re Aducanumab

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re Aducanumab

Postby vivian maxine on September 1st, 2016, 11:30 am 

This replying article about the news of Aducanumab's "hopes"? "promises"? of fighting plaque in developing alzheimers seems to me to be more valuable than the original news article. So:

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/bi ... not-market
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Re: re Aducanumab

Postby Braininvat on September 1st, 2016, 11:47 am 

The adverse effects that accompany high doses (i.e. effective doses) are troubling and deserve serious study before people get all moist about this. But if they can find a middle ground, a Goldilocks Zone of dosage, where AE's are minimized and you have a significant reduction in amyloid plaque growth that could give someone several good years of cognitive life, then it might be quite a drug. After all, Alzheimer's strikes mainly those at an age where an extra, say, 5 years, could mean good cognitive function until they die of other causes natural to old age.
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Re: re Aducanumab

Postby vivian maxine on September 1st, 2016, 12:05 pm 

Braininvat » September 1st, 2016, 10:47 am wrote:The adverse effects that accompany high doses (i.e. effective doses) are troubling and deserve serious study before people get all moist about this. But if they can find a middle ground, a Goldilocks Zone of dosage, where AE's are minimized and you have a significant reduction in amyloid plaque growth that could give someone several good years of cognitive life, then it might be quite a drug. After all, Alzheimer's strikes mainly those at an age where an extra, say, 5 years, could mean good cognitive function until they die of other causes natural to old age.


Exactly. There are many of those Science Daily reports that it would be good to see follow-ups on. It keeps us from getting all excited far too soon. That doesn't, of course, mean we give up on it. We just don't expect it "yesterday". Or - in other cases - adopt new practices that have not even been confirmed. Doctors can tell us how many patients they get coming in and demanding a new medicine because they saw it on the idiot box last night.

Thank you for explaining about aducanumab more clearly than I could Biv.
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Re: re Aducanumab

Postby neuro on September 5th, 2016, 1:20 pm 

Just a side note:

Although there is some consensus that amyloid plaques do have a pathogenetic role (i.e. they favor the progress of the disease), it is not so clear whether avoiding the deposition of amyloid (or digesting existing plaques) will actually improve to a significant extent the cognitive situation and/or modify the course of the disease. (Some data from experimental models suggest this to be the case, but notice that the mouse experimental model is an animal in which the course of a disease that typically develops after >60 years of life in humans has been mimicked in such a way that it develops in months!!)

The other side of the coin is that the extent of amyloid deposition in the brain is not the sole indicator of the cognitive deterioration: bilingual people with the same extent of amyloid deposition as mono-lingual ones typically have lower cognitive impairment, and this generally holds for people with higher level of education / everyday mental exercise.

So, while waiting for new antibodies against A-beta, keep training your brain: that's the most effective therapy.
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Re: re Aducanumab

Postby vivian maxine on September 5th, 2016, 1:54 pm 

neuro wrote:The other side of the coin is that the extent of amyloid deposition in the brain is not the sole indicator of the cognitive deterioration: bilingual people with the same extent of amyloid deposition as mono-lingual ones typically have lower cognitive impairment, and this generally holds for people with higher level of education / everyday mental exercise.


Meaning we really do exercise our brains and our actions do have an effect/influence on them. It seems hard to believe, really. It isn't like "eat your broccoli; it's good for you". It's much more abstract. Yet it's been shown to work.

It seems to me to mean something else, also. Our brains do not totally control us. We, in part, control our brains by how we "feed" them. "Use it or lose it."

Thank you, Neuro and Biv for the enrichment of the idea.
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