Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

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Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby hyksos on January 30th, 2016, 7:35 pm 

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Re: Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby hyksos on February 7th, 2016, 3:56 pm 

Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics
Post by hyksos on January 31st, 2016, 3:35 am


I see that after a week, nobody has anything to say about this material. I guess I will bite the bullet and comment on my own post?

In the cloistered halls of academia, the Relative State Formulation of QM is reigning supreme and picking up increasing popularity among the intelligentsia. Some of the links provided above even go as far as saying that the RSF is only logical/viable/sensible interpretation out there. (!!)

The RSF is very often called "Many Worlds" or the Everett Many-worlds interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. So it is this crazy idea that there exist multiple "realities" where in each reality, some eigenstate of the Schroedinger wave is physically real. An "eigenstate" of a wave function is any situation in which a standing wave is formed. These standing waves are the only physically-valid configurations of the Schroedinger wave. For any given quantum system which has some "realistic" amount of energy inside it, the total valid eigenstates will be a discrete collection; an integer number of states. This is not a hat trick of high-level science. There are an integer number for exactly the same reason that a string on a guitar only has a finite number of vibrational modes.

So it is definitely not the case that there are an 'infinite' number of other realities co-existing with ours. The number of other realities is a finite integer. (It might be huge, but it is not infinity!). In some laboratory conditions with supercooled gases, the number of stable eigenstates may be very small, approximately 2 to 1000, (depending on the number of cesium atoms in the trap.)

This is disconcerting. It is not the case that Many-worlds is gaining popularity, because "I did LSD with my colleagues at Burning Man and we like to be rebellious and wacky and so we latch onto Many-worlds because its nutty." No , no. These stuffy down-to-earth physicists are literally telling us that Many-worlds is the only sensible alternative.

Really I'm personally still trying to stomach this situation. It makes you more wacky to disagree with Many-worlds and go with an alternative, not less!

Your thoughts ... ?
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Re: Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby TheVat on February 7th, 2016, 5:54 pm 

MWT, aka RSF, is not science. It is an untestable faith-based belief that is used to conceal the real problems and failures of modern quantum theory. It's very handy for sci-fi writers who need an alternate Spock with a goatee. Will try to stop by later in the week and add a bit more.
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Re: Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby DragonFly on February 7th, 2016, 7:54 pm 

Some BIVs may not end up in Hell and some might not be in the vat -- or God may take an average of all the BIVs for the Final Judgement, but then more BIVs form eventually…
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Re: Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby rdai on February 22nd, 2016, 2:04 pm 

Since this issue is not an issue of pure physics, but also some kind of philosophical issue, I might make a sound that would definitely not very "scientific": I would say that in order to satisfy our curiosity about the nature of quantum mechanics, it might be a time for scientists to take a look at some paranormal phenomena....at least it might tell us that the world might not just as what we see....
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Re: Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

Postby TheVat on March 5th, 2016, 10:25 am 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... s-2007-04/

An interesting approach to quantum difficulties....deals with the problem of infinite redshift in Hawking effect, and the possibility of space as a fluid. Worth reading just for the summary on acoustic black holes and what they may teach us.
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