Spatial thinking

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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby JohnD on October 2nd, 2020, 10:22 pm 

Obviously we have opposite views of thinking and memory. To me thinking has always come first. We were thinking before we emerged from the womb. Memory however takes time to accumulate. It comes from knowledge obtained from thought. It is tainted with our perception of events yet, come the next adventure we rely on our memory for a logical course. We don’t have to, memories last for as long as we perceive a need for their guidance.
In regards to meditation you confuse it with mind control and hypnosis. Both are very different. Why would you look for more than the quiet of a peaceful mind from meditation? If you can achieve this from normal sleep that’s great however I find when I sleep my thoughts are still present though I may not be consciously aware of them. It takes time for the brain to process the day’s happenings. Meditation properly exercise and practised will do in 20 minutes what sleep takes all night to do. It’s not a superpower however, the brain is magnificent.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby charon on October 3rd, 2020, 1:51 am 

John D -

Who is your post addressed to? I have to assume it's myself since I was the last to post before this. On the other hand you've been talking to others too.

Obviously we have opposite views of thinking and memory.


First, why should we have 'views'? Opinions only breed dissent. Thinking is thinking, which we all do, and memory is memory, the collection of past events recorded in the brain. Why have views? It's factual.

To me thinking has always come first. We were thinking before we emerged from the womb.


I'm sorry, but how do you know that? That's obviously a strange assertion. I certainly don't remember anything like that! You must be different.

Memory however takes time to accumulate.


Memory certainly takes time to accumulate, obviously. Presumably it starts when we're born and begin experiencing life on earth :-) Any other assertion would have to be proven beyond reasonable doubt.

It comes from knowledge obtained from thought.


All right, but where does the thought come from? Is thought independent of knowledge? You're saying thought first, then knowledge.

I'd be wary, personally, of making assertions of things beyond our ken. I don't know how babies think, or even if they do. Presumably the brain is recording events but they have no language. Most of our thinking is done with words, isn't it? But recognition of, say, the mother's face and touch would be there... I really don't know.

I'm also not sure it's relevant. We have to deal with things as they are now, with ourselves as we know things now.

In regards to meditation you confuse it with mind control and hypnosis


Not at all, I'm saying categorically that anything like that is absolutely not meditation in its right sense at all. The word means to think over, ponder over, and so on, that's all. I actually think the purveyors of these repetitive techniques have hijacked the word and used it for their own purposes.

Why would you look for more than the quiet of a peaceful mind from meditation?


Because the 'quiet of a peaceful mind' may be nothing at all. As you say, a bit of restful peace and quiet will do that. It's not much, is it? THe idea that you have to sit in a corner and do some weird stuff to get a peaceful mind seems a bit odd to me. It's a long way round to not much. It's also not very logical.

I find when I sleep my thoughts are still present though I may not be consciously aware of them. It takes time for the brain to process the day’s happenings.


Exactly. If the day's happenings aren't entirely sorted out before sleep they have to be sorted out during it, hence dreams, agitation, and so on. And if the agitation is really bad it's hard to sleep at all.

Meditation properly exercise and practised will do in 20 minutes what sleep takes all night to do.


So what are you saying? That practising a methodical technique will give understanding of the day's events? Why not understand them as they take place?

I don't see how a mind practising a system can understand anything. It's occupied with things that have happened - otherwise it would already be quiet and silent - and is now occupied with its practice. So that's an extra occupation. And apparently all this occupation and activity will produce a quiet mind.

I'm afraid it won't, will it? The events of each day, each moment, have to be understood intelligently so order in the brain is established. Order is silence because everything is sorted out, there's no disruption.

That's why I'm saying it has to be done as we go along. After that it becomes much more difficult. But, since we're not perfect in our attentiveness, some things may have to be looked at later. But all this has to do with daily living, daily events, daily actions, it's not apart from that.

I don't think a person whose brain is sorted out needs to practice anything. Nor do I think practising something is going to provide an intelligent understanding of daily interaction.

Practising is mechanical, repetitive, after the event, intelligent comprehension in the moment is not.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby JohnD on October 6th, 2020, 5:30 am 

Comprehension in the moment is much more practised. It needs focus. In life we focus on singular paths and block out alternatives. Choosing to look at alternatives requires great care. It isn't just a matter of saying don't focus on the singular but rather searching for all alternatives. That's much harder.
The perceived order of the brain and daily events is to sit and sort through the events and place them in some order to be retained or forgotten. This is stressful and the cause of anxiety in many. What is more common is to forget all but the most important events of the day. Every day is after the event, you can't review a day while it progresses.
Meditation becomes like a time-out. Stop your mind from thinking of anything but the basics. Twenty minutes is equal to a whole night's sleep. I believe Gandhi practised it and didn't sleep at all.
My proposal is this can be practised to expand the way we think. Following a system is what we do everyday no matter the work we do, even if it is to fill a ledger at one point you learnt through practice and then eventually you understood.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby charon on October 6th, 2020, 6:48 am 

John -

Comprehension in the moment is much more practised


What is this obsession with practice? Life isn't playing the piano or some other activity, it's ongoing, constantly. Events, relationships have to be understood in the moment. One can't practice such understanding, it's either happening or it's not. What is there to practice?

In life we focus on singular paths and block out alternatives. Choosing to look at alternatives requires great care.


But what's the need of choice at all? Things happen on the instant, we don't choose them. Things are going to take place today. I'm not talking about a business meeting where decisions are made after consideration, I'm talking about life in relationship with each other.

Life is exactly that, isn't it? The interaction with others, at home, in the workplace, a shop, a cafe, everywhere. It's in our contact with others that the difficulties arise.

There's no time to choose. The word, the action, is gone before we know it. Someone who is wary, defensive, choosing every move, is a pain to themselves and everybody else, they're on a wrong footing right from the start. No wonder our lives are so awful.

The perceived order of the brain and daily events is to sit and sort through the events and place them in some order to be retained or forgotten. This is stressful and the cause of anxiety in many.


But that can't be done as the events are taking place. You can't suddenly say to your boss - or your wife or friend - 'Just a sec, I've got to sit and sort my brain out'!

We don't know how to live, that's the problem. We don't know how to live without tension, conflict, worrying, choosing. Obviously that way of life is a nightmare.

you can't review a day while it progresses


You can't review it, no. Reviewing it means to view it again, to go over it after it's gone. But if one is awake at the moment these things take place and our responses are correct, born of attention, then problems don't arise. It's only when we become inattentive and do or say the wrong things that we need to review them later.

So daily living means full attention. It's probably like driving, one has to pay serious attention to the road. It's the inattentive driver who causes accidents. Similarly, the daily living needs just as much attention otherwise things go wrong.

That attention isn't something one practices; it can't be practised. Someone 'practising attention' isn't paying attention at all. So attention has to be there as a natural state, and it is there inevitably when one sees the necessity of it.

Meditation becomes like a time-out. Stop your mind from thinking of anything but the basics. Twenty minutes is equal to a whole night's sleep.


You said that before and you're repeating it. So, for you, meditation is separate from the living. You live, go along, then have to meditate later.

Is that meditation? Is meditation stopping your mind from thinking? CAN you stop your mind from thinking?

Why is your mind thinking? Not how to stop it, you can't, but why? There's usually just a general sort of superficial activity but, when there's a real worry, it's pointing to something wrong, surely? And that something needs looking at, like a cut finger needs looking at.

But we don't look, we practice, which is completely irrelevant. Looking means listening, finding out what's going on so we can understand it. That's the way of intelligence, not practising something. That's idiotic.

My proposal is this can be practised to expand the way we think. Following a system is what we do everyday no matter the work we do, even if it is to fill a ledger at one point you learnt through practice and then eventually you understood.


No, we already think like that. We think in terms of systems, techniques, methods. They are all 'how's' - how to quiet the mind, how to do this and that, how to become a millionaire!

I wonder if you see that it's all based on acquisition? As we want to achieve success in our business life so we want to achieve or acquire serenity, a quiet mind, or some other such thing. And is that really the point of meditation?

If mediation is just a method to achieve success then it's not meditation at all, is it? Like I said at the beginning, it might be all right for those with stressful lives to compensate by 'meditating' - which is really just a different way of having a drink or taking a pill - but let's not call it meditation in its true sense.

So what is meditation in that case? This may not interest someone who just wants to get de-stressed but one should know the difference so one isn't fooled by these things.

Have you any interest in that? Or are you so certain about what you consider meditation to be that you look no further?

I'm not trying to sell you something, by the way, it's not like that at all. Meditation is the attention we pay to life. It's intrinsic in the living itself, not away from it.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby BadgerJelly on October 7th, 2020, 12:12 am 

Charon -

I have a suggestion ... read your above post as if it was written by someone else and then offer a rebuttal ;)
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby charon on October 7th, 2020, 1:23 am 

Why should I rebut it? What's wrong with it?
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby neuro on October 9th, 2020, 7:15 am 

Interesting post, Badger

maieutic and socratic, eh?
Not kidding, given the topic of the thread: "try and look at things from a different perspective"...

Still, I think charon is playing a nice role here, a role opposed to that of JohnD: charon adopts an existentially RELATIONAL perspective - we are and live in relations and relations are the important part of our life, so how and what we think afterwards is not what matters - whereas JohnD adopts an existentially speculative, philosophical perspective - we are because we think and revising our ideas is the important part of our life...

Is anybody here surprised that Badger the philosopher asks charon - and not JohnD - to try a different perspective...? :°)
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby charon on October 9th, 2020, 7:55 am 

so how and what we think afterwards


Before, during, and afterwards. How and what we think is important at all times. What we think is what we are and if we think wrongly that's the world we create.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby BadgerJelly on October 12th, 2020, 4:01 am 

neuro wrote:Interesting post, Badger

maieutic and socratic, eh?
Not kidding, given the topic of the thread: "try and look at things from a different perspective"...

Still, I think charon is playing a nice role here, a role opposed to that of JohnD: charon adopts an existentially RELATIONAL perspective - we are and live in relations and relations are the important part of our life, so how and what we think afterwards is not what matters - whereas JohnD adopts an existentially speculative, philosophical perspective - we are because we think and revising our ideas is the important part of our life...

Is anybody here surprised that Badger the philosopher asks charon - and not JohnD - to try a different perspective...? :°)



See here:

Why is everything based on thought? Mediation isn't thought, meditation is the ending of thought!


Followed later by ...

Not at all, I'm saying categorically that anything like that is absolutely not meditation in its right sense at all. The word means to think over, ponder over, and so on, that's all.


There is another instance from months ago that relates to another thread I started. The pattern isn’t promising so I made a request ... it will be ignored now though due to reasons of the ego (or maybe answered due to reasons of the ego) >:{l
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby JohnD on October 16th, 2020, 11:32 pm 

Hi Charon, Badger and everyone else who has or may have input into this discussion.
Philosophy considers questions not answerable otherwise. Whether it is of physics, life, genealogy, biology or whatever field of science we ponder. It is not always evidence based, or at least it should not be, because if it were then a lot of ideas are missed. Philosophy is not to be confused with debating, it is about considering, questioning and expanding on the idea of one to hopefully be a subject for discussion by others that follow. We should never qualify it with boundaries pertaining to the style of argument and consider proposals only on the grounds of a person being pro or against a particular school of thought. We need to consider ideas on their own merit. With due consideration, questioning and possible input from others a rational comes to being.
So now lets get back to my original proposal of expanding human thinking.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby BadgerJelly on October 17th, 2020, 12:32 am 

Pluralism seems to be a place to start - rather than siding with some ‘pure’ relativism.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby charon on October 17th, 2020, 4:03 am 

John -

So now lets get back to my original proposal of expanding human thinking.


What do you mean by 'expanding' thinking?

You said at the start:

Spatial thinking is delimiting the direction of our thinking. Like a 3D hologram, spatial thinking is seeing the problem in its 3D form.


Let's say we see 2+2 = ? on a page. We might puzzle over what those symbols mean. But if we envisage a room with two people in it, and two more come in, then there are four people. We see the whole thing like watching a film.

Is that what you mean? Let's be clear.
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Re: Spatial thinking

Postby BadgerJelly on October 19th, 2020, 5:37 am 

JohnD » October 17th, 2020, 11:32 am wrote:Hi Charon, Badger and everyone else who has or may have input into this discussion.
Philosophy considers questions not answerable otherwise. Whether it is of physics, life, genealogy, biology or whatever field of science we ponder. It is not always evidence based, or at least it should not be, because if it were then a lot of ideas are missed. Philosophy is not to be confused with debating, it is about considering, questioning and expanding on the idea of one to hopefully be a subject for discussion by others that follow. We should never qualify it with boundaries pertaining to the style of argument and consider proposals only on the grounds of a person being pro or against a particular school of thought. We need to consider ideas on their own merit. With due consideration, questioning and possible input from others a rational comes to being.
So now lets get back to my original proposal of expanding human thinking.


Just to be clear. The term ‘pluralism’ (funnily enough) has a plurality of meanings within specific areas of philosophical interest.

Here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluralism_(philosophy)#Logical_pluralism

I’m not sure which use you’re talking of or what it is you’re suggesting exactly?

I completely agree that ‘expanding human thinking’ is important. You seem to have framed this as an item of ‘pluralism’ - the question is what you want to discuss, where you wish to discuss it (within what field of interest) and how you personally are making claims of what possesses ‘merit’: as well as what ‘merit’ within the given context? I think the latter question is probably the most tricky as you seem to be saying that ‘expanding’ is ‘better’ (ie. has greater merit than limited investigation).

Of course we all well know that there is a fine balance. Such is what I find of interest. The ‘optimal’ and the very idea of an ‘optimal’ approach.

There are a number of ways this line of thinking could branch off.

To sum up, it would help the discussion - from my perspective - if you were to use some specific examples (although I do appreciate that maybe you’re actually trying to avoid such so as not to lead into too confined a discussion on one specific aspect of heuristics).
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