Lion presentation

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Lion presentation

Postby caters on August 1st, 2015, 11:24 am 

Here is my presentation about the lion life cycle: https://prezi.com/uwvap0ljxdso/lion-life-cycle/ What do you think? Am I missing anything?

Do you think I should do one on cheetahs, 1 on leopards, 1 on jaguars, and 1 on tigers as well?
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Serpent on August 1st, 2015, 4:48 pm 

Question: Who is the target audience?

Comments:

The pictures are good; the format is aesthetically pleasing.
It's straightforward, clear and succinct. Possibly a little too succinct: more information wouldn't hurt:

Context in intro - what are they, where, how and how long do they live?
You left out
- what happens to the female cubs from 2 years to maturity
- what normally constitutes a pride
- old age and death
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Watson on August 1st, 2015, 6:40 pm 

Death comes from old age, unless the lion is bated by a dead animal dragged behind a truck, shot with an arrow by a dentist from Minnesota, and stalked until it is to weak to continue, at which point it is slaughtered for the trophy parts to adorn the dentists home.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Braininvat on August 1st, 2015, 6:56 pm 

A lot of folks are pretty angry about Cecil...now if they could just summon that same level of outrage whenever an unarmed African-American human is gunned down by a cop for the heinous crime of running away.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby caters on August 1st, 2015, 7:50 pm 

Okay I have added a slide about gestation and a few slides about lionesses including a video Born Predator which is a documentary of a nomadic lioness Miata and her cub Moja. The lioness in a pride slide talks about the composition of a lion pride and what the lionesses do in a pride. I have also edited the mating one to include that lionesses are not seasonal when it comes to whether or not they are in heat.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Serpent on August 1st, 2015, 9:06 pm 

Loading time is a bit slow for me now - i'll look later.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Marshall on August 2nd, 2015, 1:55 am 

caters » Sat Aug 01, 2015 4:50 pm wrote:Okay I have added a slide about gestation and a few slides about lionesses including a video Born Predator which is a documentary of a nomadic lioness Miata and her cub Moja. The lioness in a pride slide talks about the composition of a lion pride and what the lionesses do in a pride. I have also edited the mating one to include that lionesses are not seasonal when it comes to whether or not they are in heat.


I watched the documentary all the way through.
You had one slide about young females being tested to see if they were up to the standards of the pride and if not (like Miata, or Nyata...) they were driven out, having to live a difficult marginalized life as outcasts. cubs likely to starve etc. What is the evolutionary advantage of this behavior?
I didn't understand your slide about the testing.

I don't always hear too well. I would have spelled the cub's name Moshe which is hebrew or arabic for Moses.
Moses was abandoned as a cub, and left in a basket in the tall grass, and found and adopted. Is that right? I forget the details of the story.

Good documentary, I think. Strange social structure---lions. Females do the hunting. Young males are driven out and form coalitions and eventually try to invade and take over an old male's pride. Or so I gather from watching the documentary. It's nice the females nurse each other's cubs---cooperate. Life very hard for the outcasts. nomadic cubs don't get a good education because they don't have a lot of other cubs to play with.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby caters on August 2nd, 2015, 2:09 am 

Yeah so they have to learn everything from their mothers which can take up to 4 years.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby caters on August 2nd, 2015, 1:46 pm 

The evolutionary advantage of this testing to see if it can handle the action of the pride is that ones that pass the test can make the existing pride stronger and more likely to take down large prey such as elephants. The ones that don't pass the test can form a pride of their own if the males that mate with them decide to stay and patrol the territory. But there is always the possibility that the males won't stay with the females because of being killed by other lions while on patrol or in other situations. This means that the cubs are likely to starve.

Sometimes a nomadic lioness will try to join up with her natal pride. However if she has cubs like Miata in the documentary it isn't likely that the male lions of her natal pride will accept this nomadic lioness
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Marshall on August 2nd, 2015, 2:52 pm 

How would you describe the testing, to see if she can handle the action of the pride?
would it involve a situation in which they collectively try to take down large prey and the other females are watching out of the corner of their eye to see if she is up to their standards of courage/aggressiveness/speed or whatever?
or would the testing happen in "play" activities like mock adversarial bouts.
I'm trying to imagine.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Serpent on August 3rd, 2015, 2:23 pm 

Yes, it's more complete now.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Marshall on August 3rd, 2015, 2:41 pm 

Serpent » Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:23 am wrote:Yes, it's more complete now.

Yes what? please. I just reviewed the presentation and it did not say anything more about what "testing" entails than it did before. All the text said was something like tested to see if she can "handle the action of the pride".

Maybe there is some illustration of this testing in one of the videos. I see there are several videos and I only watched one of them: the one about Moshe and his mother Nyata (or Miata, listening I can't tell which it is)

Must say I do like this presentation. It seems to be researched (although it does not give links to text sources). And it's quite interesting!
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Serpent on August 3rd, 2015, 5:38 pm 

Yes what? please. I just reviewed the presentation and it did not say anything more about what "testing" entails than it did before. All the text said was something like tested to see if she can "handle the action of the pride".

Sorry, Marshall. My response wasn't to your question. I first saw the presentation before the bit about young lionesses and testing was included at all, when it went straight from cubs to young males in exile. I still don't know whether it's complete enough, but I have no context to judge by; don't know how comprehensive it should be. We may be asking too much from a life cycle presentation.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Paralith on August 3rd, 2015, 6:50 pm 

caters, please provide a source for the young adult females being "tested". A quick review of the literature on lion cooperation suggests that it is not uncommon for some lionesses to lag behind and not participate in hunts or barely contribute to the actual kill (link, link), especially when the prey involved is not that hard for one or a few lions to catch. I couldn't find any studies that showed that the repeated lagging of one particular lioness resulted in any form of punishment by the other members of the pride. This may be because several studies suggest that the benefit lions get from group living is not actually about hunting, but about defense of good hunting territory and of the cubs (link, link).

But even so, females that were known to consistently drag their heels when it came to territorial disputes were not actively punished by the others either (link). If anything, it seems that females will tolerate lazy cheaters if that's what it takes to maintain enough females in a group for sufficient defense - lioness X may not actively get into fights like the others, but at least she's still there should worst come to worst, a last line of defense for the cubs, perhaps. Better to carry her lazy bum and at least have her there rather than go to the trouble of driving her away. In fact, that may even drive her into a competitor's pride, which is the opposite of what the females would want.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby someguy1 on August 4th, 2015, 11:55 am 

Braininvat » August 1st, 2015, 4:56 pm wrote:A lot of folks are pretty angry about Cecil...now if they could just summon that same level of outrage whenever an unarmed African-American human is gunned down by a cop for the heinous crime of running away.


Me too.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Watson on August 5th, 2015, 3:54 pm 

Image
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Braininvat on August 6th, 2015, 11:33 pm 

Miaow.

Anyone know a surefire way to de-flea a cat? This is for my son's cat, while we visit, and several methods are in play, including flea-comb with lemon oil, topical ointment, bowls of soapy water with an attractant light (fleas jump in and drown as the light lures them), relentless vacuuming of key areas, quarantine to one room with higher control of flea vectors, and so on. Is there a "nuclear option" -- something that really wipes fleas out? I've heard good things about diatomaceous earth, worked into fur and bedding, which reportedly lacerates the exoskeleton and causes a flea to dehydrate and die. There is some reluctance to use harsh chemicals, but I think we're open to botanicals. Any ideas, anecdotes, or overall strategic approaches welcome.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby caters on August 7th, 2015, 12:12 am 

I have been able to get fleas and flea eggs off of my dog by closely inspecting her and then grabbing the fleas and flea eggs. The fleas died in the process. Fleas were often on her belly or legs and flea eggs were often on her ears.

If your cat is very tolerant of you petting his belly you might be able to do it the same way.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Braininvat on August 7th, 2015, 9:34 am 

Thanks, cat. Flea combs sort of accomplish that, especially if the tines are dipped in eucalyptus or lemon oil - these oils keep them from jumping off the comb (they are stunned, briefly) as it emerges from the fur. Lavender and cedar oil also work - whichever your pet doesn't mind. Simple visual inspection doesn't work with cats that have denser fur than dogs, which is common. Once you have the flea on a comb, or in hand, you pop them into soapy water - the soap is a surfactant, which allows water to enter insect breathing holes more rapidly and drown them. As for cat tolerance, we are lucky.... Vlad is very easy going about combing almost anywhere.
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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Marshall on August 7th, 2015, 10:21 am 

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Re: Lion presentation

Postby Braininvat on August 7th, 2015, 3:52 pm 

He's not much of an impaler, as cats go. Heh. It's actually short for Vladislav...and I'm not sure anyone has the full story of that name choice.
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