UK particle physicists celebrate first observation of the lo

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UK particle physicists celebrate first observation of the lo

Postby Event Horizon on August 29th, 2018, 10:01 am 

A fascinating article here describing the breakdown of Bosons to bottom quarks. There is a lot of information here and it will no doubt help things make sense, and may help our fundamental concept of gravity develop.

This is a quote from the article: “I believe that this measurement will improve our understanding of the mechanism of mass generation and its possible connections with cosmology and astrophysics.”

https://stfc.ukri.org/news/uk-particle- ... 27+stories

Nearly forgot. It's a CERN thing, so Lincoln has probably been working on this. Good stuff.
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Re: UK particle physicists celebrate first observation of th

Postby Braininvat on August 29th, 2018, 12:04 pm 

Lincoln has been working at FermiLab, last I heard, though he may still be involved with CERN experiments. I am currently working in a secret underground laboratory studying this tiny particle....

http://mentalfloss.com/article/51747/wh ... mithereens

I've always found it helpful to think about the Higgs primarily in terms of its field theory, rather than in terms of its particle manifestation. Maybe that's just for the visualization aspect of something that confers mass on other particles. Seeing how a point particle would do that is less intuitive than seeing the Higgs field as the "viscosity of space" which slows things down and confers mass. Like dropping a pearl into a bottle of shampoo, with the Higgs being the shampoo. Or treacle, or molasses, whatever works. Without this field, particles would fly around at the speed of light and be massless. By slowing them down to less than light speed, they acquire mass, and can clump together as fermionic matter.

The particle approach is necessary, of course, because you don't violate the conservation of energy that way. When the field manifests as a massive particle, that particle can give energy to the fermion that it encounters and make it "heavy" and slow. So you need the boson particle to balance the energy ledger.
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Re: UK particle physicists celebrate first observation of th

Postby Event Horizon on August 29th, 2018, 2:01 pm 

Yes, that makes an awful lot of sense. We really are at the coal-face here, waiting for clues, but I for one find it mentally stimulating. Getting the whole gravity complex nailed down is gonna be real asset to science and all the new stuff that helps other stuff make sense.
I accept the current model of field/particle Higgs field and bosons makes sense in terms of conservation of energy.

I also hope we find the Higgs field can be manipulated as I am running a spacecraft "Gravity Drive" thought experiment.

Quite. A smithereen should have an internationally agreed planck length!
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