Vitamin K tablets are required daily

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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby Braininvat on July 30th, 2018, 3:43 pm 

It is if he had it printed on parchment. I will look for it. Congrats to you, Doug!
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby doogles on July 30th, 2018, 6:24 pm 

Thank you Sciameriken for letting me know about that. Apparently I misinterpreted one questionnaire in which I clicked off a number of options for presentation of the book, thinking that it was asking about the format I presented it in.

The publication has been a disaster because the graphics have not printed out at all, and yet they represent the main evidence.


I'll have to try to sort it out.


Apologies for any inconvenience
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby SciameriKen on July 30th, 2018, 10:06 pm 

Keep me posted Doogles - I was surprised not to see a standard PDF -- Looking forward to reading it soon!
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby wolfhnd on July 30th, 2018, 10:49 pm 

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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby doogles on July 31st, 2018, 4:52 am 

I don't know what's going on with my book. It seemed to load okay initially and appeared to be ready for sale. The rare file presentation of .pdb was apparently my fault. I misinterpreted one of the questions when I was uploading it and ticked an incorrect box. But fixing that error not only failed to solve the problem, but somehow resulted in there being a flaw of some kind in my MS. It's strange because the converter in my Word software turns it into an ePUB and a Mobi file without any problems and it passed a validation test on a website recommended by Smashwords.

The sample you uploaded looked okay Wolfhnd. The graphics came through all right.

SciameriKen, my apologies. I suspect that their conversion problems have something to do with the number of hyperlinks I have in the document. It looks as if it may take a while to locate the problem. Can I email you a copy of the original manuscript? I'm not sure how to go about that, but I'll look at the instructions in the forum here.
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby Event Horizon on July 31st, 2018, 3:10 pm 

I think vitamin K is one of the few nature-identical or naturally derived supplemets. I commonly take multi vitamins and minerals on top of a fairly healthy diet and have experienced no detrimental effects. Just remember too much Beta carotene can turn your skin orange!
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby doogles on August 27th, 2018, 4:11 am 

Finally, my eBook forms of of VITAMIN K OR A WHEELCHAIR are available on Smashwords (https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/884120) and on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-K-Wheelc ... dpSrc=srch).

Don't download the 'Original Version' on Smashwords. Is not up to standard. It was a good-intentioned attempt by one of their staff to produce a Word version that would pass their 'conversion to eBook". It achieved this end by omitting all internal and eternal links -- and apparently they are unable to replace it with a better version.

Apropos of this thread, I have a short chapter on the interraction of Vitamin D and Vitamin K. Some queries were raised about this earlier in the thread. It was the first time I'd looked at any vitamin D research.

My take briefly, in this book, is that vitamin D (directly or indirectly by mobilizing calcium ions) is essential for the gene expression of proteins within cells. (see https://vitamindwiki.com/291+genes+improved+expression+by+2000+IU+of+vitamin+D+%E2%80%93+RCT+March+2013). This includes those proteins that vitamin K has to carboxylate before they become active.

So, if we have a low vitamin D status, we could show all the effects of vitamin K deficiency (as well as myriads of other conditions). And one medical theorist expresses the opinion that if we have an excess of vitamin D, it could result in an overload of vitamin K-dependent proteins needing activation, thus depleting vitamin K reserves and causing symptoms of vitamin K deficiency (essentially atherosclerosis and its sequelae; see https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987706007171).

My net conclusion relating to the two vitamins is that vitamin K can be present in excessive quantities, but that vitamin D needs to be available within safe limits.

To my mind, vitamin D is still mainly a transporter of calcium throughout the body, but that vitamin K is essential for the activation of the proteins that regulate the deposition of calcium in bones rather than soft tissues.

It is explained at more length in the book.

If time supports the evidence in this book, it may result in an entirely revolutionary attitude towards geriatric medicine at least. Up till now (4 years) it works for me.
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Re: Vitamin K tablets are required daily

Postby doogles on September 24th, 2018, 6:17 am 

I broadened my research base last week by looking for literature on atherosclerosis in dogs. Our older pets show virtually all of the same geriatric conditions that affect human beings.

If you looked at my recent ebook on 'Vitamin K or a Wheelchair' (which essentially describes my own case history of reversal of atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease and became a dissertation on the role of vitamin K deficiency in degenerative diseases), you'll realise that I concluded that atherosclerosis itself could be postulated as the main common factor and precursor to tissue and organ degenerative conditions.

So I found these few articles quite interesting -- Liu et al (1986; https://europepmc.org/abstract/med/3744984) diagnosed atherosclerosis at necropsy in 21 dogs over a 14 years period. Nine of the dogs died and 12 were euthanised because of disease complications. The disease was extensive in affected animals and identified in "coronary, renal, carotid, thyroidal, intestinal, pancreatic, splenic, gastric, prostatic, cerebral, and mesenteric arteries. Macroscopically, the arteries were yellow-white, thick and nodular, and had narrow lumens. Myocardial fibrosis and infarction also were observed in the myocardium. Histologically, affected arterial walls contained foamy cells or vacuoles, cystic spaces, mineralized material, debris with or without eroded intima, and degenerated muscle cells."

Kagawa et al (1998; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 7505801264) recorded their findings on five cases of systemic atherosclerosis in dogs. Lesions were found in the aorta and muscular arteries in many organs, including the heart, spleen, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, alimentary tract, urogenital organs, eyes, prostate and urinary bladder. The authors regarded the lesions as being similar to those found in human beings.

Obviously, because this is a new field of investigation, there are no records associating the atherosclerotic lesions with developing osteoarthritis, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease etc. in domestic animals.(There was one article that showed a very significant association between atherosclerosis in dogs and diabetes mellitus as well as hypothryoidism, but it was aimed only at endocrinological conditions -- Hess et al, 2008; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs ... .tb02469.x).

Mele (2003; http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/do ... 1&type=pdf) claimed that osteoarthritis is very common in dogs. I can verify that it was very common when I was in practice. Now I wonder whether atherosclerosis is more common that we realise in dogs; as I said, we do not appear to have a test we can use clinically in the species. Currently, I have lost contact with veterinary practice, but I do know now that I would be trying a course of the two vitamins K if I were in practice currently.

So, if your aging pet is showing early signs of any of the above conditions, why not try a pro-rata dose of vitamins K1 and K2, the equivalent of 500 micrograms of each for an 80 kg animal. There do not appear to be any records of toxicity of vitamin K.
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