re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

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re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby hyksos on July 1st, 2015, 5:48 pm 

In this thread I will be talking about ways for a hybrid gasoline/electric car to charge its batteries. Examples include, heat from the engine, regenerative breaking, or even crazier ideas.

Robert Yost has made himself into an internet laughing stock, by claiming additional energy could be harvested for the car's battery, from wind passing by the car during fast driving. Or perhaps, Yost gets the last laugh here, since he convinced some investors that this actually works, and took their money.

http://www.waaytv.com/tech_alabama/photos-wind-powered-huntsville-vehicle-nearing-completion/article_f1aec832-1ea5-11e5-b870-cf80db9b8448.html

The investors could have saved some cash, had they gone and asked a physics teacher at a local high school if this is feasible.

(Meanwhile back in reality,) Honda has made serious attempts to harvest the excess heat of the engine to charge the car's battery. http://www.cnet.com/news/honda-looking-at-engine-heat-to-power-hybrids/

As engineers would admit, this is not as easy as it sounds. Honda's engineers have an idea of getting water into the mix and making steam. But that seems redundant to me. A much better idea, particularly if efficiency is the issue, is to replace some fins on the radiator with Stirling engines.

In more detail : the fan behind the radiator will drastically cool one portion of a beta Stirling engine cylinder, while the hot portion will lie against the very hot zone of the radiator near the top. Or better yet, the inlet pipe into the radiator could surround the "hot side" of the beta cylinder and the cool side could lie inside the radiator in front of the fan (with its own fins).

Image

We can continue taking this design methodology to its logical end. In this scenario there is no radiator at all, and all parts have been replaced by cylinders from Stirling engines. The coolant leaves the engine block and travels around a serpentine path between an array of cylinders, such that their cool ends are in front of a fan spun by the engine (formerly the "radiator fan"). The individual flywheels of each Stirling are tasked with charging and independent capacitor. Electrical circuits could then bring any, some, or all of those capacitors to bear on a circuit for charging the principle battery.
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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby zetreque on July 1st, 2015, 8:59 pm 

The wind idea might work if you parked your car in a windy location, but not during driving.

I hope to see solar panels installed on cars in the future. Easy to incorporate them into the hood, roof, or trunk. The Quantum Fisker was doing just that, but because of poor management and probably corruption, the car didn't really make it.

Since I love hydrogen technology, for fun I actually did my own experiment a while back. I connected leads to my battery which I ran to some stainless steel submerged in a container of water (a basic electrolyser). The hydrogen and oxygen gas was then run via a tube to the intake of the carburetor fuel injection. The idea is that additional hydrogen being added to the gasoline during combustion might give more power and gas mileage. I also think that the engine is pushing the alternator anyway it would improve efficiency when the alternator is not doing anything... I also know that the engine works harder when there is a load on the alternator though so I just wanted to test if it would still improve efficiency. My results were inconclusive and a devastating life event happened at that time forcing me to abandon the experiment.

There have been other people you can find on youtube that have tried it, but not being that meticulous in testing for results. Despite opponents of it, I still think there is something to it all, be it not that much. Myth busters tested this, but I don't think they were as precise in their measurements and forget another flaw I noticed that they did. You also have to take into account the computer (even in older vehicles) that reads all your car sensors, exhaust sensors that adjusts the fuel injection. During my experiment, that's the stage I got to... Figuring out how to tweak the sensors to get the computer to inject less gasoline to account for the additional hydrogen.

All in all it was a fun experiment. I had the same exact gas stations for fillup and driving routes. I had a switch on my dash to turn the unit on and off. I know you can run an engine on hydrogen, you just need to retrofit it with tighter seals, gaskets and some other modifications so if you can supply enough you could run your car. There are companies that retrofit vehicles though I haven't followed up on them lately. It's a hobby I don't currently have time for unfortunately.
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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby hyksos on July 6th, 2015, 1:36 am 

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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby zetreque on July 6th, 2015, 1:40 am 

Never heard of that tire thing before. That's cool.

You want crazy ideas? I have always wondered how much voltage you could get by connecting a wire tapped into the trunk of a tree and then grounding it in the dirt below the tree.

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=27078
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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby hyksos on July 6th, 2015, 5:29 pm 

Yikes.

This got me thinking. 1.) Genetically modify a tree to maximize electricity production. 2.) Sell the seeds. 3) Retire comfortably.
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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby gjenkins on July 14th, 2015, 5:30 pm 

For re-charging, I think using solar panels would be the best way. Since the source is renewable and would not put a strain on the electricity grid. The cost for this is only for one time and no other additional cost to run it, except for maintenance. The nano-generators on the wheels might be a good solution too. A comparison on the cost-benefit for both would be helpful.

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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby hyksos on July 19th, 2015, 11:16 pm 

I have discovered another promising technology that could be used in hybrid cars : the thermoelectric generator

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoelectric_generator
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Re: re-charging solutions for hybrid cars

Postby Darby on July 20th, 2015, 9:59 am 

hyksos » July 19th, 2015, 11:16 pm wrote:I have discovered another promising technology that could be used in hybrid cars : the thermoelectric generator

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoelectric_generator


Just to chime in - that technology can only work in a vehicle equipped with a heat-producing combustion engine, and is thus only suited for hybrid, not all electric nor all combustion.

The technology is also not robust enough yet, but seems to be moving in the right direction. The most promising applications at present involve recycling part of the heat lost in combustion powered electricity plants, and things like concrete factories. Things would need to get a lot smaller and more efficient to be cost effective in a hybrid car.
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