A newer old snowball earth theory

Discussions on the interactions between components of the environment and their effects on all types of organisms.

A newer old snowball earth theory

Postby zetreque on January 3rd, 2019, 1:23 pm 

Around the world, miles of rock are missing. Could ‘Snowball Earth’ be the culprit?
By Julia Rosen
Jan 03, 2019
https://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-snowball-earth-geology-20190103-story.html

This is a really cool geological mystery being explored.
I'm familiar with the weathering reducing CO2 and cooling the Earth theory.
I'm a little bit confused how a "snowball" or frozen Earth would increase erosion any more than a hot greenhouse earth that has lots of rain. This is obviously a very complex story and oversimplifying it to the same conditions across the whole surface seems wrong.
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Re: A newer old snowball earth theory

Postby TheVat on January 3rd, 2019, 4:46 pm 

Movement of glaciers at wide range of latitude scours the surface of snowball Earth. Whereas...

Moist greenhouse Earth has topsoil held in place by very abundant foliage.
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Re: A newer old snowball earth theory

Postby zetreque on January 3rd, 2019, 8:44 pm 

I suppose it's possible but with a world with lots of precipitation you still see massive ecological succession and biological activity that breaks apart rock and washes amazing amounts of sediments to the ocean. Also the hotter earth has more extreme weather events full of erosion as well.
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Re: A newer old snowball earth theory

Postby PaulN on January 3rd, 2019, 9:16 pm 

Tough call. But glacial movements do seem to be intensely erosive.
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