Glycolysis Oxidation States

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Glycolysis Oxidation States

Postby caters on August 25th, 2014, 3:49 pm 

I figured out the oxidation states and how they change in each reaction of glycolysis

Glucose:

O = -2

C1 = +1

C2-5 = 0

C6 = -1

H = +1



Glucose 6-Phosphate

C = no change

O bonded to phosphate = -1

P = +5

Other Os = no change

Here O has been oxidized by phosphate



Fructose 6-Phosphate

C3-C4 = no change

C2 = +2

C1 = -1

O = no change

P = no change

Here C2 was oxidized and C1 was reduced in the isomerization from glucose to fructose



Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate

O bonded to phosphate: -1

P = +5

C = no change

Again O has been oxidized by phosphate

Since both of the O's were oxidized by phosphate and ATP was used that means that the ATP has been reduced



Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate

C3 = -1

C2 = +2

C1 = -1

C3 is bonded to O which is bonded to phosphate and C1 is bonded to OH. OH takes priority over phosphate.

C3 has been reduced



Phosphoglyceraldehyde

C3 = -1

C2 = 0

C1 = +1

In the isomerization C2 has been reduced and C1 has been oxidized



1,3-Bisphosphoglycerate

C1 = +3

O bonded to phosphate = -1

Here both C1 and the O have been oxidized



3-phosphoglycerate

O- = -1

O didn't change its oxidation state but it did become negatively charged


2-phosphoglycerate

O in OH = -2

O- = no change

O bonded to phosphate = -1

Here the phosphate moved to the other O and so the O that was originally bonded to the phosphate has been reduced and the O bonded to C2 has been oxidized. ADP was also oxidized to ATP when 1 phosphate came off of 1,3-Bisphosphoglycerate.



Phosphenolpyruvate(I don't know why phenol is put in there when there isn't actually a benzene ring bonded to an OH(Which is what phenol is). Why not just phosphopyruvate or something along those lines?)

C3 = -2

C2 = +1

C2 has been oxidized and C3 has been reduced.



Pyruvate

O=C2 = -2

C3 = -3

C2 = +2

Here the O has been reduced, C3 has been reduced, and C2 has been oxidized. ADP has also been oxidized to ATP.

Now how does this mean that glucose has been oxidized to pyruvate when as you just saw with the oxidation states and how they changed the glucose has been both oxidized and reduced?
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Re: Glycolysis Oxidation States

Postby BioWizard on August 25th, 2014, 3:55 pm 

It's not phosphenol pyruvate. It's phospho-enol pyruvate. Like you said, there's no benzene ring. Also the "oxidation" of glucose to pyruate considers the net change over the whole process. The steps ultimately extract electrons from glucose - which counts as oxidation.
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Re: Glycolysis Oxidation States

Postby caters on August 25th, 2014, 4:28 pm 

BioWizard » August 25th, 2014, 3:55 pm wrote:It's not phosphenol pyruvate. It's phospho-enol pyruvate. Like you said, there's no benzene ring. Also the "oxidation" of glucose to pyruate considers the net change over the whole process. The steps ultimately extract electrons from glucose - which counts as oxidation.


So even though the individual reactions have reduction and oxidation or 1 or more atoms the overall reaction of glucose + 2 ATP -> 2 pyruvate + 4 ATP + 2 NADH is oxidation.
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Re: Glycolysis Oxidation States

Postby BioWizard on August 25th, 2014, 4:40 pm 

caters » 25 Aug 2014 04:28 pm wrote:
BioWizard » August 25th, 2014, 3:55 pm wrote:It's not phosphenol pyruvate. It's phospho-enol pyruvate. Like you said, there's no benzene ring. Also the "oxidation" of glucose to pyruate considers the net change over the whole process. The steps ultimately extract electrons from glucose - which counts as oxidation.


So even though the individual reactions have reduction and oxidation or 1 or more atoms the overall reaction of glucose + 2 ATP -> 2 pyruvate + 4 ATP + 2 NADH is oxidation.


Yep, electrons are taken from glucose and passed along to NAD+ (to give NADH).
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