The 'New Planck Units'

Discussions on classical and modern physics, quantum mechanics, particle physics, thermodynamics, general and special relativity, etc.

The 'New Planck Units'

Postby BurtJordaan on September 14th, 2014, 12:59 pm 

Marshall and I proposed the following set of 'natural units' and symbols for our Forum.

The starting premise is that , and are good natural units, meaningful proportions that are built into nature. This is like the garden gate through which one enters.

is the limiting speed

is the inherent limit on exactness

is the force expressing the stiffness of geometry. It governs how geometry interacts with matter, because the GR equation basically says:

curvature = , where is matter density.

Curvature is a reciprocal area ("per sq. foot") quantity, and if you multiply force by curvature you get quantities such as pressure and density, describing the concentration of matter. The GR equation's tells, among other things, the concentration of matter that would be needed to produce a given curvature in the geometry---it hitches up the two things. These three: , , , are woven into existence at a basic level, so we take them as natural units.

Moving on, we show the path to the other natural units, and each one should be Google-calculable so we can get the automatic metric equivalent whenever we want. Simply paste the right-most part of each equation into Google, press enter or search, and you should get an answer in normal metric units.

Force: = c^4/(8pi G)

Area: = hbar*8pi G/c^3

Length: = (hbar*8pi G/c^3)^.5

Time: = (hbar*8pi G/c^5)^.5

Energy: = (hbar*c^5/(8pi G))^.5

Momentum: = (hbar*c^3/(8pi G))^.5

Mass: = (hbar*c/(8pi G))^.5

If you bookmark this page, you can easily refer to it anytime in the future.
Last edited by BurtJordaan on September 14th, 2014, 2:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Minor improvement
User avatar
BurtJordaan
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2589
Joined: 17 Oct 2009
Location: South Africa
Blog: View Blog (9)
Natural ChemEMarshallFaradave liked this post


Re: The 'New Planck Units'

Postby RichardKingstone on April 8th, 2016, 6:29 pm 

Hi Burt
It seems that your definition of force is the inverse of the Einstein gravitational constant.
This may be a good thing.
The Einstein constant may be represented as ratios of force.
Your force definition is 8pi times smaller than Plank force.
This may also be a good thing.
The constant 8pi may be shown to be a ratio of thermal forces, including Plank temperature and Hawking temperature.
Regards
Rich
Last edited by RichardKingstone on April 8th, 2016, 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
RichardKingstone
Banned User
 
Posts: 21
Joined: 25 Sep 2009
Natural ChemEBurtJordaan liked this post


Re: The 'New Planck Units'

Postby Natural ChemE on April 10th, 2016, 11:13 pm 

BurtJordaan,

I'm definitely procrastinating on my work by being silly here, but...
BurtJordaan » September 14th, 2014, 11:59 am wrote:Moving on, we show the path to the other natural units, and each one should be Google-calculable so we can get the automatic metric equivalent whenever we want. Simply paste the right-most part of each equation into Google, press enter or search, and you should get an answer in normal metric units.
I thought that this point about using Google to evaluate the expressions was really neat.

I thought it could be fun to include links for Google and WolframAlpha as a convenience. And maybe toss in the in code tags? For example,

could be tabulated as
Proposed format wrote:Force:
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009


Re: The 'New Planck Units'

Postby RichardKingstone on April 11th, 2016, 1:45 pm 

Hi again Burt
If you are interested I shall be happy to post a definition of the thermal force ratio.
regards
rich
RichardKingstone
Banned User
 
Posts: 21
Joined: 25 Sep 2009


Re: The 'New Planck Units'

Postby RichardKingstone on April 11th, 2016, 5:07 pm 

Hello Burt again

Curvature is represented by the Ricci Scalar (R) in the EFE.
This scalar is a projection of the Ricci tensor.
It may be reduced to a ratio of volumes.
It may further be reduced to a ratio of areas.
If so, then;

curvature = R = A1/A2

If A1 is unit area, then R will reduce to your definition of curvature.

Regards; Rich
RichardKingstone
Banned User
 
Posts: 21
Joined: 25 Sep 2009



Return to Physics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests