We absolutely cannot win (ecofriendly diets?)

Discussions on the interactions between components of the environment and their effects on all types of organisms.

Re: We absolutely cannot win (ecofriendly diets?)

Postby TheVat on May 9th, 2019, 1:03 pm 

What makes all this so frustrating is that regulating the fishing industry is both cheap and easy. If commercial fishing were excluded from large areas of the sea, the total catch would be likely, paradoxically, to rise, due to what biologists call the spillover effect. Fish and shellfish breed and grow to large sizes in the reserves, then spill over into surrounding waters. Where seas have been protected in other parts of the world, catches have grown dramatically. As a paper in the journal PLOS Biology shows, even if fishing was banned across the entire high seas – as it should be – the world’s fish catch would rise, as the growing populations would migrate into national waters....


https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... government

I have pledged to stop eating fish, in light of the current situation. Will report back in a year or two on how my osteoarthritis is doing after a decreased intake in the most absorbable forms of Omega-3 fatty acids. (plant-based om-3s, like flax and walnut oil have good amounts of om-3, but of a less absorbable form that is often degraded in transit, and during the refining process, due to their ease of oxidation) I was only eating one serving a week, so maybe not a big deal, but I'm also quitting products that have fish oil as a healthy additive, like some protein bars. (note: all results will be anecdotal, and scientifically worthless)
User avatar
TheVat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 7108
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: We absolutely cannot win (ecofriendly diets?)

Postby Serpent on May 9th, 2019, 4:18 pm 

Interesting. We don't eat fish - and I've never particularly liked it, so that wasn't a sacrifice.

You don't want it now, anyway; all the fish are full of plastic waste. Ugh!

For you Omega 3, here are some suggestions to get enough without the degradation involved in processing: eat the foods directly, and in the optimal combinations.
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-plant-sources-of-omega-3s
I was delighted by the Brussel sprouts - love them as salad, cooked, roasted or fried

I make a laxative according to the internist's recommendation:
1 part grated or mashed apple
1 part bran
1 part prune juice (sometimes more, for a sloppier texture)
1/2 part ground flax seed
big dash of cinnamon or pumpkin spice mix (cinnamon, nutmeg, clove, mace)
mix thoroughly (just chuck everything in the food processor)
keep in top shelf of fridge and eat like pudding, as needed.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3560
Joined: 24 Dec 2011
TheVat liked this post


Re: We absolutely cannot win (ecofriendly diets?)

Postby TheVat on May 10th, 2019, 9:14 am 

Thanks for the tips - the algal oil looks like a good source of the DHA/EPA form. As for Brussels sprouts, I've heard there's a genetic aspect of liking them (which I do, too) that has to do with liking somewhat bitter pungent flavors. My spouse can't eat them, and I know they hit her palate differently.
Vive la salmon!
User avatar
TheVat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 7108
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: We absolutely cannot win (ecofriendly diets?)

Postby Serpent on May 10th, 2019, 10:39 am 

Brassicas can be as tricky to digest as legumes.
It's also a matter of time. I never liked Brussel sprouts until about age 60, when I threw some into mixed veg roast ...(...Oh, to make an outdoor fire!.... but it's cold and wet...)... and tasted them again after many years.
I hated celery for half my life; now it's one of my favourite juice and soup ingredients. Olives are for grownups; I was 25 before I discovered what people in the movies liked about them. ....(can't have a dirty Martini anymore, either....bummer...)...
And sometimes a matter of how it's is cooked. The Anglo-American tradition with vegetables is what puts off most of their children. When I first came to Canada, I couldn't understand why spinach was supposed to be bad. Then I had some a classmate's house. Oh. Aha.
But I'm never tasting maggot-sausage. https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/humans-will-eat-maggot-sausages-as-a-meat-alternative-scientists/
Nice to see the fast food industry catching up to meatless burgers.
We're not impressed with Wendy's; A&W's has been just okay for years; will check out Burger King's next.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3560
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Previous

Return to Environmental Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest