Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

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Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

Postby wolfhnd on October 2nd, 2009, 9:54 pm 

ScienceDaily (Oct. 2, 2009) — Tiny organisms that covered the planet more than 250 million years ago appear to be a species of ancient fungus that thrived in dead wood, according to new research published October 1 in the journal Geology.

The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London and other universities in the UK, USA and The Netherlands, believe that the organisms were able to thrive during this period because the world's forests had been wiped out. This would explain how the organisms, which are known as Reduviasporonites, were able to proliferate across the planet.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 181051.htm
Attachments
091001181051.jpg
An enlarged image of Reduviasporonites. Scientists believe extinct fungus species capitalised on a world-wide disaster and thrived on early Earth. (Credit: Image courtesy of Imperial College London)
wolfhnd
 


Re: Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

Postby DrCloud on October 3rd, 2009, 7:37 am 

Oh, man! If it's not earthquakes and volcanoes or global warming or a global influenza pandemic, it's fungus that's gonna get us. We're all doomed! Doomed, I say!
HPH
DrCloud
 


Re: Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

Postby wolfhnd on October 3rd, 2009, 10:59 pm 

It seems that it is after we are gone that the Fungus will have their feast.
wolfhnd
 


Re: Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

Postby Lincoln on October 6th, 2009, 5:37 pm 

Only if you're made of wood.
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Re: Ancient Fungus-Global Catastrophe

Postby wolfhnd on October 6th, 2009, 9:19 pm 

The news staff does not endorse nor validate the content of the news. Readers are advised to draw their own conclusions.

So much data and so little time.
wolfhnd
 



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