Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Anyone can post and discuss breaking science news or science-related public policy, that interests them (please respect posting guidelines and be sure to reference properly).
Forum rules
Please be sure to check our forum's Rules & Guidelines

Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby zetreque on June 23rd, 2016, 9:20 pm 

How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/20/microfibers-plastic-pollution-oceans-patagonia-synthetic-clothes-microbeads

New studies indicate that the fibers in our clothes could be poisoning our waterways and food chain on a massive scale. Microfibers – tiny threads shed from fabric – have been found in abundance on shorelines where waste water is released.


The solutions section is interesting.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3781
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby TheVat on June 23rd, 2016, 10:38 pm 

As soon as I remedy one eco-harming habit (I switched to microbeadless toothpaste, the kind with baking soda), another one rears its ugly head!
User avatar
TheVat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 7182
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby vivian maxine on June 24th, 2016, 9:30 am 

So true, Biv. As in what foods are good for us, what medicines are good for us, what life styles are good for us. Sunshine used to be good for us. We put the baby outside in his buggy to get his daily dose of good sunshine. Now we slather ourselves with protection that muddies the waters we drink. We avoid the sun and now everybody is being told he/she is low on vitamin D. There is no winning. Just do your own thing and enjoy life. Only, even that isn't recommended as wise. :-(
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2823
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby Watson on June 24th, 2016, 9:52 am 

It seems to me that my lint trap is very full after each load. I often think of putting it out for the birds to nest with. Bad idea. And I wonder how many lint loads to make a shirt?

I know it is not the same as micro beads/fiber, but for perspective, there is a lot of this crap going into the environment. We just need the appropriate filter.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4609
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby vivian maxine on June 24th, 2016, 9:58 am 

Watson » June 24th, 2016, 8:52 am wrote:It seems to me that my lint trap is very full after each load. I often think of putting it out for the birds to nest with. Bad idea. And I wonder how many lint loads to make a shirt?

I know it is not the same as micro beads/fiber, but for perspective, there is a lot of this crap going into the environment. We just need the appropriate filter.


And what do you do with it after you filter it? An idea? What if we dumped our trash in active volcanoes? Not enough of them?
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2823
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby Watson on June 24th, 2016, 10:32 am 

No, the volcanic discharge is already toxic over the local areas. I can only imagine the micro ash would be even worse in the cooked form. We will likely just bury it, as with other problems we have no other way to deal with.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4609
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby vivian maxine on June 24th, 2016, 10:41 am 

Watson » June 24th, 2016, 9:32 am wrote:No, the volcanic discharge is already toxic over the local areas. I can only imagine the micro ash would be even worse in the cooked form. We will likely just bury it, as with other problems we have no other way to deal with.


Well, maybe burying it is safer than what is happening due to the buried fracking water. Have you seen the July issue of Scientific American? That was not a good article to close my sleepy eyes on last night. Don't fool around with Mother Nature.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2823
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby TheVat on June 24th, 2016, 12:10 pm 

The waterless washing machine seems promising - living in a semiarid region, I can see more than one plus for that tech. Saving water, keeping microfibers out of wastewater, and also more flexible as to which room you put washer in...no plumbing needed in laundry area? Of course, how you cleaned the filter would matter, too.
User avatar
TheVat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 7182
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby zetreque on June 24th, 2016, 12:53 pm 

The foundation’s director, Maria Westerbos, said a nanoball that could be thrown into a washing machine to attract and capture plastic fibers also seems promising.


Green technology creating jobs. To solve a problem, you have to come up with another product. Will that product end up being bad for the environment though? I'd like to think it's a closer step to sustainability though.

vivian maxine » Fri Jun 24, 2016 6:58 am wrote:
And what do you do with it after you filter it? An idea? What if we dumped our trash in active volcanoes? Not enough of them?


Would be great if we could turn it back into plastic bottles or clothes?
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3781
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: Are your clothes poisoning waterways?

Postby vivian maxine on June 24th, 2016, 1:25 pm 

vian maxine » Fri Jun 24, 2016 6:58 am wrote:

And what do you do with it after you filter it? An idea? What if we dumped our trash in active volcanoes? Not enough of them?



zetrec wrote:Would be great if we could turn it back into plastic bottles or clothes?


Would be great - yes. You remind me that, some years ago, they were talking about disposable clothes. We'd wear them once or twice and toss them into the trash. Now that would save water!
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2823
Joined: 01 Aug 2014



Return to Science News Discussion Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: JamesBem, MMAcoulge and 14 guests