Transduction - blocking with BSA

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Transduction - blocking with BSA

Postby iym on August 28th, 2014, 8:55 am 

'm interested to know what the BSA blocking does after coating retronectin plates. Does anyone know

Basically, retonectin coated plates are exposed to PBS+2%BSA for 30 minutes in RT for "blocking". why is this done? The retronectin are coating the plates in order to bind the virus to the bottom of the well, add cells, which also adhese to the cells and thus enable an easier integration of the virus into the cell.

Thanks!
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Re: Transduction - blocking with BSA

Postby BioWizard on August 28th, 2014, 9:08 am 

Typically, "blockers" like BSA are added to reduce non-specific protein-protein interactions, or any kind of interactions that would lead to non-specific protein binding (such as to the coated surface). This way any "sticky" surfaces will be covered up by BSA, and the epitopes that specifically bind to the viral proteins will remain exposed. The result is a decrease in noise levels and an increase in specificity, sensitivity, or in this case probably efficacy.
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Re: Transduction - blocking with BSA

Postby iym on August 28th, 2014, 3:51 pm 

Thank you for your answer!!! Helped me a lot
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Re: Transduction - blocking with BSA

Postby BioWizard on August 28th, 2014, 5:08 pm 

iym » 28 Aug 2014 03:51 pm wrote:Thank you for your answer!!! Helped me a lot


Great. No problem, you're welcome.
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