Folk Wisdom Thread.

All things related to Art! Poetry, painting, literature, visual, theater, movies, tv, music, media, culture, etc. Share your creativity or others', reviews, aesthetic theories, etc.

Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 8th, 2018, 8:12 pm 

I thought I might make a place where we can share folk/oral/learned wisdom. For example, there was an old Indian saying that you don't know a land until you know its shadows. I thought about that. Then I came up with, you do not know a man until you know their shadows.

I wonder what other stuff we can add.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Braininvat on September 8th, 2018, 9:41 pm 

Floss daily. (you included oral wisdom)
User avatar
Braininvat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 6850
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills
Event Horizondandelion liked this post


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 8th, 2018, 10:34 pm 

Learn the difference between friends and Facebook friends.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby dandelion on September 9th, 2018, 5:34 am 

dandelion
Member
 
Posts: 377
Joined: 02 May 2014


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 9th, 2018, 5:29 pm 

Dentistry wasn't quite what I had in mind, but gongrats on finding humour in the OP!
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Braininvat on September 10th, 2018, 12:04 am 

Seriously, it's a good thread topic and I will try later to contribute some folk wisdom.

I would guess you want something more than just Benjamin Franklin type stuff.
User avatar
Braininvat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 6850
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 19th, 2018, 9:13 am 

Example: Lichen does not generally grow on the north side of a tree-trunk. So if one finds oneself lost in a forest, day or night, one can navigate successfully by feeling where the lichen is if it's too dark to see, without having to refer to the stars which will be obscured. Works better in cold climates.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Braininvat on September 19th, 2018, 9:55 am 

Lichen grow only on the north side of trees. It is sensitive to direct sun, so it stays on the north side in the northern hemisphere.
User avatar
Braininvat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 6850
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 19th, 2018, 11:17 am 

But a rolling stone gathers no moss.

This old folk saying is physically accurate, and a good summary of a human situation. You also have to think about the implications to realize just how pithy an observation it is.
Sometimes I think our ancestors of two thousand years ago were smarter than in we are.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Braininvat on September 19th, 2018, 12:05 pm 

One I've always liked, particularly in how you grow deeper in your understanding of its truth:

The world doesn't owe you happiness.
User avatar
Braininvat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 6850
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 19th, 2018, 2:55 pm 

I'm used to hearing the capitalist version: "The world doesn't owe you a living." That could be more controversial.
But you reminded me of the problem I've had the whole modern notion of happiness. Or rather the notion that everyone should be happy all the time. In the Christian framework, unhappiness is the symptom of your wrong-headedness; transgression and guilt, or lack of faith or desire for that which the Lord in His wisdom (or the world) hath declined to provide. In the western industrialist framework, unhappiness is a dysfunction, a condition you can correct by making life choices better aligned with your society's values, or by paying for therapy/medication.
Either way, it's wrong; it's a flaw - and it's all your fault.

Ancient peoples didn't expect happiness. If they found some, it was to be celebrated in the clear understanding of its transience.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 12:16 pm 

The exception being Zionist, where people do believe the world owes them a living. I have photos somewhere quote "The world owes us a living. If I can find it, I will post it.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 12:18 pm 

Thanks also for the lichen "compass" correction. I think I miss-remembered. Better to get it right.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 12:23 pm 

To tan the hide of a caribou, clean the skin and work its brain matter into the pelt and you end up with nubuck leather.
I have no idea how it works tho.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 20th, 2018, 4:24 pm 

Event Horizon » September 20th, 2018, 11:23 am wrote:To tan the hide of a caribou, clean the skin and work its brain matter into the pelt and you end up with nubuck leather.
I have no idea how it works tho.

The objective being to water-proof the leather?
I should imagine you could substitute interstitial fat tissue for the brain. But they're probably using that for lamp oil/tallow, since it's more pure fat (brain is only about 60% fat and it's well integrated with other tissues) and would burn better, or rendering it down for cooking. Bone marrow would work, too, but the dogs need it for cold-proofing.

To remove tiny fragments of matter, or any kind of potentially inflammatory contaminant, from a wound, pack it with tomatoes, cut in half, cut side to the wound, then wrap in cloth. Change the poultice every second day.
I thought that was nonsense until I stepped on a rusty nail and my father insisted on treating it that way. Two days later, the tomato halves were full of rust particles and my foot didn't get infected. Didn't hurt much, either; the poultice kept it cool and soft. Three applications: when the tomato came off clean, we put on a normal bandage and let it heal.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011
Braininvat liked this post


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 5:39 pm 

Amazing. I've not heard tomatoes had such properties. They are mildly acid, it could be an electrolytic thing perhaps. An unusual one that.

Again, if in the wilds it is possible to make your own epoxy resin from fir sap boiled with beeswax. Is mostly useful for making tools and weapons.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 7:18 pm 

Good ways of making fire:

1/ Even a dead lithium battery can catch fire when damaged.
2/ I have a magnesium rod and striker around my neck when I go outwards bound. Its sparks are quite impressive and hot enough to light most tinder.
3/ You can fluff up some wire wool, and arc it across a battery. It will catch fire, but burns pretty fast.
4/ Arcing a piece of pencil lead across a 12v battery can cause it to glow white hot. Wear sunglasses if you have any.
5/ A magnifying glass. In the summer months, a humble magnifying class can get you out of trouble. It will ignite multiple items. I dunno how hot it gets at the focus point. Does anyone know?
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 20th, 2018, 7:23 pm 

What kind of 'folk' had lithium batteries? Or steel wool? Wouldn't it be simpler to carry a gas lighter?
I've done it once - only once, since it took about an hour - with flint.
Mostly just matches.
But I do know what starting materials to look for. Actually, dry grass is best.

As for the tomato trick, yes, it's mostly the acid: it sucks pus, lymph and plasma out by osmosis, and the particulates just come along. But it also has an antibiotic effect to prevent infection. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC518236/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9949491 Seems it's been studied in medicine for some time, but known to old wives much longer.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 20th, 2018, 7:37 pm 

Heh! I took those from a famous case where a couple got stranded in outback Australia. The Aussies are great at lateral thinking sometimes.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 20th, 2018, 8:57 pm 

They make some good films, as well.
But I'm not eating iguana!
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby BadgerJelly on September 20th, 2018, 10:22 pm 

Event Horizon » September 21st, 2018, 12:23 am wrote:To tan the hide of a caribou, clean the skin and work its brain matter into the pelt and you end up with nubuck leather.
I have no idea how it works tho.


Ray Mears? I saw that episode :)
User avatar
BadgerJelly
Resident Member
 
Posts: 5359
Joined: 14 Mar 2012


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 21st, 2018, 12:32 am 

I think around 70% of current pharmacological drugs are plant derived. A great many "Old wives tales" and first nation lore has led to many "discoveries". I am not so keen to dismiss it. Be sceptical for sure, but we are still hunting the forests nevertheless.
A book that describes the plants and their properties is "A modern Herbal" by Mrs M Grieve. You can see many analogues in modern medicine today.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 21st, 2018, 12:46 am 

No surprise. People have always skinned their knees, eaten past-its-prime fish and contracted VD. The search for relief is as old as pain itself. Cats choose very particular grasses to chew when they have a tummy-ache; wild boar know to wallow in pond scum (algae) when they've been stung by wasps. I suppose early humans watched even older animals find remedies, then looked for more remedies themselves, experimented, observed, noted, tested....
We didn't just invent science last thursday.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 21st, 2018, 2:06 am 

You are right, science is just a blip in historical length. Prior to that, every chemist knew the property of every plant at their disposal. I think they have much to teach us still.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 21st, 2018, 10:39 am 

Event Horizon » September 21st, 2018, 1:06 am wrote:You are right, science is just a blip in historical length. Prior to that, every chemist knew the property of every plant at their disposal. I think they have much to teach us still.

The formal statement of Scientific Method is recent; science itself is practiced by all creatures with brains. In our arrogance of modernity, we choose to call the science of the past "trial and error" - another term for experimentation.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 22nd, 2018, 5:17 pm 

Yeah, it was by experimenting that thousands of years of herblore were passed on. Even early chemistry was at work. Who would think to take liquid mercury for crohn's type diseases? It still is used occasionally I believe.
We are loosing this "natural science" pretty fast in favour of pharmaceuticals.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 22nd, 2018, 6:42 pm 

Well, there's no $$billions in something you can grow in your own backyard (like MJ or poppies) or pick by the roadside. Of course, a lot of those natural remedies are harmful - sometimes fatal - if used incorrectly, or in excess... but then, so are prescription drugs.
Then, too, we have some 'natural' medicine making a comeback in the hands of quacks and fraudsters who still make lots of profit, even if their patented remedies don't do anything at all.

I have no objection to purifying and taming wild substances; I have no objection to regulation and restriction.
What would be nice to see is balance, moderation and common sense....

...plus the moon, a couple of stars, a nebula and some asteroid sprinkles on top.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 22nd, 2018, 10:27 pm 

A quasar would be nice, but i've always had expensive taste.

I quite agree, and fraudsters do profit fraudulently. I know if i am down there's Valerian or St Johns wort. If I need aspirin, there's willow bark. I could go on for ages. (I'm a big fan of sphagnum moss too!)
We should all know this. People seem very detached from nature now.
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Serpent on September 23rd, 2018, 8:56 am 

There's not so many peat bogs anymore; they've been drained for farmland or building sites, which is why peat-moss, and especially sphagnum, which is just the top layer, are so expensive now.
But, if we don't need large quantities, we can grow our own.
https://dengarden.com/gardening/how-to-grow-moss-and-start-a-moss-garden
Just collect a few specimen starters next time you're lost in the woods.
In our neighbouring ex-gravel pit/bush, there are several species of lush, long-fronded dark green moss on the ground under conifers, on and among rocks, on cedar fence-rails, on tree-trunks (north and east side) and on a couple of abandoned wooden wagons that are slowly being reclaimed by nature.

A moss garden makes a very attractive winter humidifier - beats the hell out of wet towels draped over the radiator.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3130
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Folk Wisdom Thread.

Postby Event Horizon on September 26th, 2018, 5:31 pm 

I went out and lived in the back-woods for a couple of years in a kinda waldenesque way. Someone asked me why I was doing it, i told her I like the wallpaper. I just gotta get back to nature and live deliberately for myself sometimes. I would heartily recommend that those that can do so. The Nigerians gave me a Nigerian name, Ara Oko. Bush-man. I don't really like this construct, this society model very much. Heh! Nature, it grows on you! I did environmental biology because I wanted to know how it all worked, the bioinfrastructure. I think I just invented a new word/field...yay!
User avatar
Event Horizon
Member
 
Posts: 366
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Location: England somewhere.
Serpent liked this post


Next

Return to Art

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests