How Fast Does Bioling Water Cool?

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How Fast Does Bioling Water Cool?

Postby Lomax on April 25th, 2017, 2:31 am 

My mochaccino sachet suggests I add water which is heated to 89 degrees celsius. Suppose I boil a litre of water in the kettle, in a room-temperature room. How long should I leave the water before adding? Can anybody tell me how I go about figuring this out (given that I don't own a thermometer)?

Cheers.
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Re: How Fast Does Bioling Water Cool?

Postby BadgerJelly on April 25th, 2017, 5:33 am 

If you pour the boiling water over a small child and catch the water, I reckon that should cool it down to about 89 degrees ;)
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Re: How Fast Does Bioling Water Cool?

Postby SciameriKen on April 25th, 2017, 2:03 pm 

Sorry my research did not start with boiling water - but maybe this helps in some way:
http://scientificameriken.com/heatretent.asp
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Re: How Fast Does Bioling Water Cool?

Postby BadgerJelly on April 26th, 2017, 3:08 am 

Boiling water freezes faster so if you put the water in the freezer this would decrease the waiting time right?

I am guessing you are boiling the water and leaving it in the kettle Lomax? If you pour out the amount of water you need into another container the temperature would drop more quickly than if you left it sitting in the kettle. Looking at Sciamerikan's work it might be enough to simply pour the water into the cup and the air would cool it by a few degrees.

I guess you'll just have to get a thermometer and test this out.

Also, the recommended temperature of water may be within a margin of error. I find it absurd to say exactly 89 degrees. I assume they mean 88-90 degrees, or they just picked a random number to make it look like they are more technical than other brands? (my cynical mind reveals itself again!)
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