Sounds like fun (literally)

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Sounds like fun (literally)

Postby vivian maxine on September 11th, 2016, 9:10 am 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... ce+News%29

By playing specially constructed melodies scientists can move small objects on a plate toward desired targets. Play games? Write messages? Sounds fun.
Last edited by zetreque on September 11th, 2016, 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: added to title
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Re: Sounds like fun

Postby Braininvat on September 11th, 2016, 10:47 am 

Paging Faradave!

Hopefully he will soon emerge from his Faradave cage....
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Re: Sounds like fun

Postby Athena on September 11th, 2016, 1:37 pm 

The article reminded me of Pythagoras and musical spheres so I googled that and got this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_resonance

I have played with speakers underneath a surface with sand on it and watched the sand bounce into interesting designs. It was fascinating to me.
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Re: Sounds like fun

Postby vivian maxine on September 11th, 2016, 1:44 pm 

Athena » September 11th, 2016, 12:37 pm wrote:The article reminded me of Pythagoras and musical spheres so I googled that and got this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_resonance

I have played with speakers underneath a surface with sand on it and watched the sand bounce into interesting designs. It was fascinating to me.


The same with people dancing to music. Music has patterns and nature follows those. Fascinating, isn't it?
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Re: Serving up music on a plate.

Postby Faradave on September 11th, 2016, 10:37 pm 

Thanks for the 'heads up" Biv. There are a lot of videos available on Chladni plates, such as this one:


Most use a single central vibrator (typically an audio speaker) but with compact, inexpensive exciters available multi-channel sources are easily created. This would make possible dynamic interference patterns far more complex than those shown above.

I found the most interesting aspect of the referenced report was that the investigators let a computer try different frequencies until a desired particle motion was achieved. This is a self learning method, which may be a lot simpler than trying to calculate shifting interference patterns that produce the desired complex trajectories.

"Based on the detected positions, the computer goes through a list of music notes to find a note that is most likely to move the objects towards the desired directions. After playing the note, the new positions of the objects are detected, and the control cycle is restarted. This cycle is repeated until the objects have reached their desired target locations."

Keep in mind that all this changes with plate size, material, exciter pattern and particle type (I like corn meal.)

With respect to my orthosonic lift, when i use exciter arrays on a wing, I can use particles to indicate nodes (where air pressure transverse to the wing will be higher) and antinodes where lift will be maximal. It can be advantageous to vent the wing with holes at the nodes.
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