SCF Archaeology Library

Discussions unearthing human history including cultural anthropology, linguistics, etc.

SCF Archaeology Library

Postby Silkworm on August 13th, 2006, 1:17 am 

This thread is intended to be a database for links pertaining to information covered by this sub-forum. Links to tutorials, videos, interactive media, etc. will be listed and categorized here. Please feel free to submit any additions for this library in this format:

Name of the Website, Link, 1 sentence description and then possibly a suggestion of what category (tutorials, videos, etc.) the link should go in.

Example:

The eSkeletons Project, http://www.eskeletons.org/, An interactive examination of primate morphology, Interactive Media

This is an example of how the link will be listed with the name of the contributor in parentheses at the end.

Interactive Media

The eSkeletons Project, http://www.eskeletons.org/. An interactive examination of primate morphology. (Silkworm)

Submissions will be listed by category on this particular post, which will be edited to serve as the SCF Anthropology Library, a living document. And as it is living, it will change. Categories added and links added and removed as there is demand for it.

A few quick notes:

1.Please contribute your links. Our combined efforts will make this a valuable and comprehensive internet resource.
2.Please report broken links, make comments, here.
3.If you feel a site is at the apex of quality please endorse it. Recommended links will have a “*” added to them. These should not be taken lightly and only added to the best of the best.


SCF Archaeology Library


Blogs

Zinken, http://zinken.typepad.com/palaeo/. Archaeology blog.

Morphology

The eSkeletons Project, http://www.eskeletons.org/. An interactive examination of primate morphology.

Primatology

The Great Ape Trust, http://www.greatapetrust.org/. Organization specializing in Great Ape conservation and research.

Discovering Chimpanzees, http://sciencenorth.ca/chimp/babylove.htm. This website complements Science North's first major travelling exhibition, Discovering Chimpanzees: The Remarkable World of Jane Goodall.

Videos

Bonobo playing Pacman, http://youtube.com/watch?v=vqvRjHaDX6M. Must see. (Mistwalker)
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Re: SCF Archaeology Library

Postby seouldavid on February 21st, 2010, 3:17 am 

Archaeology Channel - http://www.archaeologychannel.org/
News and podcasts about archaeology.
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Re: SCF Archaeology Library

Postby Forest_Dump on January 28th, 2019, 5:18 pm 

I don't recommend archaeology books very often probably because I tend to be very picky and critical. But I will now recommend:

Michael Nassaney (2015) "The Archaeology of the North American Furniture Trade." University Press of Florida.

It is a continent-wide overview of the fur trade spanning the 17th through 19th centuries. While lots of historical data is referred to the author also makes abundant use of archaeological data and actually learns from that data. I draw attention to that point because IMHO the overwhelming majority of historic archaeologists typically just use archaeology for illustrative purposes (e.g., something interesting happened here - see? A broken cup from that time period!). Or they present elaborate philosophical treatises on how archaeology can help give new insights into history but end up failing to do that in their work. I also like this book because there is actually a very sophisticated grasp on theoretical paradigms ranging from old classic economics to the latest post modernism and all is actually used to provide a terrific and coherent account. It is well written and would be of interest to anyone ranging from a casual reader to a grad student looking for ideas to research and very affordable (I picked up a copy in a museum bookstore for $25). My only complaint is that it is too short (200 pages) and leaves me wanting more. But is that really a complaint?
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