Hottest day in human recorded history

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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Braininvat on December 3rd, 2016, 1:03 pm 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/02/science/global-warming-daily-mail-breitbart.html

About misreporting of climate findings by partisan news sources.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Athena on December 27th, 2016, 12:22 am 

Braininvat » April 22nd, 2016, 5:47 pm wrote:Right below the article/photos you linked was an ad for luxury SUVs. Heh.

I spent Earth Day, as I spend many days now, restoring an old house that would otherwise get the wrecking ball and then require chopping down a bunch of trees to replace it. Am currently trying to stop the city from demolishing another old wreck, which i believe has good structural timber and is worth salvaging.


Thank you. I love old buildings and homes and I wish we did a better job of restoring them.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby Athena on December 27th, 2016, 12:27 am 

uninfinite » April 29th, 2016, 5:48 am wrote:If I may be forgiven for interjecting some positivity into this debate, 2015 spending on renewable energy reached a record high of approximately $285bn - up from the previous record of $215bn in 2011.

This is a link to 'global trends in renewable energy investment' website:

http://fs-unep-centre.org/publications/ ... tment-2015


President Carter had us conserving and developing alternative energy. Reagan said that was not necessary and dismantled what Carter set up. We could be much further ahead if we had stayed on the path Carter put us on.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on December 30th, 2016, 1:29 am 

Effectively communicating climate change is a challenge. The animated climate spiral is a different way to show the historically observed changes and resonates with a broad audience. The original version quickly went viral, being seen millions of times on facebook and twitter. A version was even used in the opening ceremony of the Rio Olympics!

This page will provide regularly updated versions of the climate spiral for several different aspects of the climate. The graphics are free to use with appropriate credit – just click the links for the full versions to download


http://www.climate-lab-book.ac.uk/spirals/
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on August 29th, 2017, 7:00 pm 

Hottest month in recorded history.

http://grist.org/article/death-valley-had-the-hottest-month-ever-measured-on-earth/

The National Weather Service says it’s too early to link up the temperatures to climate change. “It’s on everyone’s mind,” said Wines. But Burt stresses that even though he doesn’t like to weigh in on climate change, the trend of hotter temperatures in Death Valley surely can be attributed to climate change because of the dearth of other factors, such as an urban heat effect. The role that hotter nights played in the record also is consistent with projected climate change impacts. “That’s a trend we’ve been seeing,” Burt said.


Bakersfield, California; Reno, Nevada; and Salt Lake City, Utah, also had the hottest July, and overall hottest month in their recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


Can't tell me it's not climate change. I've seen the long term data first hand.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby doogles on August 29th, 2017, 11:08 pm 

I'm not trying for one-upmanship Zetrique, but I think Chris Burt may not have checked too far when researching checking his Death Valley figures - "Weather historian Christopher Burt had been closely tracking the blazing temperatures in Death Valley, California, this summer. The days were hot, but what was especially notable to him was that the desert nights failed to cool off much. As the official data closed at midnight on July 31, he did the math. “Oh my God, the average was 107.4,” said Burt. “I knew right away that was the hottest month in Death Valley and therefore the hottest month in the United States and Western Hemisphere.”

After a bit of checking, he determined that an even more auspicious record had been reached. “Without question, the hottest reliably measured average monthly temperature on earth was in Death Valley in July,” said Burt, who wrote a blog post about it for Weather Underground."


I had a look at the recent figures for Marble Bar in Western Australia. This Table shows the monthly means of the daily maximum temperatures since 2000. 107.4 F is 41.9 C. As you can see, many monthly averages exceeded the Death Valley figures.


MARBLE BAR HOTTER MONTHS.jpg



The hottest monthly mean of daily maxima of 44.9C is equal to 112.8 F.

Of interest, Marble Bar still seems to hold the world record for the number of consecutive days when the maximum temperature exceeded 100 F - See
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/08/21/ ... e-1923-24/

"From Wikipedia: The record for the longest heat wave in the world is generally accepted to have been set in Marble Bar in Australia, where from October 31, 1923 to April 7, 1924 the temperature broke the 37.8 °C (100.0 °F) benchmark, setting the heat wave record at 160 days. .... CO2 was 305 ppm at the time. ....
and at Nyang, the average maximum over the entire summer exceeded 43°C. As in 1923-24, very dry conditions accompanied the extreme heat.
" 43 C is 109.4 F.

Unfortunately I was unable to bring up all the really old figures from Marble Bar. I would love to have been able to check them.
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby zetreque on August 29th, 2017, 11:53 pm 

Interesting. You are in a different region of the world. The climate on and island continent could behave very differently.

Here is some data for you.

http://terc.ucdavis.edu/stateofthelake/ ... rology.pdf

Average water temperature is very concerning in such a large volume of fresh water.
http://terc.ucdavis.edu/stateofthelake/ ... ysical.pdf
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Re: Hottest day in human recorded history

Postby doogles on August 30th, 2017, 5:32 am 

Since my last post, I managed to locate our Bureau of Meteorology's figures on monthly mean maximum temperatures during the 160-odd consecutive days of temperatures above 100 F in 1923/24 at Marble Bar.

MARBLE BAR 1020S.jpg


Just as a matter of interest I compared the average monthly maxima over this period with the final ten recent years shown in my previous post. The mean of all 120 pieces of monthly maxima data from 1916 to 1925 was 35.67 C and from 2006 to 2016 (I deleted one year because of missing data which counts as zero in Excel's statistics) was 35.69 C. A 2-tailed t-test using Excel's statistics software produced a P value for the 120 paired data of 0.97. This was as non-significant as one can get statistically.

In common terminology, this means that for a ten-year period at Marble Bar in Western Australia 90 years ago, there was no significant difference from the temperatures they experienced then compared with those of the recent ten years in the 21st century in the same area. I've supplied all of the official figures for anyone to check.

In addition you'll note that there were also many months during that decade 90 years ago when the mean monthly maximum temperature exceeded the Death Valley July high of 41.9 C (107.4 F).

Also note again that the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration back in the 1920s would have been about 300 ppm volume dry air.

Having produced this checkable data about Marble Bar(which at face value appears to deny Climate Change), I have to say that my personal position after appraising data far more widely than that provided here, is that I believe there is an overall small increase in average global near-surface temperatures of the order now recognised by the IPCC.
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