), phytoestrogens can be somewhat feminizing to males.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby Braininvat on May 21st, 2017, 2:49 pm 

Interesting, Dave. Where did you clip that from? I've heard the soy-tits scare, but hadn't seen any solid studies on it. (Is it difficult, I wonder, to find men who will eat tons of tofu?) (J K)
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Re: Coloring inside the lines

Postby Faradave on May 21st, 2017, 8:32 pm 

Braininvat wrote:Where did you clip that from?

Sorry BiV, if I didn't play around with fonts so much it would have been obvious.
See above "...phytoestrogenic

I was probably overstating things in reference to tofu. You're quite correct that normal humans can't stomach enough to cause pronounced effects. There are however concentrated phytoestrogens available in health food stores (think red clover, but it could be done with soy), often sold as hot flash remedies. Do-it-yourself transgender seeking males can take overdoses of these to feminize, though it is far easier and more effective to acquire actual estrogens through a cooperative prescriber or female patient.

As I recall, there are two known functions the plant has for phytoestrogens,
1) They act as a chemoattractant for nitrogen fixing bacteria to the roots of legumes such as soy.
2) They act like a birth control pill to suppress ovulation in insects, which ingest the plant as a dietary mainstay.
Last edited by Faradave on May 21st, 2017, 8:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby SciameriKen on May 21st, 2017, 8:37 pm 

BioWizard » Sat May 20, 2017 2:17 pm wrote:It's unclear to me whether the issue with the one that was claimed to age slower was truly due to slower ageing or simply faulty development of secondary sex characteristics (it was mentioned somewhere that he developed normally up until his teens). Without further data I'm unable to discern more about his condition, and I couldn't find much scientific literature on it (at least from my quick search while at the gym). It'd be interesting to know the median life span of people with this condition, and whether it is significantly longer than the population median. Though there may not be enough of a sample to do this, and their relative ageing rate may have to be determined using molecular markers of ageing.



I think this is pretty solid speculation - to my knowledge there is nothing in the literature regarding conditions the decelerate aging. However, these stories are starting to emerge - in addition to Athena's Link here is another link that covers a few other such stories (http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life- ... ld-4704634). Intellectual growth seems to be hindered as well though - with the exception of the guy from Korea. I'm hoping some researchers are looking to sequence these folks and start exploring what is going on here. That being said - Bio is right, what we might be seeing here is merely slow aging of appearance, but organs and other tissues may still be aging at a typical rate.
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Re: aging fast and slow

Postby SciameriKen on May 21st, 2017, 8:41 pm 

Braininvat » Sat May 20, 2017 4:03 pm wrote:
Does this mean I should intentionally increase stimulation of sex hormones? I have heard soy is like estrogen. I need to do more investigating.
- Athena

I hope you will.

From what I've gleaned, it's important to understand that plant estrogens are different from mammalian estrogens and likely do not interact chemically with our cellular receptors. If there is new research that runs counter to this, I would interested to know about it.



My understanding is that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not really as amazing as one would think it would be. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on testosterone replacement studies, and most have shone little to no benefit. Estrogen replacement meanwhile is somewhat hit or miss - This review seems to have more information on it - but it appears some will benefit, others won't, and others could see detriment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28281363
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Re: Window of opportunity

Postby Faradave on May 21st, 2017, 9:09 pm 

The greatest evidence of benefit for postmenopausal estrogen replacement is when they are initiated at the first signs of menopause (which isn't always obvious). There is a great deal of anxiety about breast cancer risk relating to poor communication of the data. Personally, I put a lot of the blame on the FDA.

For example, the WARNING, relating to breast cancer in FDA mandated product labeling for estrogen replacement indicates a relative risk of 0.8. Unfortunately, most women (and a fair amount of prescribers) stop at the word "WARNING" but I remind you that a relative risk less than 1.0 is lower than that for women not receiving estrogen replacement!

"The most important randomized clinical trial providing information about breast cancer in estrogen-alone users is the WHI substudy of daily CE (0.625 mg) -alone. In the WHI estrogen-alone substudy, after an average follow-up of 7.1 years, daily CE-alone was not associated with an increased risk of invasive breast cancer [relative risk (RR) 0.80]"

That data has no business being in a WARNING section. It's caused untold anxiety and needless flushing of medication.
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