Nietzsche Quote

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Nietzsche Quote

Postby BadgerJelly on January 22nd, 2018, 9:22 pm 

I am having a little trouble dealing with this from his "Interludes and Maxims"

I think I get the general idea of what he meant, but also feel like I am lacking in exactly how to paraphrase this:

'Knowledge for its own sake' - this is the last snare set by morality: one therewith gets completely entangled within it once more.


Often with Nietzsche a couple of lines can be paraphrased into several, or more, paragraphs. How would you translate this?
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Re: Nietzsche Quote

Postby Inrealtime87 on January 27th, 2018, 1:59 pm 

The idea of knowledge-in-itself is necessary for there to be morality-in-itself, and a true moral conception of the world, as moral laws must be grasped a priori and in order for moral laws to be grasped a priori there must be knowledge a priori.
So if you accept that things can be known a priori, that there is a knowledge-in-itself, consequently you accept there is a morality-in-itself.
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Re: Nietzsche Quote

Postby Inrealtime87 on January 27th, 2018, 2:23 pm 

Here is what Nietzsche says on page 287 of the Will to Power:

The legitimacy of belief in knowledge is always presupposed:
just as the legitimacy of the feelings of conscience-judgments is
presupposed. Here moral ontology is the dominant prejudice.
The conclusion is therefore:
1. there are assertions that we consider universally valid and
necessary;
2. necessity and universal validity cannot be derived from
experience;
3. consequently they must be founded, not upon experience,
but upon something else, and derive from another source of
knowledge!
(Kant infers (1) there are assertions which are valid only
under a certain condition; (2) this condition is that they derive,
not from experience, but from pure reason.)
Therefore: the question is, whence do we derive our reasons
for believing in the truth of such assertions? No, how our belief
is caused! But the origin of a belief, of a strong conviction, is a
psychological problem: and a very narrow and limited experience
often produces such a belief! It already presupposes that there
is not Hdata a posteriori" but also data a priori, "preceding experience."
Necessity and universal validity could never be given
to us by experience: why does that mean that they are present
without any experience at all?
There afe no isolated judgments!
An isolated judgment is never "true," never knowledge; only
in the connection and relation of many judgments is there any
surety.
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Re: Nietzsche Quote

Postby parsoff on February 8th, 2018, 5:03 pm 

BadgerJelly » January 23rd, 2018, 3:22 am wrote:I am having a little trouble dealing with this from his "Interludes and Maxims"

I think I get the general idea of what he meant, but also feel like I am lacking in exactly how to paraphrase this:

'Knowledge for its own sake' - this is the last snare set by morality: one therewith gets completely entangled within it once more.


Often with Nietzsche a couple of lines can be paraphrased into several, or more, paragraphs. How would you translate this?



I translate this that knowledge can not be growing inside you as an organ. Using knowledge is not going to bring you outside reality, the reality where the body functions like it is designed.
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