CAMUS

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CAMUS

Postby Giacomo on November 4th, 2006, 4:59 pm 

What does Camus mean by "the absurd" and "the feeling of absurdity"?

What is absurd freedom ? How does it differ from the kind of freedom we experience in ordinary life?

How does Camus reject rationalism ? and, why ?

Why does Camus consider Sisyphus a tragic hero?
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Postby chingwenjing on November 7th, 2006, 11:41 am 

What does Camus mean by "the absurd" and "the feeling of absurdity"?

The absurd is the reality of the every our lives. In Camus’s novel” outsider”, he shows the truth of absurdity. Our every day life is full of absurdity, like the Meursault was sentenced to death.
The novel tells the story of an alienated man, who eventually commits a murder and waits to be executed for it.
At the start of the novel, Meursault goes to his mother's funeral, where he does not express any emotions and is entirely unaffected by it. The novel continues to document the next few days of his life, through the first person point-of-view. In these days, he befriends one of his neighbors, Raymond Sintes. He aids Raymond in dismissing one of his Arab mistresses. Later, the two confront the woman's brother ("the Arab") on a beach and Raymond gets cut in the resulting knife fight. Meursault afterwards goes back to the beach and shoots the Arab once, in response to the glare of the sun. The Arab is killed, but Mersault fires four more times at the dead body.
At the trial, the prosecution focuses on the inability or unwillingness of Meursault to cry at his mother's funeral, considered suspect by the authorities. The killing of the Arab apparently is less important than whether Meursault is capable of remorse. The argument follows that if Meursault is incapable of remorse, he should be considered a dangerous misanthrope and subsequently executed to prevent him from doing it again, and making him an example to those considering murder.
As the novel comes to a close, Meursault meets with a chaplain, and is enraged by the chaplain's insistence that he turn to God. The novel ends with Meursault recognizing the universe's indifference for humankind. The final lines echo his new realization: "As if that blind rage had washed me clean, rid me of hope; for the first time, in that night alive with signs and stars, I opened myself to the gentle indifference of the world. Finding it so much like myself - so like a brother, really - I felt that I had been happy and that I was happy again. For everything to be consummated, for me to feel less alone, I had only to wish that there be a large crowd of spectators the day of my execution and that they greet me with cries of hate."



What is absurd freedom ? How does it differ from the kind of freedom we experience in ordinary life?


The absurd freedom comes from the rebellion of god, while Kierkegaard explains that the absurdity of certain religious truths prevent us from reaching God rationally. Camus told us that only negated the existence of god; we can get the complete freedom.


How does Camus reject rationalism ? and, why ?

Because there are not any rational objects exist at all, we have no choice but reject the rationalism.

Why does Camus consider Sisyphus a tragic hero?

The tragedy of Sisyphus shows the real fate of human being, like the endless tortures of Sisyphus which god punish the Sisphus,but he still push the stones again and again.
The same tragedy is the human being’s fate, there is no eternity, after our death, all became dust, no eternal meaning in our lives. But we still live like Sisphus, survive bravely.
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Re: CAMUS

Postby Annemieke on November 8th, 2006, 11:06 am 

Reading about Camus it reminded me of the 10 Paradoxical Commandments, especially this one:

What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
Build anyway.

Here you find the other 9:
http://www.kentmkeith.com/commandments.html
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Re: CAMUS

Postby noahaaaa on January 8th, 2017, 12:05 pm 

What does Camus mean by "the absurd" and "the feeling of absurdity"?

Camus idea of the absurd is to try and find meaning in a world where you are alone and by yourself.
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Re: CAMUS

Postby mitchellmckain on January 23rd, 2017, 8:45 pm 

Giacomo » November 4th, 2006, 3:59 pm wrote:Why does Camus consider Sisyphus a tragic hero?


Our only freedom in life is to choose what we will do in the circumstances we find ourselves. Thus we can choose to refuse to capitulate to threats and punishment of all-powerful gods and even find moral satisfaction in resisting them even when it is hopeless.

This does not mean that we are always free to choose everything we do. In "The Stranger", Meursault does not feel like his shooting of the Arab was a act of free will choice but that the effects of heat and the glare of the sun in effect took that choice away from him. He feels no remorse for this action which he did not choose to do and he feels no need to play the dishonest game at the trial of saying what they want him to say in order to set him free.
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Re: CAMUS

Postby vivian maxine on January 24th, 2017, 10:02 am 

Good thread; great explanations; excellent points. Thanks
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