How exercise may lower cancer risk

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How exercise may lower cancer risk

Postby Dave_C on February 28th, 2016, 12:19 pm 

Interesting article regarding how adrenaline might decrease cancer risk and the testing done.
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/2 ... +Main&_r=1

... The scientists then implanted melanoma skin cancer cells into the mice before providing half of them with running wheels in their cages while the other animals remained sedentary. After four weeks, far fewer of the runners had developed full-blown melanoma than the sedentary mice and those that had been diagnosed with the disease showed fewer and smaller lesions. ...

... in some of these follow-up experiments, they injected the runners with a substance that blocked the production of adrenaline and gave sedentary animals large doses of added adrenaline. ...

What they now saw was that when running mice could not produce adrenaline, they developed cancer at the same rate as the sedentary animals, while the sedentary animals that had been injected with extra adrenaline fought off their tumors better than other sitting mice.

I like that they were able to essentially eliminate the potential that the results might be skewed because some mice who want to run may be genetically different than those mice who want to be sedentary.
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Re: Too scared to live?

Postby Faradave on February 28th, 2016, 12:51 pm 

Nice experiment but we need to be sure adrenaline doesn't increase heart risk and thus, overall mortality. (Very common Beta blocker drugs, used to control heart rate and blood pressure, are essentially adrenaline blockers.)

Still, it seems clear that moderate exercise benefits both quality and quantity of life. The sooner and more routinely, the better.
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Re: How exercise may lower cancer risk

Postby Dave_C on February 28th, 2016, 1:12 pm 

Interesting... I wouldn't have thought that exercise and the resulting adrenaline might produce other negative affects. I would have thought exercise would in fact be beneficial to the heart and the circulation system in general. But as you say, that might not be the case and no doubt, it needs to be tested for.

Regardless, I'll keep running and hiking and hope for the best! :)
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Re: Too scared to live?

Postby doogles on March 1st, 2016, 6:38 am 

Faradave » Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:51 pm wrote:Nice experiment but we need to be sure adrenaline doesn't increase heart risk and thus, overall mortality. (Very common Beta blocker drugs, used to control heart rate and blood pressure, are essentially adrenaline blockers.)



I also found this to be an interesting thread. My first reaction to your post, Faradave, was that people who are regularly on beta blockers could be more at risk of problems with cancers than people not using them. I used the keywords 'Beta Blockers and Cancer Risk' in Google Scholar. The following abstracts from a few articles tends to suggest that a reduced uptake of adrenaline by beta adrenergic receptors actually reduces cancer development.

It would be interesting to see the experiment cited in Dave_C’s opening post receive some repetition with fine tuning by the use of a variety of adrenergic receptor antagonists.

http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2 ... 5422.short
Conclusion The results provide evidence in humans to support preclinical observations suggesting that inhibiting the β2-adrenergic signaling pathway can reduce breast cancer progression and mortality.

http://www.impactjournals.com/oncotarge ... %5B%5D=279
This proof-of-principle study showed beta-blocker therapy significantly reduces distant metastases, cancer recurrence, and cancer-specific mortality in breast cancer patients suggesting a novel role for beta-blocker therapy.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/15107693
CONCLUSION: In this cohort, the beta-blocker treatments appeared to decrease the cancer risk significantly. However, this result should be considered with caution; further work is needed, as some sources of bias associated with this type of epidemiological study cannot be totally excluded.
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