The Inner Life of the Cell: Biovisions Video/Explanations

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The Inner Life of the Cell: Biovisions Video/Explanations

Postby BioWizard on September 4th, 2006, 4:29 pm 

This is BioVisions' video depicting various processes inside a cell as it translocates across a capillary. I wanted everyone to be able to enjoy this video as much as I did, so I made captions for each scene and I explained briefly what it's about. If you have any comments, questions, corrections, etc, please feel free to post them here.



Scene by scene explanation:

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A white blood cell rolls across the inner wall of a blood capillary, as its receptors transiently interact with proteins on the surface of the capillary epithelial cells. These are called intercellular adhesion molecules, or ICAMs.


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At one point, the cell reaches a specific type of membrane protein (selectins) which its receptors bind more tightly, causing it to dock at that location. It's due to stronger interactions with adhesion proteins on both cells. These proteins are expressed at that site to recruit the white blood cell to a nearby possibly inflammed location, perhaps just behind the wall of the capillary. The inflammation causes the capillary cells to express these receptors to recruit the white blood cells from the blood and into the site.


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This transduces a signal through the membrane via the activated receptors


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This signal is carried in the form of second messengers that promote actin polymerization in the direction of the activated receptors.


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This also causes the breakdown of actin filaments in the direction opposite the activated receptors. This causes a net push forward for the cell in the direction of the activated receptors


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The signal also causes tubulin to polymerize forward


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And here's tubulin breaking down in the back of the cell, again contributing to the forward push


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Here is a small motor protein dragging a vacuole towards the contact scene on the newly polymerized tubulin tubule


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A signal is also transduced to the nucleus, in the form of transcription factors which induce mRNA expression. You see here mRNAs leaving the nucleus through pores in the nuclear membrane, aided by a shuttle protein


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The large and small subunits of the ribosome assemble on the mRNA and initiate translation. You can see a peptide chain emerging from the other side of the large subunit.


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Vacuoles containing soluble or membrane bound proteins bud from the endoplasmic reticulum and migrate towards Golgi apparatus.


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After processing, the blobs continue towards the membrane at the point of contact, and they merge with the plasma membrane releasing their soluble proteins into the intercellular space. The membrane bound ones remain attached to the surface and now act as receptors or docking points.


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These receptors attach to other receptors on the epithelial cell, and the soluble proteins stimulate the epithelial cells to produce more receptors to strengthen the contacts.


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That along with the forward polymerizing actin and tubulin cause the white blood cell to flaten out, and then attach to the receptors being expressed infront of it, and guides it through the capillary membrane, as it squeezes itself out the other end, probably to a site of inflammation.


Big thanks to BioVisions and Harvard University for creating this magnificent piece of work.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Kathryn on September 4th, 2006, 7:41 pm 

Aha, got it working..
tubulin... Very cool video ! :)
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby genemachine on September 5th, 2006, 4:15 pm 

Thanks for the explaination bio, it makes a lot more sense now. I hope they get round to animating the rest of our cellular processes.

Thanks for giving me credit for having found this animation ;)

If anyone is interested, I found it on this great Blog
http://www.gnxp.com/
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BioWizard on September 8th, 2006, 2:13 am 

"In some instances, that meant sacrificing literal accuracy for visual effect. What we did in some cases, with the full support of the Harvard team, was subtly change the way things work," Liebler says. "The reality is that all that stuff that's going on in each cell is so tightly packed together that if we were to put every detail into every shot, you wouldn't be able to see the forest for the trees or know what you were even looking at. One of the most common things we did, then, was to strip it apart and add space where there isn't really that much space."

There isn't a soundtrack to explain what you are seeing and the animation sequences jump too much for teaching. However, if you know some microbiology you can recognize much of what is being shown.


It's worth meantioning that all water molecules were left out of the simulation and replaced by a blue haze, otherwise nothing would have been apparent to us.

Thanks for attracting our attention to yet another amazing video genemachine.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby tess on September 11th, 2006, 4:03 pm 

Whhhhhaw :idea:
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby lucretiaX on September 11th, 2006, 4:51 pm 

Beautiful. Thanks for this post Bio. For me, this is as good as fractal art!
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby graemhoek on September 12th, 2006, 12:37 am 

Nice video. I like your screen shots.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby dhruvg on September 15th, 2006, 7:58 am 

hey! Good job! i liked these pics and the video. Thanks for giving me the information
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Tranquil on September 20th, 2006, 2:47 pm 

Realy nice post Bio, txh for sharing . . .
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Soar on September 28th, 2006, 10:21 pm 

Amzing movie, excellent explanation.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BorisOfTerreHaute on September 29th, 2006, 2:02 pm 

WOW! I've got goose bumps that just won't go away. Man that was awesome.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Patricia on October 7th, 2006, 9:15 pm 

This is great video, I enjoyed a lot, I like to see it again and again, thank you so much :)
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby noora on October 25th, 2006, 12:56 pm 

soooooo beautiful.....

thank u for sharing with us the video
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Kathryn on October 25th, 2006, 7:45 pm 

Heh, so I sent the link to this video to the professor who taught me cell biology in 2nd year univeristy.
Apparently he showed it to his class this week !
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Seraph524 on November 4th, 2006, 12:06 am 

Did anybody else notice the error? The signaling peptide that translocates the ribosome to the rER is missing from that one scene...it shows the ribosome landing, THEN it initiates translation.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BioWizard on November 4th, 2006, 12:39 am 

Sera,

Good observation, I did think about it the first time I watched the video. However, it is possible that the peptide was emerging at the opposite side of the ribosome, and it's is rather too short to see it from that angle. Once the signal sequence is produced, it is recognized and bound by SRP (signal receptor particle), and protein synthesis is paused temporarily (Halic M et al, 2004). The SRP then takes the ribosome and inserts the nascent peptide through the membrane translocon, and dissociates in a GTP dependent manner (Connolly T and Gilmore R., 1989).

So translation had already initiated at that point, and it was paused at "elongation", meanwhile the protein is translocated and the SRP dissociates. My only remaining concern however is that we don't see an SRP coming off once translation (elongation) is resumed.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Seraph524 on November 4th, 2006, 1:13 pm 

Hey, your right, we don't see the signal peptide being cleaved, but oh well.

By the way, what is that grayish looking thing during that scene of translation? You see proteins floating to a huge oblong looking blob of matter.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BioWizard on November 4th, 2006, 1:51 pm 

I suppose the SP isn't always cleaved off. What I wanted to see was the SRP dissociating from the ribosome upon docking.

I think what you're referring to is a mitochondrion.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Seraph524 on November 4th, 2006, 2:20 pm 

Ah, I blame all textbooks showing the stereotypical RED mitochondria.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby hei83 on November 20th, 2006, 4:17 pm 

Hi i've just seen the video. Its great! The animation was really good. But mind you if you really want to record live videos of live specimens under the microscope you can have it by simply connect your scope to USB camera and laptop. I just got a scope from the online microscope store truevisionmicroscopes.com. They offer wide selection of microscopes and microscopy accessories.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Zorak on November 24th, 2006, 7:33 am 

That video has given me a deeper interest into biology. I have watched it before, but its like each time I watch it again I learn something new. Amazing.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby AZPaul3 on November 24th, 2006, 1:18 pm 

It took me a while to get all the pieces parts together to view this video. Had to convince the system admin of my "need."

The video is very impressive. I had a vague understanding of what was happening. With the screen shots and explanation Bio provided I now have a somewhat less vague understanding.

I was especially taken with that transport protein with its size 15s clodding along the tubule dragging that monster vacuole with it. It looked "alive" in its own right. How do it do this? Does anyone know the chemical mechanisms behind this "walking" motion? Was this "artistic license" or does this protein truly clod along (much faster than the video showed, I'm sure) with two big "feet" down the tubule road?

Very well done. Thanx all.

-P
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby graemhoek on November 27th, 2006, 12:54 pm 

We can't "see" any of the components of the cell the way the video depicts them. The highest resolution microscopy suggests these sorts of molecular motors in combinaiton with our best structural data. Some artistic license is taken, but with the most accuracy that we can ascribe given the nature of the data provided.

Metaphorically, you can think of each of the parts as being a component of a car: some are structural, some are mechanical, but none of them individually constitute a car.

"Life" is a sticky subject indeed. What constitutes a "living organism" has grown fuzzier and fuzzier as our understanding of the individual components of what makes up reproducing elements that we refer to as 'living' has increased. There are a number of posts regarding this topic in SCF. I'm sure BioWizard can guide you to them more accurately than I, but searching for them yourself might illuminate you better than a proverbial 'yellow brick road'.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby Jasmine on December 7th, 2006, 1:48 pm 

This is beautiful...
My teacher would be thrilled to see this.
Thank you.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby a_rat on December 28th, 2006, 5:06 pm 

Ok sure, there may be the odd omission, (e.g. the afore mentioned SEP), But hey I’m willing to forgive them that in light of how much they managed to pack into the clip.
AWESOME
Thanks for posting that Biowizard it shows the processes just as I have envisioned them,
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Text of the inner life of a cell

Postby olgaka on February 5th, 2007, 12:31 pm 

Dear friends,
Hi. I am Olga from Farsala, Greece.
I like your forum very much. I also love "the inner life of a cell".
There is an eight- minute animation with narration at
http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/anim_ ... fe_hi.html

I hear the narration but it is difficult for me to understand it fully if I don't see it written, too.
Is it possible to find the text?
Bye for now
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BioWizard on February 5th, 2007, 2:09 pm 

Hey Olga and welcome to the forums. I didn't know of the narration before, so I'll listen to it when I get back home. I doubt however that I'm going to have the time to type it out, but I will be glad to answer any specifc questions you might have about any particular detail in the movie.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby cyberpostdoc on February 16th, 2007, 12:05 am 

wow, that's beautiful!!

Thanks for sharing.
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby olgaka on February 16th, 2007, 5:06 am 

Hi. What is there among the cells?
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Inside the Cell - Harvard BioVisions Video - Just beautiful

Postby BioWizard on April 24th, 2007, 12:24 pm 

olgaka wrote:Hi. What is there among the cells?


Where do you mean?
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