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Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: August 28th, 2017, 3:28 pm
by Athena
In Oregon and Washington we are dealing with forest fires and because of high air pressure coming up from Arizona, the smoke is being pushed into the valley.

Right now our quality of air quality is very bad and dangerous to people with heart and lung problems. One of my neighbors just went to the hospital because of a possible heart attack. Thankfully, tomorrow our air quality should be better.

Here is a map of the forest fires if anyone cares.

https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/firemap.aspx

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: August 28th, 2017, 6:58 pm
by zetreque
Every summer there are a lot of bad fires but it really does seem like they are increasing in numbers. Wow, at 500hPa (which is a measure of air pressure aka altitude) you can see the high pressure zone around AZ. That's a lot of hot rising air down there!

https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/w ... 39.99,1174

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: August 31st, 2017, 11:59 am
by Athena
Yeah, a lot of hot air, and thank goodness it did rise and get blown away! We finally have a blue sky and can breathe easy. For awhile, people with asthma felt like an elephant was sitting on their chest. Even for those without asthma, it was not pleasant.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 3rd, 2017, 10:07 pm
by Athena
Our air quality got to the hazardous level today. This means no one should be outside if that can be avoided. If I could, I would leave for the coast just to have better air to breathe. It was not pleasant being outside.

There is a fire burning closer to us, and there may be an evacuation nervously close to us. At least I am nervous about the fire threaten the Mckenzie bridge area. That is in easy driving distance of Eugene, and we won't have rain until Wednesday. This is one time when everyone will be glad to see rain! Does anyone know how fast a fire moves? The passes to the coast are narrow and they could be easily jammed if many people were wanting to get out the valley. Might it be safer to use the freeway and go north first and then over to the coast? I wish I had more information.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 3rd, 2017, 10:20 pm
by zetreque
I spent 2 days on the coast. Smoke was really thick there despite being a couple hundred miles WEST of the nearest fire. I thought wind patterns were mostly west to east inland but I guess not.



I had a conversation with my mom today that the smoke air quality seems to be getting progressively worse over the past 35 summers. This is due to human changes, natural changes, and policy changes on forest management.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 4th, 2017, 9:41 am
by Braininvat
Huge cloud of thick smoke, from the PNW, pushed along and concentrated by a cool front, came down here yesterday, lasted until the front moved on through by 9pm. People were advised not to be physically active outside. My eyes were stinging. I think this year's abundance of wildfires is mainly due to the western drought. Athena, I've heard that certain plants, like Swedish Ivy, make good indoor air scrubbers if you have bad air getting in. I would get lots of potted ivy, or similar, if I were still living in the Willamette. And maybe a negative ion generator, to pull some of the particulates out, if that's affordable.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 4th, 2017, 12:29 pm
by zetreque
Braininvat » Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:41 am wrote:Huge cloud of thick smoke, from the PNW, pushed along and concentrated by a cool front, came down here yesterday, lasted until the front moved on through by 9pm. People were advised not to be physically active outside. My eyes were stinging. I think this year's abundance of wildfires is mainly due to the western drought. Athena, I've heard that certain plants, like Swedish Ivy, make good indoor air scrubbers if you have bad air getting in. I would get lots of potted ivy, or similar, if I were still living in the Willamette. And maybe a negative ion generator, to pull some of the particulates out, if that's affordable.



The ironic thing is we didn't have a drought last winter. They had flooding and dam problems. Long term there is a drought though.

The bad air quality never stops those bicyclists from biking over mountains which I don't understand why they do that along highways anyway breathing in all the diesel fumes from trucks. Every time I see one of those bicyclists I imagine what their lungs must look like from an old TV ad showing what a smokers lungs look like.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 4th, 2017, 12:53 pm
by Athena
zetreque » September 3rd, 2017, 8:20 pm wrote:I spent 2 days on the coast. Smoke was really thick there despite being a couple hundred miles WEST of the nearest fire. I thought wind patterns were mostly west to east inland but I guess not.



I had a conversation with my mom today that the smoke air quality seems to be getting progressively worse over the past 35 summers. This is due to human changes, natural changes, and policy changes on forest management.


Yeah I heard other coast reports about smoke. There is a fire by the south coast.

Part of the problem is high air pressure preventing the nice breeze from the west. This should start changing today and by Wednesday we should have rain.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 4th, 2017, 1:37 pm
by Athena
Braininvat » September 4th, 2017, 7:41 am wrote:Huge cloud of thick smoke, from the PNW, pushed along and concentrated by a cool front, came down here yesterday, lasted until the front moved on through by 9pm. People were advised not to be physically active outside. My eyes were stinging. I think this year's abundance of wildfires is mainly due to the western drought. Athena, I've heard that certain plants, like Swedish Ivy, make good indoor air scrubbers if you have bad air getting in. I would get lots of potted ivy, or similar, if I were still living in the Willamette. And maybe a negative ion generator, to pull some of the particulates out, if that's affordable.


I have some inside ivy. And for sure, if we have another summer like this one, I will be getting a negative ion generator to clean my air. I do not remember a year when smoke was such a problem.

Oops, wait a minute, I think I see more sun shine! I just checked our air quality and we are down from hazardous to unhealthy. Perhaps the expected improvement has already begun? I pray it has because my desire to get out of the smoke and heat was ruling me yesterday, and that was not a good day because I had things I had to do outside of my home and was doing them against my will to do them. My normally happy inner child was not happy, and my inner adult was scolding my inner child for throwing a fit, making matters even worse.

Today I will be responsible for the care of dependent people, and I am preparing myself to do better than I did yesterday. This will be so much easier if the smoke isn't as bad as it was yesterday.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 5th, 2017, 9:14 am
by Athena
Tuesday....I opened my windows this morning for the cool air, smelled smokey, checked the air quality and closed my windows. We are back up to the highest limit of hazardous. The level no one should be breathing air this bad. Our chance of rain on Wednesday has dropped to 20%. Our temperature should dip but goes back to 90 after a few cooler days.


http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35926513-75/eugene-springfield-holds-its-breath-waiting-for-weather-change-to-rid-area-of-excessive-smoke.html.csp

The bad air, which limited visibility to less than a mile at its peak early Monday afternoon before receding, has been sending people to local emergency rooms with respiratory problems.

Sarah Allen, spokeswoman for PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend in Springfield, said its emergency room admitted 157 patients reporting shortness of breath in August, when air quality began deteriorating. That compares to the 57 patients the ER admitted the previous month, when the air was good. Allen said there was an increase in admissions this weekend, although the exact number was unavailable Monday.....

The hazardous smoke prompted the McKenzie School District to postpone the start of school to Thursday from Tuesday. The district includes several communities along the McKenzie Highway that have been notified to prepare for possible evacuation because of wildfires....


I don't think I would be sending my child to school as long as there was a possibility of an evacuation? I think I would want to know more about how the levels of danger are determined. That is a mountainous rural area and being a long distance from my child in school when there was a possibility of having to out run a fire, would make me very nervous. Our schools don't have air conditioning, and children who have air conditioning at home would be better to stay home.

Further, from the forest fire, schools are counseling outside activity and game practices. The U of O foot ball team will go to the coast for practice. Considering their big win last Saturday, maybe they deserve a trip to the coast? We had just enough window of improved air quality to have the game last Saturday.

Air quality was so bad my friend who flew in Monday, thought her plane might be diverted to Portland because visibility here had dropped to one mile. Fortunately, before the plane got here, visibility increased to 5 miles. Visibility is back down to 1 mile. For fliers that means going to Portland and taking a two-hour bus ride to Eugene. I bet that is really messing with some people's plans!

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 5th, 2017, 9:34 am
by Athena
zetreque » September 4th, 2017, 10:29 am wrote:
Braininvat » Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:41 am wrote:Huge cloud of thick smoke, from the PNW, pushed along and concentrated by a cool front, came down here yesterday, lasted until the front moved on through by 9pm. People were advised not to be physically active outside. My eyes were stinging. I think this year's abundance of wildfires is mainly due to the western drought. Athena, I've heard that certain plants, like Swedish Ivy, make good indoor air scrubbers if you have bad air getting in. I would get lots of potted ivy, or similar, if I were still living in the Willamette. And maybe a negative ion generator, to pull some of the particulates out, if that's affordable.



The ironic thing is we didn't have a drought last winter. They had flooding and dam problems. Long term there is a drought though.

The bad air quality never stops those bicyclists from biking over mountains which I don't understand why they do that along highways anyway breathing in all the diesel fumes from trucks. Every time I see one of those bicyclists I imagine what their lungs must look like from an old TV ad showing what a smokers lungs look like.



The Mckenzie pass is where there is an evacuation possibility and it is a favorite cross country bike route. The road is a narrow mountain road with sometimes poor visibility around corners, and with no place for a bicyclist to go when a car or truck is coming. This is an insane situation that should be corrected.

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 5th, 2017, 8:54 pm
by JMP1958
Now a teenager playing with fireworks has started a fire in the Columbia Gorge; 10,000 acres and growing. I live in Portland just about 23 miles East of Multnomah falls. Starting last night and into today, we had ash falling from the sky here and the air quality level is "unhealthy".

Re: Washington and Oregon on fire

PostPosted: September 7th, 2017, 12:47 pm
by Braininvat
When we lived in Corvallis for 6 years, the air quality never seemed too spectacular in the winter, even when there were no forest fires. Seemed like inversions, and general lack of wind, would hold smoke from woodstoves over the town, and I often questioned the fitness value of taking jogs when the air was smoky. I had something bordering on a "smoker's cough," the last couple years there, which vanished promptly when we moved back to the windy Great Plains. The worst place I traveled in Oregon was Springfield (saw the home of Theodore Sturgeon), which had a sulfurous pall over it from the Weyerhauser plant.

The first year there, I thought of Oregonians as weather wimps, it all seemed so mild, but when I realized the rigors of sunless winters, endless drizzle, and breathing the air, I began to see their pluck.

I really miss the OG trees now, and the trips to the coast - watching whales at Depoe Bay, hiking down the open beaches, beauty spots like Bandon, the sea lion caves, kite flyers, tasty crabs and Tillamook cheese, the living history thing at Fort Clatsop (which I hear burned down in the 2000's and was rebuilt), the Aquarium at Newport, etc.