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Heritability

PostPosted: November 11th, 2017, 2:18 am
by BadgerJelly
What is the best definition of "heritability" you can express in the most simple way?

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 7:29 am
by BioWizard
Vertical acquisition of traits or attributes from biological ancestors.

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 8:57 am
by BadgerJelly
BioWizard » November 12th, 2017, 7:29 pm wrote:Vertical acquisition of traits or attributes from biological ancestors.


And a way that makes sense too! ;) ??

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 9:02 am
by BioWizard
BadgerJelly » 12 Nov 2017 07:57 am wrote:
BioWizard » November 12th, 2017, 7:29 pm wrote:Vertical acquisition of traits or attributes from biological ancestors.


And a way that makes sense too! ;) ??


Let me know which part didn't make sense and I'll explain it.

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 9:25 am
by BadgerJelly
No idea what you mean by "vertical"?

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 9:40 am
by BioWizard
Oh. It just means ancestors who are directly in your reproductive line. Anyone without whom you wouldn't be born. Those can be determined by tracing your pedigree upwards (hence vertical). Your most immediate ones are your mom and dad. Then your grandparents. Then your great grandparents and so on.

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 10:54 am
by BadgerJelly
I just find it an extraordinary how easily these statistics can be misrepresented!

That heritability can be reduced to practically 0% simply by widening the "environmental" factors, and the by working under set conditions (as experiments are usually set up) the heritability can be given to be nearing 100%

I have seen certain "genes" mentioned as being this or that % heritability, and only now am I starting to appreciate how meaningless select pieces of data can be in this regard.

Re: Heritability

PostPosted: November 12th, 2017, 12:43 pm
by BioWizard
Statistics? Not sure when that came into the discussion. Are you talking about what % of a phenotype is genetically encoded? Yeah, somewhere between 0 (probably never zero because the space of possibilite phenotypes is set by your genome) and 100%, depending on the phenotype.