Hottest day in human recorded history

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Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on March 6th, 2016, 11:50 pm 

The mercury doesn’t lie: We’ve hit a troubling climate change milestone
https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2016/03/04/why-degree-temperature-jump-more-important-than-trump-hands/lCyz5MHZkH8aD0HIDJrcYJ/story.html

Thursday, while the nation debated the relative size of Republican genitalia, something truly awful happened. Across the northern hemisphere, the temperature, if only for a few hours, apparently crossed a line: it was more than two degrees Celsius above “normal” for the first time in recorded history and likely for the first time in the course of human civilization.


Didn't something similar happen as the Maya and Inca empires collapsed? I am referring to weird human behavior such as the circus our political system is headed in. Our societies are not a joke. Our leaders are a joke.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on March 7th, 2016, 1:52 am 

Our societies are in irreversible decline. Our planet is terminally ill.

The depth to which Republican discourse has sunk is a result of deliberate machinations by sane, intelligent humans. The edge on which all life is poised is a result of deliberate economic and industrial activity by sane, intelligent humans.

Donald The Last may well be a fitting poster-boy for both outcomes. I'm sure the Inheritors will appreciate the humour.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on March 23rd, 2016, 9:34 pm 

More from  Bill McKibben

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Chemistry
http://www.thenation.com/article/global-warming-terrifying-new-chemistry/

If you get the chemistry wrong, it doesn’t matter how many landmark climate agreements you sign or how many speeches you give. And it appears the United States may have gotten the chemistry wrong. Really wrong.


I think this is pretty scary @$%^ for what my future holds.

We’ve reached the point where Denmark can generate 42 percent of its power from the wind, and where Bangladesh is planning to solarize every village in the country within the next five years. We’ve reached the point, that is, where the idea of natural gas as a “bridge fuel” to a renewable future is a marketing slogan, not a realistic claim (even if that’s precisely the phrase that Hillary Clinton used to defend fracking in a debate earlier this month).
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on April 22nd, 2016, 12:59 pm 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/opini ... asant.html


Interesting look at the way Americans shrug their shoulders at global warming. Living in South Dakota, I understand the attitude this talks about. Here on the western edge of the state, the semiarid climate means air that is sufficiently dry that summer never really feels unpleasant and it always cools off at night here in the Hills. Combine that with the warmer winters, and you may start to wonder if there's going to be a population boom out here when places like Omaha and Kansas City become uninhabitable in the summer. Should Canada worry?
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on April 22nd, 2016, 4:18 pm 

Should Canada worry?
Big Time!
The Arctic, nearly half of our land-mass, is likely to be under water within thirty years - with the feedback, probably sooner. All the indigenous peoples up there have to relocate - except there is nowhere for them to go. The productive part of the east coast will be submerged, but Newfoundland (the rock) will remain stable. Too bad it has an average topsoil depth of 3", most of which will be blown off by hurricane activity. In the western mountains, vast tracts of beetle-killed pine will go up in flames. The lower, habitable, edges of the west coast being washed away by rising ocean and tsunami, all the people will fight their up those denuded slopes and find no sustenance.

The prairies will alternate between scorching drought and unstoppable flood (Of course, only by the rivers, which is where they built cities.) The soil will drift as it did during the Dust Bowl years, because nobody's been able to figure out, meanwhile, that mega-farms are convenient only for heavy machinery. The oil sands will suck, sink and stink. The rivers that are already contaminated will be substantially diminished in flow, once the glaciers are gone, so the more concentrated toxins will affect a more concentrated population fighting over less water. Dead cattle will be rotting on the burned grass, because the scavenger bird and rodent population will have succumbed to pesticide and habitat loss and the last of the predatory mammals.
This is the scene into which migrant middle-American populations, pushed from behind by Mexican and South American refugees, will blunder. They will have many guns and babies but no provisions and very short tempers and zero tolerance of one another.
No, you cannot grow cantaloupe without soil or water, no matter how hot it gets. And, of course, there is no telling what the next winter dumps on whom.
http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/photos/man%e2%80%99s-impact-on-our-planet/ss-BBs84Si?ocid=spartanntp
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on April 22nd, 2016, 7:47 pm 

Right below the article/photos you linked was an ad for luxury SUVs. Heh.

I spent Earth Day, as I spend many days now, restoring an old house that would otherwise get the wrecking ball and then require chopping down a bunch of trees to replace it. Am currently trying to stop the city from demolishing another old wreck, which i believe has good structural timber and is worth salvaging.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on April 22nd, 2016, 8:08 pm 

Good old [blatantlyliberal-biassed] MSN! I never check the ads. I try to ignore the ones on here, as well.

Ah, I get some heavy nostalgia for the my old house renovating days! Not that this one is really finished, but I don't suppose it ever will be: we're running out of steam.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby uninfinite on April 29th, 2016, 7:48 am 

If I may be forgiven for interjecting some positivity into this debate, 2015 spending on renewable energy reached a record high of approximately $285bn - up from the previous record of $215bn in 2011.

This is a link to 'global trends in renewable energy investment' website:

http://fs-unep-centre.org/publications/ ... tment-2015
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on April 29th, 2016, 8:59 am 

Yes, that's a good thing - although I'm always leery of anything valued in $$ figures: it tells me somebody's getting paid, but doesn't tell me what they're producing or who ultimately benefits.

I was following the TVO coverage of a conference on energy held at the Perimeter Institute. Lots of clever people. But they're still saying what was obvious in 1990. Politically, many nations have barely budged in a quarter century - a quarter century of really obviously volatile weather. In Canada, we have, at last, a federal government committed to serious action on climate change, and at least two provinces have just elected governments committed to blocking his efforts.

As for the denial camp, they've been bad-mouthing scientist for years, jeering, mocking and hollering "Fraud!". Now, they're starting to print articles in the tone of, "Maybe climate change is real, but it's too late to stop, so we may as well eat moose, drink oil and be rich."

Bah!
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on June 1st, 2016, 5:00 pm 

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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on June 1st, 2016, 8:19 pm 

I suspect this will be a growing theme that could turn into a larger thread but let's see how it goes.

I made a prediction to a whole group of people last month that sometime this summer Germany is going to hit 100% solar powered again like last summer and that will be a growing theme as well.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby doogles on June 2nd, 2016, 4:57 am 

I’m not a climate sceptic; I’m convinced from my own independent reading that our average annual near-surface global temperatures are steadily rising at a far slower rate that those originally predicted by the doomsday prophets. But I am quite sceptical about the emphasis being placed on the role of atmospheric carbon dioxide as a major cause.

That’s been covered in another thread on Climate Change.

I believe that one of the reasons we have ‘climate sceptics’ is that many people are just naturally resistant to ‘alarmist reports’ such as the recent ones in this post.

Just to get a balance on these recent ‘record’ temperatures here’s something to think about from almost 200 years ago. These are entries from Captain Charles Sturt’s early exploration of western New South Wales in the 1820s – on this site - http://joannenova.com.au/2012/07/charle ... more-22045 . As the author said, Not 2010, BUT 1828 at a blistering 53.9 °C.” In these diary entries, you will see that Sturt spoke about the thermometers actually bursting with the heat.

If you take the effort to read towards the bottom of this diary of Charles Sturt, you will see the following - “It may give His Excellency some idea of the heat to which we were exposed, when I assure you that I found the thermometer which I had lefl with Joseph, and which was fixed in the shade of a large tree, four feet from the ground, stationary 135 ° of Fahrenheit at half-past two p.m., and that in the direct rays of the sun it rose to 157 °. It had, on a former occasion, when Mr, Browne was with me, Stood at 132 ° in the shade, and 153 ° in the sun.” (The Courier (Hobart, Tas.) Saturday 11 October 1845)

That is 57.2°C, four feet from the ground and in the shade!

If you have doubts, the same as myself, about the accuracy of the thermometers in those days, the only evidence I have about their accuracy is the following two reports – Firstly, this anecdote - “The heat was greater than that of the previous summer; the thermometer ranging between 110 degrees and 123 degrees every day; the wind blowing heavily from N.E. to E.S.E. filled the air with impalpable red dust, giving the sun the most foreboding and lurid appearance as we looked upon him. The ground was so heated that our matches falling on it, ignited; and, having occasion to make a night signal, I found the whole of our rockets had been rendered useless, as on being lit they exploded at once without rising from the ground.”

Secondly – “The thermometer ranges during the summer months, that is, from September to March, from 36 degrees to 106 degrees of Fahrenheit, but the mean of the temperature during the above period is 70 degrees.” In degrees C that range equates to a minimum of 2.2 , a max of 41.1 with a mean of 21.1. This average seems close to the current average but the lower and upper temperatures were both more extreme than they are now!
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on June 2nd, 2016, 1:20 pm 

Doogles, You are talking about a couple single recorded observations many years ago compared to a large number of measurements taken and averaged over a region (the earth) by thousands of people. Not to mention back in those times people claimed of lands with giants and there are still people going around the internet that held onto those beliefs claiming to have fossils of giant humans.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on June 2nd, 2016, 4:09 pm 

I'm assuming those temperatures were recorded by an explorer in the Australian desert. I believe that happened, and in more than one summer. Now it's happening every year, in more places - some of them places that are supped to be, or recently were, arable lands. And all of the deserts have grown considerably in 150 years.
I don't think it's inappropriate to be alarmed by this trend.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby doogles on June 3rd, 2016, 4:18 am 

Zetrique and Serpent, I thought that people with open scientific minds may have been a little intrigued that an explorer in the 1820s recorded the ‘hottest days in human recorded history’. I’m left wondering about the amount of such information worldwide that lies in archives around the world, waiting to be re-discovered. There weren’t thousands of people employed in the ‘global warming’ industry back in those days pushing their own belief systems. But you are probably correct, Serpent, when you imply that the record high temperatures in various localities are becoming more frequent.

This site, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_weather_records , lists the 'hottest recorded days on record'; most have occurred in the 21st century; but there is no record of how far back the records go for each listing. If you look at it this site, you will appreciate that Sturt’s figures for readings, four feet above the ground and in the shade, beat all of the listed temperatures. Note that I’ve already addressed the plausibility of his readings.

Maybe I’m a bit touchy when I see publicity for extremes being presented to support a belief system when I would far prefer to see the balanced type of prediction that the IPCC is now presenting. If you look at this site - http://www.nationalreview.com/article/4 ... n-liberals , you will see where journalist David French has recalled some of the early alarmist claims eg
“Al Gore predicted “unless the world took “drastic measures” to reduce greenhouse gases, it would reach a “point of no return” in ten years”
• “Good Morning America claimed that in 2015 milk would cost almost $13 a gallon, gas would be more than $9 a gallon, “flames [would] cover hundreds of square miles,” one billion people would be malnourished, and Manhattan would be flooding — all because of climate change”
• “In 2007, the chairman of the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Rajenda Pachauri, said, “If there’s no action before 2012, that’s too late. . . . What we do in the next two to three years will determine our future. This is the defining moment.”

The title of this thread is “The hottest day in human recorded history”. If you just publicise these events (and not the overall perspective) after events such as the above three examples, to my mind it adds to the ‘alarmism’ perspective.

As a matter of interest, here’s another extreme that has NOT been in the news lately. 437 people died in the eastern States –
1. By Tuesday Jan 14, people were reported falling dead in the streets.
2. Unable to sleep, people in Brewarrina walked the streets at night for hours, thermometers recorded 109F at midnight.
3. Overnight, the temperature did not fall below 103°F.
4. On Jan 18 in Wilcannia, five deaths were recorded in one day, the hospitals were overcrowded and reports said that “more deaths are hourly expected”.
5. By January 24, in Bourke, many businesses had shut down (almost everything bar the hotels).
6. Panic stricken Australians were fleeing to the hills in climate refugee trains.

This happened in 1896.

Maybe such events were as common 150 to 200 years ago but just weren’t recorded. How many towns in the world had thermometers or weather bureaus?

Please regard the above as just ‘food for thought’. Please accept that I am NOT a climate-change denier. I’ll state again that I accept the latest modified IPCC predictions of projected increases in average global near-surface temperatures. I have severe doubts about carbon dioxide control being the answer to the problem - but that's an issue in another thread (Please do not comment on that here).
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on June 3rd, 2016, 11:23 am 

Grand Canyon NPS ‏@GrandCanyonNPS 7m7 minutes ago Flagstaff, AZ

Hiking in #GrandCanyon this weekend NOT advised - EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING. Phantom Ranch could reach 113 F/ 45 C -mq
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on June 3rd, 2016, 12:00 pm 

Yes, I do take your meaning, Doogles. I was in Death Valley, last century, and it was pretty damn hot. I'm also aware that there have been ice ages, vulcanic eruptions and other cataclysmic events in the past, killing hundreds of thousands of people. Isolated incidence of extreme heat (or, not mentioned here, extreme cold) in some particular place at some particular time, even if it occurred far more times than were recorded over 20 centuries, doesn't balance a steadily-rising global trend over 20 consecutive years.

• “Good Morning America claimed that in 2015 milk would cost almost $13 a gallon, gas would be more than $9 a gallon, “flames [would] cover hundreds of square miles,” one billion people would be malnourished, and Manhattan would be flooding — all because of climate change”

Good Morning America may not be the highest authority, and predictions may well be off by a decade or affect a different continent first. Somalia and Venice submerge before Manhattan... That doesn't make it untrue. We do have plenty of malnutrition - not to mention deaths by starvation and the less well documented deaths from related illness. http://www.worldwatch.org/node/554 The $ cost of things in the US is hardly a valid indicator of how well the world's population is eating. Lots of Americans can't afford food, energy and transport; plenty of homes have already been flooded out, blown away, burned down. Thousands of hectares of are burning right now - as they do every summer. http://www.earth-policy.org/images/uploads/graphs_tables/fire.htm

That those previous events were survived by the majority of humans did not console the casualties and is no help at all to the very many more people who won't survive the next one. That the Earth recovered from previous events is no predictor that it will recover again. It's been deforested and polluted quite a lot since the last big die-off. It's in the same condition as I am. When I had a bout of pneumonia at 22, I was back on my feet in less than a week. At 70, after cancer treatments and surgery, I could easily die of the same pneumonia. Or survive in a far more depleted condition.

• “In 2007, the chairman of the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Rajenda Pachauri, said, “If there’s no action before 2012, that’s too late. . . . What we do in the next two to three years will determine our future. This is the defining moment.”

Unfortunately, that's true. All we can do now is mitigate the damage.... and we won't.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on June 5th, 2016, 9:16 pm 

Image
not sure how far back the records go.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on June 6th, 2016, 10:11 am 

Hard to believe 88 is a record high for June 5, in Flagstaff, AZ. That's not even a record, for that date, in the Black Hills of South Dakota.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on June 6th, 2016, 10:58 am 

What part of the Black hills? Probably cooler near the top. Flagstaff is at about 7,000' above sea level.
It's really nice there!
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on June 6th, 2016, 11:38 am 

Ahh, you're right, I had forgotten that Flagstaff is so altitudinous. At that elevation, it would be quite a bit cooler than I was thinking. We're down in the foothills, by Rapid City, around 3400 ft. Up around the neutrino collector, in Lead, it's quite a bit cooler at 5200 ft. Deadwood Gulch is even chillier, because the valley is so narrow there's no direct sun in some places before 9:30AM or after 5PM.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on June 6th, 2016, 12:30 pm 

I wouldn't mind seeing that gulch. I guess my cross-country, and especially cross-border, travels are over, so I'll have to find a nice virtual visit on Discovery Channel or something.

The drive up to Flagstaff was amazing. It winds up and up under these great big pine trees, smelling fresher and greener every mile. After crossing New Mexico, it's like your soul is being watered. I can see why people might like to live there and build and observatory.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on June 27th, 2016, 3:03 am 

Alaska Is Having Hottest Year Since Records Began
http://ecowatch.com/2016/06/10/alaska-hottest-year/
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/alaska-continues-to-bake-on-track-for-hottest-year-20422

wow
Between March and May of this year, the meteorological spring, the entire state has been about 10 degrees hotter than normal, with an average temperature of 32 F.


I was in Alaska 2 years ago for the first time. I packed cold weather clothes and it was hot as hell there. I stupidly didn't have any warm weather clothes and sweat my ass off while I got attacked by one of the worst mosquito situations I could imagine due in part by the unusually high amounts of rain they got before I arrived.

“Alaska isn’t only experiencing the hottest temperatures on record by a huge margin,”observed Gizmodo: “The state’s frozen rivers broke up earlier than ever before. The growing season shifted earlier than ever in recorded history. The state is also drying up quick, with only the very lowest coastal regions not in active drought right now.”

The effects of the elevated temperatures are readily apparent, Thoman said, with berries ripening weeks earlier than usual, very early “last frosts” and an early start to construction projects.


Many locations in Alaska observed their warmest May on record, some on the heels of their warmest April. Among these locations were Kotzebue, on the northwest coast, which recorded an average 40.6 F (4.8 C), 8.7 F (4.8 C) above normal, and King Salmon, in the southwest, which averaged 49.0 F (9.4 C), 4.8 F (2.7 C) above normal. Records for Kotzebue began in 1897 and King Salmon in 1917.


In other news. It looks like a new blair witch project movie is coming out.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbC82_5YZtA
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on July 7th, 2016, 7:42 pm 

http://www.noaa.gov/june-was-record-warm-contiguous-us

The average June temperature for the Lower 48 states was 71.8 degrees F, making it the warmest June on record, according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on July 7th, 2016, 8:19 pm 

A little confusing wording by Ken Dewey http://snr.unl.edu/lincolnweather/

but it's the record lowest June High temperatures I think. All highs were 80 or higher.

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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Serpent on July 7th, 2016, 9:57 pm 

So, more people will run their stupid air-conditioners longer, and buy more ice and filter their stupid chlorinated swimming pools and barbeque more meat that has to be transported millions of miles in refrigerated trucks, from one refrigerated warehouse to another....

Dot-connecting is a lost art.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on November 18th, 2016, 9:55 pm 

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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on November 18th, 2016, 10:11 pm 

Can believe it. Yesterday was the first day this Fall that we had typical Dakota weather. Highs have been consistently 10-20 degrees F. above normal the past six weeks. Last month I climbed Black Elk Peak, which is usually a pretty chilly place by mid October. I brought a coat and warm pants, but ended up climbing in a teeshirt and several people were in shorts. Down here, we had wasps buzzing around the yard until a few days ago, which I've never seen before.
Guess those Northwest Passage buffs will be happy.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on November 18th, 2016, 10:14 pm 

At this rate of change we are going to see a lot of species go extinct. I'm thinking these recent temperature high extremes might have something to do with the sudden increase in fracking/methane leaks.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby doogles on November 19th, 2016, 5:46 pm 



I like to keep a balance of some kind in these alarmist reports.
1922 ARCTIC WARMING.jpg


The above is a screen dump of a page from the 'Monthly Weather Review' in 1922 - in the days, once again before we had a Global Warming industry and thermometers all over the planet.
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