"Give Me The Simple Life"

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"Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby vivian maxine on July 21st, 2016, 10:32 am 

It did feel good to read this. Bless my little flip phone

http://askbobrankin.com/flip_the_rise_o ... sd3SheP6SL
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Braininvat on July 21st, 2016, 11:29 am 

As a fellow flipper, I thank you, Viv. Yes, I love the way it fits in a pocket, stays charged for days, withstands falls, and doesn't have 743 bells and whistles that are a total waste of time. If I need the Internet, I have a tablet at home, a PC at work, and a laptop I can also mooch. The notion that I must be connected, every waking moment is absurd and (as discussed ad nauseum hereabouts) unhealthy to "being here now."

I also like that I can shut it off, and when I need to check it, it turns on in about 3 seconds, since it doesn't have an operating system to boot up and apps to load.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby eagle on May 5th, 2017, 12:16 am 

After recently getting a new "smart" phone that spams me non stop, has a hard-to-use touchscreen keyboard, and seems to require a lot more maintenance than a phone, the "good old days" do indeed sound relieving! :) Still, we must also confess that the newer phones can do some things that flip phones can't, like relatively advanced web activities (although still a huge hassle!).
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Braininvat on May 5th, 2017, 9:13 am 

I suppose it's a more philosophical question of why do we need to do "relatively advanced web activities" while we are taking a stroll, enjoying a meal and conversation, or many other parts of our lives. Why must we be on an electronic leash all the time? What happened, also, to the virtues of occasional solitude?
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby eagle on May 5th, 2017, 9:29 am 

Just because a feature is available doesn't mean we have to use it. There are times when we are in a place where we want to learn or create something, for example, and a smart phone seems like the best option. Also, many include usable cameras, microphones, and other tools for interacting with nature.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Serpent on May 5th, 2017, 9:58 am 

We have a cell phone to take on trips.
It doesn't play movies, order pizza, take my blood pressure, estimate the odds of poker hands, play endless identical tracks of jungle-music, send pictures of my lunch to friends on diets, or hack the bank of Monte Carlo. I have never missed those features.
We have used it four times in three years - twice for CAA rescue, once to check on an ailing friend, once to call a restaurant whether we left a credit card there (yes). We always have a whole lot of minutes to roll over when they force us to get the next model.

No, we're not technophobes: my SO is responsible for a slew of 20th century computer innovation; I've helped design graphics for websites, and do most of my research on the 'net. It's just, we have less and less to communicate with less and less of the world, as our generation dies off.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Braininvat on May 5th, 2017, 12:10 pm 

eagle » May 5th, 2017, 6:29 am wrote:Just because a feature is available doesn't mean we have to use it. There are times when we are in a place where we want to learn or create something, for example, and a smart phone seems like the best option. Also, many include usable cameras, microphones, and other tools for interacting with nature.
(boldface mine)

Eagle, I think that last sentence has pinpointed one of my reservations about technology as a means to interact with nature. It seems to me that viewing a portable computer/camera/recorder as somehow adding to the experience of nature can take a person farther from that primal and essential communion, the raw sensations of walking in the woods, one animal among many, sensing a world that is not filtered by human artifice, hearing the birds and the wind in the trees, feeling the earth through our feet, smelling the variegated scents of growing things, the sun dappling our skin, and so on. There are places where we should let our eyes and ears and noses and skin record what is going on, unmediated by a packaged corporate product that inevitably frames and diminishes the natural world.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Heavy_Water on May 5th, 2017, 12:33 pm 

vivian maxine » July 21st, 2016, 9:32 am wrote:It did feel good to read this. Bless my little flip phone

http://askbobrankin.com/flip_the_rise_o ... sd3SheP6SL



This is spot on, mate! And I am with you all the way.

We park our cars in the same garage.

Although I am very tech savvy, I too am a flip phone holdout. Never owned a smart phone, and never will. I refuse to be one of those silly looking androids walking around staring at their phones. One of those dolts who cannot manage even life's most mundane tasks, like shopping or driving or walking down the street, or checking out at the store, without consulting their phone. These people think they're cool? LOL. They have little idea that some of us laugh at them.

My wife is a high school nurse. She tells me that girls are having full-on panic and anxiety attacks when they get to school sometimes and realize they left their phones at home! When she told me this I immediately got the idea to consider basing my MA Thesis on a related topic of this. I plan to do some controlled studies to see if young adults and teens deprived of their phones for a few days indeed incur some psychological maladies. I am currently in the process of writing a proposal and abstract on this idea for submission to me thesis advisor.
I'll keep ya posted.

Cheers.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Braininvat on May 5th, 2017, 12:40 pm 

My son has deliberately abandoned his cellphone for extended periods, and reported some positive results. Perhaps you could include him in your proposed study? :-)

It's very heartening to see the "leave the phone at home in a drawer" trend among some of his peers.

BTW, I believe Vivian is a lady. Or is "mate" a unisex term in Texas? Maybe I've hung out with too many Australians and Brits and have a skewed view of American slang?
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby eagle on May 5th, 2017, 12:46 pm 

Braininvat » May 5th, 2017, 12:10 pm wrote:
eagle » May 5th, 2017, 6:29 am wrote:Just because a feature is available doesn't mean we have to use it. There are times when we are in a place where we want to learn or create something, for example, and a smart phone seems like the best option. Also, many include usable cameras, microphones, and other tools for interacting with nature.
(boldface mine)

Eagle, I think that last sentence has pinpointed one of my reservations about technology as a means to interact with nature. It seems to me that viewing a portable computer/camera/recorder as somehow adding to the experience of nature can take a person farther from that primal and essential communion, the raw sensations of walking in the woods, one animal among many, sensing a world that is not filtered by human artifice, hearing the birds and the wind in the trees, feeling the earth through our feet, smelling the variegated scents of growing things, the sun dappling our skin, and so on. There are places where we should let our eyes and ears and noses and skin record what is going on, unmediated by a packaged corporate product that inevitably frames and diminishes the natural world.


I agree with you that there are many experiences best done without mediating technology. However, at least for some of us, smart phones and related tools can also enhance certain experiences by giving us new ways to sense our world. They can also help by connecting us together to share those experiences with people we care about, and by enabling us to look back later at recordings of our earlier experiences.

Of course, I recognize that tastes vary and that you and others may not feel the same way.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Dave_Oblad on May 5th, 2017, 12:52 pm 

Hi Heavy_Water,

I am also a contributor to technology. I design Phones and write code for same. But I don't own a Cell Phone and rarely take calls on my Land-Line. A few years back I was on a trip to New York and was walking down a busy street. Like 95% of the pedestrians had phones held to their heads, oblivious to their surroundings. Even couples walking together had more interest in talking to someone else than their mates.

I don't get it...

What aspect of our Existence makes us feel we must be in constant communication with others?

I'm going to retire soon (I'm 66) and I am mentoring a young student to step into my shoes, to take over my job so I can leave and retire. Every time I turn around and back, he's messaging someone and not paying attention. Very annoying. But he get panicky if I request that he leave the phone at the door or turn the dang thing off.

It's clearly an addiction that I don't understand.

Regards,
Dave :^)
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Serpent on May 5th, 2017, 6:31 pm 

Dave_Oblad » May 5th, 2017, 11:52 am wrote:
What aspect of our Existence makes us feel we must be in constant communication with others?

The fact that we're social animals. There was, in fact, quite a lot of mental anguish and illness related to the alienation of our own times. Of all times. Urban people are especially prone to social dislocations - a slightly different one for each generation - and generational fads.

It's clearly an addiction that I don't understand.

It's not easy to understand any addiction - but there is always a reason behind it; a driving social pressure.
The young have their way of staying within scent of their herd, just as we had ours - patchouli oil and pot, for one segment; beer and locker room for another; hairspray and diet Pepsi...etc. (I'm not calling you my generation, necessarily; you may be a high-end X-er, while I'm a mid-boomer).
Unless we figure out what's causing the malaise, and address the root causes, people will find ways to feel less anxious, less isolated, less disconnected.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby zetreque on May 5th, 2017, 7:05 pm 

There are many articles on this town so I just pulled one of them. If it came to vote to ban wireless electronics where I live I'd vote for it. :)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... vices.html

The cellphone-free town in West Virginia that offers people who are 'allergic' to radio waves escape from the modern world

Wireless electronics are banned in Green Bank, West Virginia
It is in the National Radio Quiet Zone, which was set up to minimize disturbance around the National Radio Astronomy Observatory
Town has just 147 residents, including people who believe they suffer from 'electromagnetic sensitivity' which leaves them in pain
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 6:35 am 

I have been recently reading here, there and everywhere that being part of a social group was the "normal" and isolationist loners were the sick ones. Now, suddenly, it is the opposite. While I do agree with Dave in what he says, might I suggest that both may be perfectly acceptable? Or, are we all sick?

On the other hand - as my early morning thoughts ramble, is being constantly in touch by cell phone the same as being a social person? Does the cell phone world hide a lot of loners who are afraid to be in touch for real? Maybe this is their desperate way of being in touch without touching?

Dave?
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Dave_Oblad on May 6th, 2017, 7:04 am 

Hi Vivian,

I think the content of the messages say's a lot. Granted, there is value in telling your spouse you will be late for dinner.. but..

But I doubt these messages represent a deep communication or exchange of conflicting points of view. I could be mistaken but aren't most such messages just basic babble?

For example:

"What are you doing now?"
"Watching TV."
"What are you Watching?"
"An old rerun of NCIS.
"Who is starring?"
"What's his name that was in that movie about frogs."
"The one where the Frogs took over the resort?"
"No, the one where the Frogs are fighting over the Lily Pads."
"Is Kermit in that one?"
"I don't think so, who is Kermit?"
"He's the frog that's in love with Miss Piggy."
"Does Kermit ever eat Bacon?"
"Rotflmao..."
"So what are you doing?"
"Waiting in line at the store."
"Which store?"
...................................

You get the idea?

If so, please explain it to me.. lol.

It seems it's all about a feeling of being connected, subject matter doesn't seem to matter.

Best wishes,
Dave :^)
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Dave_Oblad on May 6th, 2017, 7:56 am 

Hi again,

Another point about these phones. My Boss bought (gifted) me one. He said it was so we could coordinate our actions, because he was going to arrive in NYC a day before me to setup our presentation.

A. I do not want my Boss to have instant access to me 24/7. NOOooooooo way...

But, on getting to NYC, I tried to use the new Cell Phone. I'm an Engineer but had never used a Cell Phone before.. but how hard could it be? Well, I ended up accidentally Locking the dang thing up.. so nothing worked on it. I resorted to a Pay Telephone Booth to find out where our hotel room was. It was the Best 75 cents I ever spent.

The Cell Phone had to be returned to the place of purchase because no one could figure out how to unlock it. I ended up refusing his gift (mostly for reason (A) above). I simply said that if an Engineer can't figure out how to use the thing, then it was not designed very well (human engineered).

For receiving service calls from the field from installers with Cell Phones.. 90% dropped the call in the middle of a crucial communication step, or the break-up was so bad I couldn't understand the issue that they needed help on.

Another time I had an important face-to-face meeting with a guy.. that should have taken only 15 minutes. Instead, it took almost 2 hours.. because he kept on taking "Important" calls during our meeting. I almost grabbed his phone to stomp on it. This happens a lot actually.

Long story short.. I hate the dang things and will never own one personally. Even my Land Line at home is now compromised and I get about 10 Spam calls per day while I'm trying to work at home. I specifically wanted an unlisted number, but my service provider (accidentally?) listed me in the phone directory.

I'm moving soon and may never get another Phone connection. I'll just stick with my Internet where most of the Spam is filtered out.

Regards,
Dave :^)
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 8:05 am 

Simple answer, Dave. Look again. I did say I agree with you.

A bit of additon which is unrelated to what your are saying. A lot of those people you see on phones aren't even in touch with anyone. They are playing games. I walk by a neighbor who is "buried" on his phone and say "are you winning?" His face lights up and he starts telling me all about this wonderful game he is playing. Now he is in touch.

Still - full circle - I did say I agree with you in what you are pointing out.
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Re: "Give Me The Simple Life"

Postby Serpent on May 6th, 2017, 10:14 am 

vivian maxine » May 6th, 2017, 5:35 am wrote:I have been recently reading here, there and everywhere that being part of a social group was the "normal" and isolationist loners were the sick ones. Now, suddenly, it is the opposite.

Just because conformity to the first premise has gone far enough too far to have become an obvious problem. People are literally walking into lampposts and under buses.

It has always seemed to me that Americans were awfully quick to label one another deviant or sick or weird or just plain wrong. There is a very strong drive to conformity. This may be no different from other countries, it just seems peculiar in a nation that so loudly prides itself on rugged individualism.

In my youth, the standard was cheerful optimism: anyone who expected rain on the weekend, didn't laugh at the stooges, or pointed to the flaw in a plan was medicated into uniform bliss. Anyone who didn't start dating six months after their spouse died was offered counseling. Anxiety was an illness; being shy or bookish was a disorder; anger was always inappropriate and melancholy or a negative self-image was downright forbidden.
And, of course, being unable to attain the ideal happy state, the entire nation constantly self-medicated with sugar, salt, saturated fats and caffeine, besides the drugs - legal and ill- and gadgets and novelties, fashions and body-enhancements.
Which was all very, very good for business (and very bad for the cost of health care).

An artificial model of social/psychological health doesn't create the desired condition - it just makes people feel bad about not being able to feel as good as they're supposed to. It's the secular version of the religious double-bind: set an impossible standard and blame the subject who doesn't attain it; better yet, make the subject blame himself.
Of course, what actually happens is that people feel the way they feel, regardless. They just have to hide it some way. The ways of hiding socially disapproved feelings change according to current events and technologies. Right now, the young are seeking refuge, oblivion, relief, escape and solace in their mobile devices. (plus sugar, salt, fat and caffeine)

The feelings we're told are inappropriate and must be hidden do not arise from maladjustment. They are a response to something in our environment. But we can't question what's really making people unhappy; why so many are failing to meet the standard; why so many are malfunctioning. Investigation of the root causes of social malaise is potentially upsetting to the status quo.

Kids will give up their herding bahaviour, games and music when they're offered a new form of escape
- or a better reason to live.
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Postby vivian maxine on May 6th, 2017, 10:40 am 

Well said, serpent. Way back when we went through a stage of "is everybody normal". Psychological tests were a favourite topic. Last I knew, some schools still jumped for the IQ test as soon as they saw a student who didn't do his homework.

The other day I saw an editorial that was headed "Be yourself --- but not at work." Didn't read it.

Shall say no more.
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