What's your favorite reaction?

Discussions on general chemistry and chemical engineering, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, etc.

What's your favorite reaction?

Postby ElectraQT on April 22nd, 2014, 10:24 pm 

For me it's Diels Alder condensation.

Image

I like the idea of the double bonds flipping around to form a ring from two linear molecules.

What's yours?
User avatar
ElectraQT
Member
 
Posts: 51
Joined: 14 Apr 2014


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Natural ChemE on May 3rd, 2014, 9:28 pm 

ElectraQT,

I like surface-catalyzed reactions. I don't know why exactly, just that it's neat having kinetics happen on a 2-D plane as opposed to a 3-D volume.

Beyond that anything that's just neat to look at. For example, some of the biochemical reactions in cells with crazy long self-regulating mechanisms are neat to look at, even if I hated memorizing them back in school.
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009
BioWizardElectraQT liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on May 4th, 2014, 12:48 am 

I found this reaction really interesting today.


Liquid Electrons
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)
ElectraQT liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby ElectraQT on May 4th, 2014, 9:18 pm 

Natural ChemE wrote:ElectraQT,

I like surface-catalyzed reactions. I don't know why exactly, just that it's neat having kinetics happen on a 2-D plane as opposed to a 3-D volume.


Hey that's a neat reaction context I hadn't thought of!!! I remember doing the kinetics for solution state. Wonder how this differs? You can't use concentrations, and you have one less degree of freedom to work with. Hmmmm...... interesting!

Beyond that anything that's just neat to look at. For example, some of the biochemical reactions in cells with crazy long self-regulating mechanisms are neat to look at, even if I hated memorizing them back in school.


When you say look at, you mean the reactions themselves? Or animations?
User avatar
ElectraQT
Member
 
Posts: 51
Joined: 14 Apr 2014


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby ElectraQT on May 4th, 2014, 9:31 pm 

zetreque wrote:I found this reaction really interesting today.

Liquid Electrons


That was fun to watch!!! I didn't know about this reaction........ I'm trying to envision solvated electrons the same way we think about solvated protons..... bouncing around between water molecules. I'm just not sure exactly how they're being solvated though???? I don't think they can hydrogen bond.... Bouncing through vacant molecular orbitals????
User avatar
ElectraQT
Member
 
Posts: 51
Joined: 14 Apr 2014


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Hendrick Laursen on May 5th, 2014, 4:51 am 

Termite
:)
User avatar
Hendrick Laursen
Member
 
Posts: 569
Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Location: God's Green Earth
Blog: View Blog (6)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on May 7th, 2014, 2:15 am 

I like reactions that have to do with burning elements/compounds, flame tests, and then doing spectroscopy. What kind of reactions would you call those?
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby BioWizard on May 7th, 2014, 7:59 am 

zetreque » 07 May 2014 02:15 am wrote:I like reactions that have to do with burning elements/compounds, flame tests, and then doing spectroscopy. What kind of reactions would you call those?


Flame ionization/mass spectrometry?
User avatar
BioWizard
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 12762
Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Location: United States
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Hendrick Laursen on May 7th, 2014, 9:08 am 

Although it's not a single reaction, but I really appreciate Solvay process. It's very brilliant.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvay_process
User avatar
Hendrick Laursen
Member
 
Posts: 569
Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Location: God's Green Earth
Blog: View Blog (6)
ElectraQTBioWizard liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby ElectraQT on May 13th, 2014, 10:39 pm 

I love finding new things to read about every time I visit. Thanks everyone for the cool suggestions. Please keep them coming!!! :)
User avatar
ElectraQT
Member
 
Posts: 51
Joined: 14 Apr 2014


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Natural ChemE on May 25th, 2014, 5:43 pm 

ElectraQT,

Yup, "concentrations" for surfaces end up just being the number of available surface sites. Stoichiometricly, the quality of being a surface site is kinda like a new chemical element, so it's conserved. For example, if a surface site is either free or bound, then it's just
.

The equations become more fun in more complex reactions, particularly when the total amount of surface sites is varying with time, e.g. if the solid is itself reacting off, changing its total surface area in the process. I just love systems of equations.

As for the crazy long biochemical reactions, yeah, I just meant looking at them conceptually. I never really got into any visual modeling software; it's something I'm always meaning to do but never end up making the time for. My favorite aspect is how self-regulation can be described in such simple terms but have the net effect of homeostasis. That kind of emergent complexity is just beautiful.
Natural ChemE
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: 28 Dec 2009


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on June 5th, 2014, 3:02 pm 

Here are some cool reactions



There is another good one posted by the RI a little while agobut can't find it.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)
Hendrick LaursenElectraQT liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby BioWizard on June 9th, 2014, 10:45 am 

That was incredibly entertaining! What a wonderful and talented presenter.
User avatar
BioWizard
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 12762
Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Location: United States
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on June 22nd, 2014, 3:49 pm 

How about oscillating reactions!! He says about 20 cycles... so not infinite? Is that why we can't live forever? ;)

User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby ElectraQT on June 25th, 2014, 2:39 pm 

[url=/viewtopic.php?p=261857#p261857]BioWizard » June 9th, 2014, 9:45 am[/url] wrote:That was incredibly entertaining! What a wonderful and talented presenter.


Agreed!!!!!!!
User avatar
ElectraQT
Member
 
Posts: 51
Joined: 14 Apr 2014


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Hendrick Laursen on August 5th, 2014, 1:34 am 

Just to keep the thread going, I'm nowadays on Citric Acid cycle or more famously Krebs Cycle.
I think it's necessary for everyone to know this cycle, as it's really how we live.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krebs_Cycle
I rather found it hard to memorize all the steps, but finally managed! thank God!
User avatar
Hendrick Laursen
Member
 
Posts: 569
Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Location: God's Green Earth
Blog: View Blog (6)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby BioWizard on August 5th, 2014, 3:28 pm 

Yep TCA cycle was one of my favorite themes in metabolic biochemistry.
User avatar
BioWizard
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 12762
Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Location: United States
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on March 11th, 2015, 10:43 pm 

a new one

chemistry with Iron Fe

User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)
Hendrick LaursenBioWizard liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Darby on March 12th, 2015, 3:39 am 

I never quite warmed to chemistry in the same way I did for some other fields, but one reaction does spring to mind from one of my past hobbies (homebrewing), and that's the natural enzymatic conversion of the starches in malted barley into fermentable sugars. These enzymes become active when cereal grains are sprouted, and the modern malting process used for brewing barley is designed to help maximize the process.

Alpha amylase: it's most active in the 154-167F range, and creates longer chain sugars that are somewhat less fermentable, and yield a beer with a bit more body. This is the preferred enzyme when making full bodied ales (which is mostly what I was brewing).

Beta amylase: It's most active in the 130-150F range, and promotes the creation of shorter chain sugars that are more fermentable, and result in a drier beer. This is the preferred enzyme when making lighter bodied lagers.


For me, whenever I brewed a beer from all grain, it always seem magical when I added my hot water to the starchy malted barley, and it would slowly turn very sweet, all by itself. Recirculating the lot liquid through a deep bed of grains (which naturally stratifies into a filter of sorts), while maintaining the optimal conversion temperature range, is the core of what is called a "Recirculating Infusion Mash System" (RIMS) in the brewing industry. I jury rigged a small one for home use c.1996, which you can see below. With it, I was able to achieve PPG yield efficiencies in the 27-31 range (mostly around 29-30), which by homebrewing standards of the day was considered excellent.

RIMS_lr5.jpg


The black gizmo is a food grade pump. The tall copper pipe is the heating coil, which I mounted to an upside down coffee can (which raised the height of the intake above the output of the food pump and also provided convenient storage for the power cord). Behind and left of the coffee can is the controller unit, which was nothing more than a pair of potentiometers ... one to control the speed of the pump, the other to control the heat of the coil. The setup was rather primitive ... nowadays, they make computerized controllers with digital thermometer probes, so it's much easier to use. I had to monitor and adjust by hand, with an analog thermometer.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby Darby on March 12th, 2015, 4:07 am 

For those interested in the chemical specifics of Alpha Amylase, and its operation, here's a description.
User avatar
Darby
Active Member
 
Posts: 1188
Joined: 14 Feb 2015
Location: Long Island, New York (USA)
Hendrick LaursenBioWizard liked this post


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on February 18th, 2016, 3:26 am 

Here is a new video of Andrew Szydlo



I'm watching it now. Warning. It starts off slow for the first couple, but he is a very fun entertainer. :)

He introduces a really cool hypothesis story behind the invention of gun powder.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: What's your favorite reaction?

Postby zetreque on January 27th, 2018, 7:36 pm 

Another fun demostration by Andrew Szydlo

This time the chemistry of Fire and Gunpowder.

User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3594
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)



Return to Chemistry

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests