Ecohome

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Ecohome

Postby justathought on February 13th, 2011, 9:54 am 

I was just given a project in AP Environmental Science. The project is to design and make a small scale eco-friendly home. I have a lot of interesting designs but i was interested in other people's designs. There are a number of fields that need concern including Electricity, heating, cooling, insulation, food, light, transportation, clean water, hot water, grey water, sewage water, and of course location. Any ideas?
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Re: Ecohome

Postby Fuqin on February 13th, 2011, 11:30 am 

I can’t really help you with the house but I can give you some ideas about your outdoor living space, passive solar design in what I do is nearly always a priority in gardens in Western Australia, but in applies worldwide, 1stly you want to consider the use of deciduous trees( trees that loose there leaves in winter) bioregional if possible where to plant them will depend on your latitude( find out what your sun angles are winter and summer) and hemisphere (nth or Sth) if south like me plant your trees on the nth of the house so that they shade the nth wall of the house in summer loose there leaves in winter and allow the sun to warm the house, you will probably want a permaculture garden I could go into it but there is a wealth of info on the net, books by David Holmgren , bill Mollison , and if you want to get right into the science of ecology try Howard T Odum, in any case production gardens are hard work but I always recommend balancing production plants out with lots of bioregional plant species ,provide nest boxes and a pond you want birds and insects these are your pollinators your local nursery’s might have a list , its important environmentally because these are the Absolut minimum maintenance plants i.e. you don’t waste water on them and they attract the local native fauna – this assist with the restoration of biodiversity, any how hope that helps a bit.
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Re: Ecohome

Postby Natural ChemE on February 13th, 2011, 1:31 pm 

justathought,

We're a bit restricted in what we can say since, well, it's your project to do. Still, I'd recommend looking into ways to keep from losing thermal energy. You want your hot water hot, your cold water cold, and your rooms room temperature, your over hot, your refrig cool, etc. Since heat will leak across boundaries, it's probably worth considering how you'd group things such as pipes, heats, and coolers together.

Kind of a waste to have an oven use up tons of energy to heat up, warm up some food, only to then have all of that heat escape into a house that you're trying to keep cool in the summer, right?
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Re: Ecohome

Postby CanadysPeak on February 13th, 2011, 5:43 pm 

I'd look at a traditional house in, say, Botswana. Your eco-friendly house will require that sort of simplicity.
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Re: Ecohome

Postby Fuqin on February 14th, 2011, 10:13 am 

Your eco-friendly house will require that sort of simplicity.

Well like most things that appear simple the fact is they had centuries of trial and error not really that simple however id agree that to some existent that traditional dwellings offer a key insight into how things should be done, After all they’ve done all the hard work already ,in terms of how eco flow goes , simple and with minimal impact to the environment, but! I don’t know about a thatched roof, cold at night hot during the day, however your suggestion to investigate traditional styles is excellent I think, even in landscape design we had to look at tradition it’s very informative, a Botswana circular design certainly has its advantages it’s just very expensive with more modern matirials and im assuming justathought that whatever you design will have to pass some kind of residential code or local government approval ,however traditional designs are of great value Canadys’s Botswana house Being African is probably round,[ good], thatched roof to which I say [not real good], but it might have a court yard arrangement, this is a very good tried and true design used extensively in the Mediterranean and china also, it works because seasonally you can take advantage of a variety of aspects and situations that you can’t do with the box and fire place of England . to which the standard house design of modernity clings to irrationally, but that’s economics I suspect more than culture.
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