nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Postby vivian maxine on February 21st, 2016, 8:02 am 

Is an NMRI the same as an MRI? They seem to be being called the same. And, if these tests are safe, why does the attendant stay outside the room while doing them? Lastly, how do they manage to take pictures without light? Obviously it can be done - perhaps with radio waves - but is that all? Just wondering.
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Re: nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Postby BioWizard on February 21st, 2016, 8:40 am 

Yes they should be the same.

Briefly/simply: When you put nuclei in a strong magnetic field, some of them align in a specific way, and then emit a particular signal that you can measure (magnetically) when you give them a radiowave. Hydrogen is one of the nuclei that do that strongly. This allows you to image tissues due to differences in water content (which creates constrast between tissue borders). It's an amazing noninvasive way to see through people and diagnose a very large number of disorders without having to cut patients open.

Finally, just because something is deemed safe X times, doesn't mean a medical practitioner needs to be exposed to it hundreds of thousands of times in the course of their career. Afterall, safety is not an absolute concept. It's a relative measure to amount and extent of duration.
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Re: nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Postby vivian maxine on February 21st, 2016, 11:29 am 

Thank you, BioWizard. The safety issue was one thing I thought of but also thought it might be just the machinery they use. It might not be in the same room with the patient because of metal?


As for putting nuclei in a magnetic field, I'll have to see what more I can find.


It's an amazingly awesome discovery. Heike Kamerlingh had no idea where he was taking us. I read about the levitation of the magnetic field. Just that it happens; nothing about whether the fact is of value.

Thanks again.
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Re: nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Postby BioWizard on February 21st, 2016, 11:48 am 

You can't have anything metal on/in you and get anywhere close to that powerful magnet.

Remember, repetitive excessibe exposure to almost anything can have adverse effects. Even typing on a keyboard for too long can give you problems. It's generally good practice (and common sense?) to minimize your exposure to any medical procedure you routinely administer.
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Re: nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Postby vivian maxine on February 21st, 2016, 12:18 pm 

BioWizard » February 21st, 2016, 10:48 am wrote:You can't have anything metal on/in you and get anywhere close to that powerful magnet.

Remember, repetitive excessibe exposure to almost anything can have adverse effects. Even typing on a keyboard for too long can give you problems. It's generally good practice (and common sense?) to minimize your exposure to any medical procedure you routinely administer.



I am having visions of a metal necklace and a huge magnet. :-)
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