The fastest growing black hole to date has been found

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The fastest growing black hole to date has been found

Postby Event Horizon on May 16th, 2018, 5:24 pm 

According to this article in Livescience, the fastest growing black-hole known has been discovered. Already supermassive, it consumes suns like ours every two days. I can't tell you much about it, it's not something I know much about, but our astronomical fraternity might find it very interesting.
It seems to be very ancient, and seems to have scientists rather baffled...

Article:
https://www.livescience.com/62581-super ... e-sun.html
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Re: The fastest growing black hole to date has been found

Postby mitchellmckain on May 17th, 2018, 4:54 am 

I was looking for a name of this object to confirm the suspicion that a collision of galaxies is involved. Normally the danger from a black holes is minimal because of the need to shed most of your angular momentum before you can get sucked into the thing. Thus if this things is gobbling up so many stars something must have disrupted the angular momentum you would expect the stars to have. I have a hard time believing that even elliptical galaxies lack significant angular moment for then they would simply collapse under their own gravity.
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Re: The fastest growing black hole to date has been found

Postby BurtJordaan on May 18th, 2018, 12:05 am 

The danger is being irradiated to destruction, because BH's normally swallows only nearby gas and dust, which shed angular momentum through compression- and friction/collision-heating. If there is a lot of this stuff, this results in very strong UV/Xray radiation.

We are seeing this monster when it was very young, so the host galaxy probably still had a lot of stuff in it's central area. Nearby galaxies are much-much older, so there is little chance of having that ultra violent cores - the central stuff must have been eaten long ago.
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Re: The fastest growing black hole to date has been found

Postby BurtJordaan on May 18th, 2018, 12:49 am 

mitchellmckain » 17 May 2018, 10:54 wrote:I was looking for a name of this object to confirm the suspicion that a collision of galaxies is involved.

According to https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.04317 it seems to be "succinctly" named: Quasar SMSS J215728.21-360215.1
I somewhat doubt it that two galaxies could have formed and merged in just over one billion years after the Big event.
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Re: BH "it eats suns like ours for breakfast"

Postby BurtJordaan on May 18th, 2018, 3:11 am 

Fromhttps://www.livescience.com/62581-supermassive-black-hole-could-eat-the-sun.html
The supermassive object is estimated to be more than 12 billion years old, have a mass greater than 20 billion suns and could be growing at a rate of about 1 percent every 1 million years.

So how long is "breakfast (eating the equivalent of a sun like ours)" in that estimate? Let's see: 12 billion years ago it had a mass of at least 20 billion suns and it grew at some 1% per million years. So that's 200 million suns per million years, or 200 suns per year. So it should have taken about 22 months to eat one sun. Obviously negligible on cosmic timescales.

Its appetite would have gone up for some time, but once the available food has been devoured it had less to eat. Presently it might be completely starved - that is unless something like a galaxy merger (as Mitch suggested) could have supplied more food. But our future generations should never be able to observe its ultimate fate, because presently it is already very far behind the cosmic event horizon.
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