Disease associated with sleeping position

This is not an everything goes forum, but rather a place to ask questions and request help for developing your ideas.

Disease associated with sleeping position

Postby zetreque on January 6th, 2018, 10:22 pm 

For a while now, I have had a theory that there is a correlation between disease instance or frequency and the side a person most often sleeps on.
This can be anything from cancer to more wrinkled skin, tumors, aches, pains, vision problems, mouth gum or teeth issues, ear problems, athletes foot.
I certainly don't think this is 100% true but it is a theory I would like to propose and test if I had the means to see if there is significance. We spend a great amount of out life sleeping and laying on a certain side, it makes sense that that side might have different blood flow, etc. I had a more comprehensive way to propose this idea but it's been so long I just wanted to post it and see what others think.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3275
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (6)


Re: Disease associated with sleeping position

Postby Braininvat on January 7th, 2018, 12:41 am 

There's a fair amount of pop medicine on this, articles like this....

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0, ... leep-tight

People, in sleep studies I've seen, tend to shift position as they sleep - I would guess it's unusual to find someone who actually persists in one position all night. I often start on my back, but roll onto one side or another as the night progresses. Some people with heart valve problems do better on one side than the other.
User avatar
Braininvat
Resident Member
 
Posts: 5937
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Rest in Peace

Postby Faradave on January 7th, 2018, 11:52 am 

Interesting notion.

"Restless sleep" (accompanied by frequent position changes) may itself have negative health associations, such as stress, chemical stimulants, withdrawal of sleep meds, exposure to blue display light etc. Generally, less frequent movement is considered an indicator of deeper, more restful (i.e. "healthy") sleep.

Such a study would need to avoid those prior conditions which immobilize to some degree. The type of mattress would have to be accounted for as those with memory foam will have a different effect on circulation. Handedness may also require correction. It is more defensive to sleep on a side with the dominant arm up and quickly mobile. Those with life partners may adopt particular mutually preferred positions. But having such a partner carries its own positive health correlation.
User avatar
Faradave
Active Member
 
Posts: 1632
Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Location: Times Square (T2)
zetreque liked this post



Return to Personal Theories

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests