Interpretations and Consensus

Discussions on classical and modern physics, quantum mechanics, particle physics, thermodynamics, general and special relativity, etc.

Re: Interpretations and Consensus

Postby ralfcis on June 4th, 2017, 12:12 am 

So Dave you're a Boolean mathematician? So you write your programs with Boolean functions such as and, or and maybe even xor? Most programmers use high level languages and don't really need to concern themselves with how that's translated into ones and zeroes. Thanks for illustrating my point though.
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Re: Interpretations and Consensus

Postby Dave_Oblad on June 4th, 2017, 4:19 am 

Hi Ralfcis,

Technically, one uses whatever method or language best serves the goal for efficiency in speed and memory requirements. When I have to create a PC program, my favorite is Visual Basic. It compiles to fast code and is very flexible. For products that my company sells (security systems) I mostly use Assembly Language. All the high level languages I've seen.. support Boolean Expressions. Some problems can't be solved without Boolean Operations.. especially at the hardware interface levels.

Some people may think a CA is restricted to Voting Logic. That's not true. Any form of Logic can be used to define the relationships between Cells. For example: A (inverted) B (inverted) C (inverted) A.. creates an oscillator. Or even: A= not A.

Bottom line.. a CA using voting logic only can be formed to do some pretty amazing things. But you open the rules to contain full Boolean Logic Expressions and now a CA starts looking like segmented language and can do far more things with much greater efficiency than a simple CA such as Conway's Life Algorithm.

Regards,
Dave :^)
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Re: Interpretations and Consensus

Postby ralfcis on June 4th, 2017, 9:55 am 

I'm fascinated by your smoke bombs. So you program using assembly language but do you also dabble in machine code or how about the hardware programming languages of VHDL or Verilog? What kind of logic do quantum computers use since there are more than 1's and 0's? Does your math expertise stop at Boolean or does it go way beyond? Don't tell me you're into 4th and 5th dimensional logic. Now that's some mathematical gravitas.
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Re: Interpretations and Consensus

Postby Dave_Oblad on June 4th, 2017, 2:53 pm 

Hi Ralfcis,

Smoke Bombs? Please explain.

Assembly language produces Machine code. Before assemblers I had to do all my programming directly into machine code. No, never used VHDL.

Quantum computers supposedly employ superposition. In essence a Qubit is still Binary but in an Unknown state until measured. The primary advantage is for use in Guessing Answers. Every programmer that has tried to solve a complex problem that exists in a multi-variable setup understands the issues of polynomial time. A brute force algorithm will eventually succeed but may take a very long time. It's impossible for a mathematical algorithm to randomly guess. The distribution of such mathematical guesses can have gaps or repetitions. Any method that proves non-redundant Guessing is no better than a Brute Force search. The hope is that Quantum Computing will be faster at Guessing a solution than traditional search algorithm computing or pseudo-random methods.

For straight forward math or logic type computing, having randomized elements doesn't help.

For elevating a 2D CA to any higher Dimension is quite simple. Interpreting the results however.. is a bitch.

I make no claim to be any type of expert in the general field of Mathematics. Like everything else, the tools taught in school fade very rapidly unless ones uses such frequently. Because of my advancing age, it is becoming increasing difficult to maintain focus on solving a problem or writing a program. My error rate is becoming a real issue. I'm retiring as soon as possible (I'm 66).

Best wishes,
Dave :^)
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