is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

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is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby global38 on January 28th, 2018, 10:47 pm 

Cancer undergoes an evolutionary process during its progression. Initially they arise from foci of dysplasia in situ disease. Some of these indolent epithelial cells, will eventually “collect” additional aberrations over time. Among these cells, the ones with capability to adapt and are compatible within the local microenvironment will survive and proliferate, constantly adding novel altered biological properties, leading to more aggressive tumors. Scientists have long tried to identify driver events in cancer progression. Some driver mutations have been extensively studied, but a universal model has not emerged. One reason for this could be the huge heterogeneity among different clones in a single patient, as well as the fact every patient has unique tumor hallmarks. Apart from this, not all genetic aberrations cause phenotypic alterations, or confer survival advantage, but are neutral. Moreover, epigenetic and metabolic events have been found to independently affect the fate of tumor cells.
Roughly the same principles apply in bacterial adaptation, speciation, evolution, etc. Various changes are observed but at the end of the end they all share something in common. If the newly introduced chemical reaction, chemical pathway, system etc, leads to increased survival of the whole system, then it will be selected, no matter what the cause of this change was. So we only have chemical changes that cause a favorable result and chemical changes that cause unfavorable results for the cell….So evolution can be reduced down to evolution and selection of the fittest chemical reaction systems.
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby Biosapien on March 14th, 2018, 1:19 am 

When all the cells in our body has been programmed to cell death, what kind of chemical reaction or pathway that guides the cell to immortality.
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby Event Horizon on March 14th, 2018, 2:58 am 

What I dont understand is why don't sharks get cancer? What's protecting their cells from becoming Cancerous? Could it be a biological thing, their DNA is more stable, or could it be an oil or chemical that maintain a stable cell state?
In human DNA telomeres can be detached allowing the DNA to unravel, but can be re-capped by consuming nut oils.
Faulty genes and DNA damage are known to cause cancer, but we have so many I don't know how one might go about fixing them all even with gene therapies. Basically, we all have cancer in us, but it seems like environmental conditions diet and lifestyle can trigger it. For some folks, it seems to be blind luck.
It's a hellish complicated problem, there are over 200 cancers I think, There are probably dozens of triggers with different pathways, many of which are known, but not all by any means.
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby Biosapien on March 15th, 2018, 11:06 pm 

It seems like aetiology of the disease also follow the Heisenberg's principle of uncertainty or the theory of probability.
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby Event Horizon on March 16th, 2018, 1:20 am 

Hmm. It's possible that probability theory may work. I smoke, that increases my probability of getting various but mainly lung cancer. I think some number-crunching could define a probability range. On the other hand I still might not get cancer. I'm not very worried about cancer though, everybody has to die of something. My mental health is more dangerous than cancer anyway I think. Last time I got really unwell, I was in hospital for 10 1/2 months. Risk is relative I guess. The joys of being bipolar and BPD.
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby global38 on March 18th, 2018, 3:02 pm 

Sharks do get cancer. Cancer is about natural selection. If a group of cells happen to become resistant to cell death they prevail. Among them, the ones that can live in a new environment will prevail in that new environment and create metastases, and so on...
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby Event Horizon on March 18th, 2018, 4:16 pm 

I'm sorry if I was wrong about sharks and cancer. I think a (Greenland) shark was found to be around 400 years old, and ages of many others was in excess of 2oo years if I recall. That's a long time to maintain healthy DNA for and one might wonder, What are their cells doing differently? Why aren' they mutating like one might expect at such an age? If we knew this, we would maybe look at adapting it to protect our own DNA as well. Healthier people living to their natural age might be less of a burden on the state too I would imagine, saving money.
It would be amazing if you could inoculate against DNA damage.

About the shark... https://inhabitat.com/512-year-old-gree ... -on-earth/
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby BioWizard on March 28th, 2018, 4:39 pm 

Developing cancer isn't just a molecular or cellular process. It's also a systems-level process. The immune system, forever, can attack and stop a cancer from developing. So just looking inside the cancer cell isn't enough to predict what the the trigger or the outcome of the cancer diagnosis is going to be. Frankly, the way many cancer biologists have thought about cancer for a very long time is a bit naive/too simplistic. Of noteworthy mention is the assumption that cancer behavior can be fully reduced to the genomic information of the cancer cells. People are starting to come around, but a lot of that stupidity still pervades the field, and people are always trying to find the next magical concept to reduce it all to - first the genome, then the transcriptome, then the epigenome, now back to the metabolome. It's a systems process and it involves the interplay between multiple processing including the ageing rate/life span of the organism (which is also a function of how the stem cells are programmed to behave - not just BS theories about accumulating oxidative damage and what not), immune function, and mutation rate (yes, this is only one component of the full recipe).
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Re: is life about the survival of fittest chemistry?

Postby global38 on April 3rd, 2018, 2:05 am 

I agree!! They begin to understand that reducing everything to one factor is not how things work. However, the irony is that they should continue reducing because patients will only tolerate 1 or 2 agents, thus prioritizing targets is critical. How can someone target a system with so many crosstalks?? In some tumors as far as i know, mutations are super critical such as in lung cancer, whereas in others they are not so important. An example is hormone sensitive breast cancer where hormone receptor activation is more important than the genotype.
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