Gatorade

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Gatorade

Postby catchcolette on September 19th, 2014, 5:14 pm 

If Gatorades contain electrolytes, how is that helping conquer thirst?
Last edited by BioWizard on September 22nd, 2014, 8:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby owleye on September 20th, 2014, 2:20 am 

Is that one of its claims? As far as I know, Gatorade and similar drinks are intended to replenish something that was lost (or will be lost) during exercise, presumably through sweating, not to quench thirst.

However, I have to say that I have some concern about what goes into these drinks. One of its features is that one can down great gulps of it quickly, and to some extent un-satisfyingly.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby Paralith on September 20th, 2014, 3:08 am 

The issue is not whether or not you feel thirsty, it's whether or not your body is hydrated and has the right balance of nutrients in the blood stream - electrolytes. When you work out and you sweat, you lose both water and electrolytes. The loss of both these things effects your body's performance under continued physical work. If you drink just pure water, number one you're not replenishing those electrolytes, and number two what electrolytes you have left become highly diluted. The balance between water and electrolytes gets thrown off. Your body does not like this imbalance (because, gone too far, it can in fact do real damage) and will try to fix the imbalance and will resist absorbing even more water that would make the imbalance even worse. So even if you drink more and more water, it's more likely to just go straight through you and not to the places that need it. Gatorade and all the many other sports drinks out there add electrolytes so that you can both replenish your body's electrolyte supply and enable your body to more quickly absorb more water. This double boost of electrolytes and efficient hydration improves performance and helps prevent dehydration.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby zetreque on September 20th, 2014, 12:26 pm 

What Paralith said,

But I will add to keep in mind that these drinks are meant for extreme athletes. Water is better for every day people. The problem is that they sell and market these drinks to kids and people that are simply on their lunch breaks.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby Braininvat on September 20th, 2014, 9:59 pm 

I tried G'ade once, yrs ago, and thought it tasted like sweetened sweat. Water and a few bites of banana, or raisins, will do the job. And sodium...very rare for people eating a western diet to experience depletion. I worked in a foundry, one summer in college - only time I ever needed to add salt to food.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby BioWizard on September 22nd, 2014, 8:15 am 

Yes to what others said.

But also one more point that might be the most direct answer to this question: glucose and sodium (electrolytes) are required for maximum water absorption. Our intestines are tightly controlled membranes that selectively uptake nutrients, and should not be thought of as mere semi-permeable membranes that work along concentration gradients. Water, for example, is co-transported across the intestinal membrane via a specialized channel called the Na+/glucose transporter. This channel internalizes ~ 250 molecules of water with every molecule of glucose and 2 atoms of sodium. That's why these drinks have sugar and salt in them. They enable more water to enter your blood stream. Now the trick is to balance the sugar and salt in a way that allows you to get maximum water absorption without overdoing it and then causing too much water loss in the process of eliminating the extra salts.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby zetreque on September 22nd, 2014, 12:05 pm 

osmotic pressure.
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Re: Gatorade

Postby BioWizard on September 22nd, 2014, 12:12 pm 

zetreque » 22 Sep 2014 12:05 pm wrote:osmotic pressure.


In general yes, but the ingredients in gatorade aren't truly geared towards that. You can get an "osmotically gentle" solution with just PBS (phosphatase buffer saline), or if I recall correctly, just 0.7-0.9% salt solution (which may not be as pH stable as PBS though).
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