puma punku

Discussions unearthing human history including cultural anthropology, linguistics, etc.

puma punku

Postby cdestroyer on September 16th, 2014, 12:58 pm 

if the estimate for the age of puma punku is correct why would a group of vey primitive people move 10 ton stones.
cdestroyer
 


Re: puma punku

Postby Faradave on September 16th, 2014, 1:18 pm 

I don't know. A coy answer would be, "because they can".

But in thinking about that, consider that no one person can easily do such a thing with primitive implements. Thus, any passing tribe who might witness such a construction, would rightly guess that there is a united, organized group of people with considerable skill and spare energy living here. Be respectful of them!
User avatar
Faradave
Active Member
 
Posts: 1888
Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Location: Times Square (T2)
zetreque liked this post


Re: puma punku

Postby Watson on September 16th, 2014, 1:23 pm 

User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4611
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: puma punku

Postby cdestroyer on September 17th, 2014, 1:52 pm 

ancient aliens huh?...how about ancient ancestors?.....i have not personally been to puma punku so i can only rely on what i see on the net and videos broadcast....some of those stones have a square stepped cut in them that indicate to me something may have fitted in that hole...if that stone was placed flat on the ground along with many others could they not have been used like plynth blocks and used to support a building?
the acute angle on the edges of these stones are reminicent of the pyramid stones which also exhibit the same sharp edge....amazing thing to me about that edge is that after laying exposed to the weather for a very long time that the edge remains as acute. lastly if we accept the premise of et's having been here then why build at such a high altitude? did they breathe the rarified air better?
cdestroyer
 


Re: puma punku

Postby Watson on September 17th, 2014, 3:25 pm 

Well the opening post doesn't provide much information about what you are referring to. And using shift key would make it easier to read your posts.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4611
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: puma punku

Postby cdestroyer on September 17th, 2014, 7:16 pm 

most explanations of age of puma punku and the surrounding structures lead one to believe they were
created by a very primitive peoples...according to best guess extimates i could find on the net
the population of the earth at that time was roughly a million mostly centered in the east, africa, the med...etc...so my question was why would a culture, obviously less then a million strong, would move let
alone create 10 tons stones in order to build the structures seen around puma punku and tiahuancan (sic)...
if as in the reply post insistence is made that the structures were NOT (shift key) made by primitive man but
rather by aliens then i believe theories of ancient aliens would belong under the personal theories section
alongside mine..................
cdestroyer
 


Re: puma punku

Postby Watson on September 18th, 2014, 11:45 am 

i INSIST NOTHING. i WAS JUST ADDING SOME MISSING CONTENT TO THE OP.
User avatar
Watson
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4611
Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Location: Earth, middle of the top half, but only briefly each 24 hours.


Re: puma punku

Postby BurtJordaan on September 18th, 2014, 11:57 am 

Cdest, you are kindly requested to make your posts more readable by using proper capitalization, sentence and paragraph construction.

--
Regards
Jorrie
User avatar
BurtJordaan
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 2718
Joined: 17 Oct 2009
Location: South Africa
Blog: View Blog (9)


Re: puma punku

Postby owleye on September 18th, 2014, 6:56 pm 

BurtJordaan » Thu Sep 18, 2014 9:57 am wrote:Cdest, you are kindly requested to make your posts more readable by using proper capitalization, sentence and paragraph construction.

--
Regards
Jorrie


I fear we are now or have already been infiltrated by the smart-phone sentence and paragraph construction. I don't have one and use my lap-top almost exclusively. But there's a sense in which our language (English, in this case) is being transformed as we speak. I recall spending a fair amount of time responding to someone using my wife's phone and though I've seen the younger generation use it rapidly, I doubt whether any of them rely on so-called correct grammar.

Perhaps someone in your acquaintance has even submitted papers that are so in need of editing that the editors have given up trying to have it right so have allowed the standards themselves to slip.
owleye
 


Re: puma punku

Postby cdestroyer on September 19th, 2014, 2:11 pm 

my apologies for the sentence structure as i was attempting to use the return key to continue my sentence on a new line, however i see that is not necessary as it is done without the use of said key as it mearly wraps around...
cdestroyer
 


Re: puma punku

Postby Marshall on September 19th, 2014, 4:08 pm 

I recall reading about the P. P. site some years back, in Bolivia near Lake Titicaca.

Built by the Tiwanaku civilization, flourished 700-1000 CE. The Tiwanaku had BRONZE and in fact used bronze I-shaped joiners to clamp stone blocks together in some of their their masonry.
Forest can correct me if I'm wrong. I think the Wikipedia article seems reliable, in this case, and so I'll quote it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumapunku#Peak_and_decline
The Tiwanaku civilization and the use of these temples appears to some to have peaked from 700 to 1000 CE. by which point the temples and surrounding area may have been home to some 400,000 people. By this point, an extensive infrastructure had been developed with a complex irrigation system running over 30 square miles (80 km2) to support potatoes, quinoa, corn and other various crops. At its peak the Tiwanaku culture dominated the entire Lake Titicaca basin as well as portions of Bolivia and Chile.[17][18]

The culture in question seems to have dissolved rather abruptly some time around 1000 CE and researchers are still seeking answers as to why. A likely scenario involves rapid environmental change, possibly involving an extended drought. Unable to support the massive crop yields necessary for their large population, the Tiwanaku are argued to have scattered into the local mountain ranges only to disappear shortly thereafter.[17][18] Puma Punku is thought to have been abandoned before it was finished.[19]


I suppose that a later Andean civilization, the Inca, which also had bronze, may have acquired masonry techniques either directly or indirectly from the remnants of the Tiwanaku. There is roughly 300 year gap between the abandonment of the great city of Tiwanaku (presumed scattering of its people) and the appearance of the Inca. Seems to me quite a lot of similarity in their stone cutting and building as if there were some cultural bridge between the two civilizations. But I know very little about this and have not heard of one.

I would imagine that the P. P. site was used as a sacred religious site BEFORE the big surge of stone masonry temple building. It may have been inhabited. It would have gradually developed traditional importance as a ceremonial site prior to the temple building. So digging down to BEFORE 700 CE, it's reasonable that they would find organic material which could be carbon-dated. I think that goes back to around 600 CE.
Marshall
 



Return to Archaeology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests